Wheelchair with no DAS

Disneylover1619

New Member
Original Poster
If someone in your party has a wheelchair but does NOT qualify for DAS, I understand there are a few rides where you can get a virtual return time to go on the ride. Are Jungle Cruise, Big Thunder Mountain and Spaceship Earth the only ones like this? Are there any others? And when they do go on could they bring 5 others plus someone under 2 with them?
 

Smiley/OCD

Well-Known Member
If someone in your party has a wheelchair but does NOT qualify for DAS, I understand there are a few rides where you can get a virtual return time to go on the ride. Are Jungle Cruise, Big Thunder Mountain and Spaceship Earth the only ones like this? Are there any others? And when they do go on could they bring 5 others plus someone under 2 with them?
First, welcome to the boards!! If you don’t qualify for DAS, there aren’t any virtual return times…there are rides that have specific cars for handicapped that can’t get out of their wheelchair: PotC, iasw in MK, LwtL, Ratatouille in EPCOT, TSM in HWD and KS and the train going to the Conservation Station in AK…can the guest walk at all? Can they transfer from the wheelchair to a ride? If yes, you can take the wheelchair right up to the ride and transfer. I may have missed a ride or 2.
You can check on here for handicapped access. I don’t know when you’re going, and the mobility of the guest, but its a LOT of pushing…if they are able, perhaps look into renting a scooter for them?
I’ll be glad to answer any questions you have!!
 

WorldExplorer

Well-Known Member
First, welcome to the boards!! If you don’t qualify for DAS, there aren’t any virtual return times…there are rides that have specific cars for handicapped that can’t get out of their wheelchair: PotC, iasw in MK, LwtL, Ratatouille in EPCOT, TSM in HWD and KS and the train going to the Conservation Station in AK…can the guest walk at all? Can they transfer from the wheelchair to a ride? If yes, you can take the wheelchair right up to the ride and transfer. I may have missed a ride or 2.
You can check on here for handicapped access. I don’t know when you’re going, and the mobility of the guest, but its a LOT of pushing…if they are able, perhaps look into renting a scooter for them?
I’ll be glad to answer any questions you have!!
I went with someone in a wheelchair who was not signed up for DAS. When we walked up to Jungle Cruise we were stopped before entering and given a return time.

Peter Pan did not offer the same thing when we asked because "our queue is wheelchair accessible!" so we presumed it was a matter of whether or not people would get physically stuck in the normal line.

Also, "pushing all day" and "navigate crowds in scooter" is a pick your poison kind of thing. I see people advocate for the scooters a lot and I realize the disability probably influenced how that goes, but I like to just make sure people know those can be a big pain before they get stuck with one.
 

Smiley/OCD

Well-Known Member
I went with someone in a wheelchair who was not signed up for DAS. When we walked up to Jungle Cruise we were stopped before entering and given a return time.

Peter Pan did not offer the same thing when we asked because "our queue is wheelchair accessible!" so we presumed it was a matter of whether or not people would get physically stuck in the normal line.

Also, "pushing all day" and "navigate crowds in scooter" is a pick your poison kind of thing. I see people advocate for the scooters a lot and I realize the disability probably influenced how that goes, but I like to just make sure people know those can be a big pain before they get stuck with one.
Some CM’s bend the rules when they see a person not trying to take advantage of the system…I’m glad things worked out for you. That’s why I asked… if they aren’t capable of driving an ECV, it’s a moot point.
 

Tony the Tigger

Well-Known Member
Had to push my spouse around one day before back surgery. Easy and inexpensive to get a chair, no line-cutting, which was fine with us. A few attractions had a separate entrance once you got most of the way through the line, but it didn’t seem like there was a time advantage, nor should there be. We did not ask nor were we offered any special treatment. He was able to walk from the chair to the ride vehicle.

I wouldn’t expect anything; but if it happens, consider it pixie dust.
 

nickys

Premium Member
To be clear here, CMs weren’t bending any rules by giving a return time to someone in a wheelchair or scooter.

