Who should be excluded to help with the overcrowding problem.

Fable McCloud

Well-Known Member
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I disagree, having only 1 major nighttime offering is causing the crowding. Previously there were 2 night parades and 1 fireworks show which helped to spread out the crowds considerably.
I agree, when I went on my first couple trips you could see the SpectroMagic and Wishes twice per night. If you had little ones, you could do the early set, then get out of dodge. We always rode during the first set, then when the crowds had thinned a lot we'd watch the last set of the night. It was way easier to exit and to get good viewing spots. Why not do the nighttime Castle show twice? They project for the majority of the shows, who's to say you could't do HEA two times a night?
 

MickeyLuv'r

Well-Known Member
There's also that vacation mentality that I'm sure many have but won't admit to - even those of us who return ad nauseum. What's another $50 on this or that? I just spent $2000 to get here. Another $120? No big whoop. $199, that's pushing it but who knows if this will be around next time. It's akin to being offered a paid "discount" upgrade at a resort, for just $140 more a night. Yeah, of course! Sign me up.

Nothing will change. When there's a shift in the economy, things will dip but when they come back up, it'll be higher than before. But it doesn't mean that it isn't RIDICULOUS.
I came to these boards- a great many moons ago - primarily because I wanted to know of ways to keep WDW costs down (like discount offers). More of less, I feel I've read about every WDW money-saving option, and tried a number of them over the years.

I long ago concluded: time is $, and it works both ways at WDW. (Many $ saving options cost time, and many time saving options cost $.)

It is a bit like choosing between two airport parking lot options. The economy lot costs less, but it is further from the terminal, the shuttle bus comes less often, and the lot is uncovered. The garage costs a few $ more, but then you don't arrive back to car that's maybe vandalized, or encased in solid ice. Maybe the extra 20minutes saved = making/not making your flight (or maybe making/not making your boarding group, or having any lunch that day).

Now each of us is going to have different opinions on how we value (with $) our time, so there isn't one answer for everyone. I can't say which choices work for anyone else, but sometimes paying a little extra is well worthwhile.

Where to cut back, and where to spend a little extra, is all part of the big WDW puzzle.
 

MickeyLuv'r

Well-Known Member
1. The best example of this is how freeways work. You wind up with congestion, so you add 2 more lanes. Then what happens? You get less congestion for a while, until people discover the new road, and fill it up again. This can be simple rerouting, or building new homes next to the nice open freeway. Doesn't stay open for long.

2. An unpopular option of mine is that WDW should have flexible pricing. That is, holiday weekends prices are 3x higher than normal. It is not an unheard of concept, the airlines and cruise-lines, and tons of other operations do this. That would even out crowds and maybe help.
1. This is a bit of a myth of sorts. Transportation infrastructure is a complex issue too big for a little space like this, but NOT adding infrastructure doesn't mean there will be less congestion. Part of the problem is that politicians control infrastructure choices and construction companies have long understood the value of working with and donating to politicians.

Construction and roadway improvements go hand in hand. By the time the roads are widened, housing/office construction has usually already begun. There's often an open partnership. Growth has been good for the financial well being of our country, so it isn't all bad. Growth = a better economy, better schools, more jobs.

Then of course, wider roads aren't the only way to improve flow and infrastructure. WDW has made many tweaks over the years that hardly anyone notices. The covered part of the MK monorail ramps used to have support poles up the middle of the walkway. People holding hands would often stop and back up when they got to the poles. It became a significant problem until the poles were eliminated. I bet most folks didn't even notice.

Then there's also mass transit. Imagine WDW without boats, buses, the Skyway, or the monorail. Or imagine the USA with more of these options. To me, it is dumb that there isn't something like an I-4 high speed railway. If there was a super nice mass transit option that was 50% faster than I-4, then I-4 would be empty.



2. Where have you been? WDW's had flexible pricing for many years.

Poly ST view value weekday = $593, weekend value season = $629
Same room over Spring Break = I kid you not - $1123
Over Christmas? The same room = $1307!

On top of that, ticket prices fluctuate (up to 34%), plus the recent price increase.

On top of that, food prices fluctuate regularly. There are no price signs posted at the WDW buffets. At buffets, you make your reservation in advance, then you are simply at the mercy of whatever price WDW decides to charge that day - or pay $10pp for not eating.
 

jloucks

Well-Known Member
1. This is a bit of a myth of sorts. Transportation infrastructure is a complex issue too big for a little space like this, but NOT adding infrastructure doesn't mean there will be less congestion. Part of the problem is that politicians control infrastructure choices and construction companies have long understood the value of working with and donating to politicians.

Construction and roadway improvements go hand in hand. By the time the roads are widened, housing/office construction has usually already begun. There's often an open partnership. Growth has been good for the financial well being of our country, so it isn't all bad. Growth = a better economy, better schools, more jobs.

Then of course, wider roads aren't the only way to improve flow and infrastructure. WDW has made many tweaks over the years that hardly anyone notices. The covered part of the MK monorail ramps used to have support poles up the middle of the walkway. People holding hands would often stop and back up when they got to the poles. It became a significant problem until the poles were eliminated. I bet most folks didn't even notice.

Then there's also mass transit. Imagine WDW without boats, buses, the Skyway, or the monorail. Or imagine the USA with more of these options. To me, it is dumb that there isn't something like an I-4 high speed railway. If there was a super nice mass transit option that was 50% faster than I-4, then I-4 would be empty.



2. Where have you been? WDW's had flexible pricing for many years.

Poly ST view value weekday = $593, weekend value season = $629
Same room over Spring Break = I kid you not - $1123
Over Christmas? The same room = $1307!

On top of that, ticket prices fluctuate (up to 34%), plus the recent price increase.

On top of that, food prices fluctuate regularly. There are no price signs posted at the WDW buffets. At buffets, you make your reservation in advance, then you are simply at the mercy of whatever price WDW decides to charge that day - or pay $10pp for not eating.
What?!?! Almost 100% increase on room rates over spring break!? Dang, you are right, that is the cruise line model.

It has been a few years since I have gone and we never went the 3 top weeks so I never experienced this. I will say, the other 49 weeks were all about the same price. At least, I don't recall any shock at price variations. We did get a free meal plan one trip. Those became impossible to find in later years.

Our Disney Cruise over Thanksgiving was a frikkin eye opener tho... about 90% over regular price. Oh, and 100% sold out. Makes me wonder what price point (+120%? +200%?) would bring the ship to 90% capacity.

I guess all WDW can do is keep cranking the prices.
 

MAGICFLOP

Active Member
So my question is, who has to stay away or go to another park so that people who do not like the crowds can have a better time?
To make WDW the most magical for those in the parks (as you asked), I would get rid of regulars in favor of first timers.. for a multitude of reasons.. They spend the money, they create excitement (face it, what is more fun atmosphere? to see a little kid meet Mickey for the 1st time or see a kid meet Mickey for the 30th time?)

I, like you, did the same thing in the late 90's and 00's by taking advantage of low attendance... I now stay away to let others have fun...

I saw 'The Exorcist' in the theater with other first timers and people screaming made it more terrifying.. not the same feel if I would have seen it with people that saw it 50 times..
 

wdwtopten

Well-Known Member
Just my 2 cents on how to ease the overcrowding:

* Add capacity. This means adding rides and shows. Shows are likely cheaper and can have greater capacity with less chance of downtime.
* Lower the number of guests allowed inside. Whatever the limit is now, decrease it by 30%.
* Staff every attraction to maximize throughput.
* Run every attraction at 100% throughout.
* Open more table service restaurants in the parks.
* Incentivise guests to dine at Disney Springs. Offer happy hours or coupons or something to pull guests out of the parks.

My most controversial idea would be to flat out ban strollers. They are big, bulky, and jam up the walk ways. "Parking" them is always a hassle and congests the parks further. When I took my young son to WDW, I never used a stroller. He walked until he was too tired and then I carried him. Alternatively, or in addition, we could have left the parks in the afternoon and retuned to our hotel for a break. If you *need* a stroller, then don't come to WDW. This might seem harsh to some, but it would be a HUGE quality of life improvement for everyone.
 