Some lines cannot take wheelchairs / scooters for various reasons, and for those rides you will be given a return time and then taken in a different way. The important thing is to be very clear how far someone can walk if asked. Don’t just say “yes”, be specific as to 2m or 20m.

There are also a handful of rides which are simply not possible to ride for some guests. This page should help, with comprehensive lists of rides and what is required regarding transferring etc.

 

CynBeth

Active Member
When DH, DM, and myself were there in November around Thanksgiving my DM needed a wheelchair. She only goes on a few rides at each park plus shows so can only speak about our experiences with those as best as I can remember. At MK we had booked a LL for Jungle Cruise or Jingle Cruise as it was at that time but when we got there found out the special boat where she could have gone in her wheelchair was broken and she did not feel she could step in to the boat. At IASW they have a special boat you can take the wheelchair on there is a different entrance. If I remember correctly there was enough seats for 2 plus the wheelchair. We did not go on it this trip but the trip before 3 years ago she also needed a wheelchair and Little Mermaid had a special clam shell. Do not remember if both of us could go with her or if there was room for only 1 with the wheelchair. The Peoplemover does not have anything special you have to be able to go on the moving sidewalk. For COP there was a special section for wheelchairs I think was in the front and we could both sit with her and Philharmagic believe it was in the back and we could also sit with her. I think HOP was the same. The Tiki Room could sit anywhere. For the riverboat she had to go down a different entrance and was on the lowest level.
At AK for the KS she was fine to leave her wheelchair and step on to the vehicle. I believe the train to CS they could get her on in the wheelchair. At Navi we had made a LL they have no special boat all they could do was move her wheelchair close and luckily she was able to step in. At the Kite Tails there was a special section up top and only 1 person could sit with her. At the bird show I think the special section was near the front and we could sit with her. At Epcot for Spaceship Earth she had to go to an entrance on the side and I think there was no special car she left her wheelchair and they stopped the ride so she could step on and did the same coming off. I think they had a special boat for Living with the Land do not recall for how many people. We did not do it this trip but 3 years ago believe Nemo had a special car do not remember if room for only 1 or if both if us could go with her. For the movie in Canada it is circle vision.For American Adventure believe it was a special section in the back and we could sit with her. She did not go on any rides at HS just shows like Muppets and Frozen since Indy was still closed and believe there were special sections in front and we could be with her. Most restaurants are one floor so no issues but for LTT at MK there are different sections with steps and there is a lift to get you to the main level but can’t remember if the lower restroom was on the same floor but worst case a few steps. There is another one with many more steps.
 
Last edited:

WorldExplorer

Well-Known Member
Some CM’s bend the rules when they see a person not trying to take advantage of the system…I’m glad things worked out for you. That’s why I asked… if they aren’t capable of driving an ECV, it’s a moot point.
Sorry, that was overly confrontational and I should have worded it better. I'm just always a little surprised by how many people prefer the scooters, they're not good in crowds from our experience.
 

Smiley/OCD

Well-Known Member
Sorry, that was overly confrontational and I should have worded it better. I'm just always a little surprised by how many people prefer the scooters, they're not good in crowds from our experience.
I use one 24/7 while I’m there…the problem is twofold…first there are the “entitled” guests, the ones that think walking guests have to get out of their way…you know the ones……the second group are the ones who never used a scooter, got on it and have never rode one, steered one or stopped one. These guests I feel sorry for because they should be given the chance to ride one out of the way BEFORE they go into the park. It’s as if you turned 17, get the keys to the car and off you go!
That’s why I tell everybody who’s renting one for the first time to take 15-20 minutes and learn how it operates before going into the park. Just like some people shouldn’t have drivers licenses, some shouldn’t be allowed to rent scooters.
 

MichWolv

Born Modest. Wore Off.
Premium Member
My mother uses a wheelchair at the parks because she can’t walk a long way, but can walk shorter distances. So she can transfer from the chair easily. The following attractions give us (whole party of 5) return times due to the inability of the regular line to handle wheelchairs:

Space Mountain
Thunder Mountain
Jungle Cruise
Star Tours
Living with the Land
It‘s a Small World
Spaceship Earth

Note — If lines are short, they will just send you to the alternate entrance immediately. This happens most of the time at Spaceship Earth, IaSW, and LwtL.
 