Just my 2 cents on how to ease the overcrowding:

* Add capacity. This means adding rides and shows. Shows are likely cheaper and can have greater capacity with less chance of downtime.
* Lower the number of guests allowed inside. Whatever the limit is now, decrease it by 30%.
* Staff every attraction to maximize throughput.
* Run every attraction at 100% throughout.
* Open more table service restaurants in the parks.
* Incentivise guests to dine at Disney Springs. Offer happy hours or coupons or something to pull guests out of the parks.

My most controversial idea would be to flat out ban strollers. They are big, bulky, and jam up the walk ways. "Parking" them is always a hassle and congests the parks further. When I took my young son to WDW, I never used a stroller. He walked until he was too tired and then I carried him. Alternatively, or in addition, we could have left the parks in the afternoon and retuned to our hotel for a break. If you *need* a stroller, then don't come to WDW. This might seem harsh to some, but it would be a HUGE quality of life improvement for everyone.
Not everyone is able bodied enough to carry a child throughout the park. It would greatly reduce my quality of life and that of many families.
 

jaklgreen

Well-Known Member
Just my 2 cents on how to ease the overcrowding:

* Add capacity. This means adding rides and shows. Shows are likely cheaper and can have greater capacity with less chance of downtime.
* Lower the number of guests allowed inside. Whatever the limit is now, decrease it by 30%.
* Staff every attraction to maximize throughput.
* Run every attraction at 100% throughout.
* Open more table service restaurants in the parks.
* Incentivise guests to dine at Disney Springs. Offer happy hours or coupons or something to pull guests out of the parks.

My most controversial idea would be to flat out ban strollers. They are big, bulky, and jam up the walk ways. "Parking" them is always a hassle and congests the parks further. When I took my young son to WDW, I never used a stroller. He walked until he was too tired and then I carried him. Alternatively, or in addition, we could have left the parks in the afternoon and retuned to our hotel for a break. If you *need* a stroller, then don't come to WDW. This might seem harsh to some, but it would be a HUGE quality of life improvement for everyone.
In the almost 30 years that I have been going to WDW, I have never had an issue with strollers. I have never been hit by one, or have they been in my way. The biggest issues that I have had are the large groups that walk side by side and block the walkways. 5 people walking side by side is much worse then someone pushing a stroller in front of them. Maybe they should ban big groups and only let in parties of 4 or less. Or they can rope off walkways making it impossible for more then 2 people to walk next to each other. That would cut down on the jammed up walkways. And anyone that just stops dead while walking, if it is not an emergency, should be put in Disney time out until they learn proper traffic flow etiquette.:rolleyes:
 

rk03221

Well-Known Member
I was a cm at wdw for a few years so I’ll give you my best. Disney world caters to first time and international guests. They keep raising prices because people are still buying. It’s pretty simple. The Disney execs could give less of a sh*t how your experience is, all they care about is the $$$ coming in. For Disney world that is
 

GinaD613

Member
To ease overcrowding duplicate the parks elsewhere in the US, eg Midwest or Mid Atlantic. It might mean cannibalizing attendance from WDW, but might not if WDW is catering to international travelers.

then again, more parks might equa more revenue.
 

HongKongFooy

Well-Known Member
The world has a pop of 7.5 billion, if they all went one day per year, would mean 20m people a day at the parks.


Of the 7.5 billion what % would satisfy the 3 necessary requirements to tap WDW:

Have the desire
Have the physical ability
Have the financial wherewithal

I would guess noticeably under 1% would qualify.
 

HongKongFooy

Well-Known Member
To make WDW the most magical for those in the parks (as you asked), I would get rid of regulars in favor of first timers.. for a multitude of reasons.. They spend the money,
How in the world does the spending habits of another affect your enjoyment at the parks?
 

jaklgreen

Well-Known Member
To ease overcrowding duplicate the parks elsewhere in the US, eg Midwest or Mid Atlantic. It might mean cannibalizing attendance from WDW, but might not if WDW is catering to international travelers.

then again, more parks might equa more revenue.
I would love a WDW closer to me in the midwest. Plenty of room over here. ;)
 
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