Trackmaster

Well-Known Member
I know this may be an unpopular opinion in times like these, but I just wonder why personality accountability and common sense isn't considered. If somebody can't handle walking around on their own two feet all day, and/or can't wait in long lines for whatever reason, why don't those people just choose to not go to a theme park all day? Should we made skiing, mountain climbing, or Scuba diving handicap accessible?

I get that parks have done some great things with accessibility, and the ADA law exists, but to me it just doesn't seem to be working out in practicality, and is putting an undo cost on the park and 98% of the guests. I just don't see what part of walking around in a theme park for 12 hours in the heat and riding fast rides makes people think that this would be an experience that all should experience? I don't understand why Disney can't just explain what the experience will be like, and wish people a great time on a cruise ship, at the beach, or at a baseball game if that doesn't sound right for them.

Just my take on the matter.
 

Chi84

Premium Member
I know this may be an unpopular opinion in times like these, but I just wonder why personality accountability and common sense isn't considered. If somebody can't handle walking around on their own two feet all day, and/or can't wait in long lines for whatever reason, why don't those people just choose to not go to a theme park all day? Should we made skiing, mountain climbing, or Scuba diving handicap accessible?

I get that parks have done some great things with accessibility, and the ADA law exists, but to me it just doesn't seem to be working out in practicality, and is putting an undo cost on the park and 98% of the guests. I just don't see what part of walking around in a theme park for 12 hours in the heat and riding fast rides makes people think that this would be an experience that all should experience? I don't understand why Disney can't just explain what the experience will be like, and wish people a great time on a cruise ship, at the beach, or at a baseball game if that doesn't sound right for them.

Just my take on the matter.
The accommodations required by the ADA make it possible for people with disabilities to choose for themselves what experiences or activities work for them. It really isn’t someone else’s place to decide what they would or would not enjoy.

The reason it’s a law is that society, for the most part, is generous and accepting enough to take measures that allow those with disabilities to participate in life to the fullest extent possible.

I believe that what you consider to be an undue cost is readily borne by most - to the extent that there are laws promoting equal access.

 
Last edited:

Figgy1

Premium Member
I know this may be an unpopular opinion in times like these, but I just wonder why personality accountability and common sense isn't considered. If somebody can't handle walking around on their own two feet all day, and/or can't wait in long lines for whatever reason, why don't those people just choose to not go to a theme park all day? Should we made skiing, mountain climbing, or Scuba diving handicap accessible?

I get that parks have done some great things with accessibility, and the ADA law exists, but to me it just doesn't seem to be working out in practicality, and is putting an undo cost on the park and 98% of the guests. I just don't see what part of walking around in a theme park for 12 hours in the heat and riding fast rides makes people think that this would be an experience that all should experience? I don't understand why Disney can't just explain what the experience will be like, and wish people a great time on a cruise ship, at the beach, or at a baseball game if that doesn't sound right for them.

Just my take on the matter.
Do you really believe all that?
 

Disneyfan_76

Well-Known Member
A good friend of mine has a disease process that is slowly making him crippled. Eventually he will not be able to walk at all. He has good days and bad. I know when they go to Disney they use the DAS system. He will be on his scooter sometimes, other times, when able, he will walk. As he puts it, "My days of walking around are numbered, so I try and do as much as I can with the kids while I am still able". He would be more than happy to wait in line with everyone else, but he doesn't always know when his body is going to give out on him. My point is that you may not always know someone's situation. You are just seeing a brief moment of their day.
 

LAKid53

Official Member of the Girly Girl Fan Club
Premium Member
I know this may be an unpopular opinion in times like these, but I just wonder why personality accountability and common sense isn't considered. If somebody can't handle walking around on their own two feet all day, and/or can't wait in long lines for whatever reason, why don't those people just choose to not go to a theme park all day? Should we made skiing, mountain climbing, or Scuba diving handicap accessible?

I get that parks have done some great things with accessibility, and the ADA law exists, but to me it just doesn't seem to be working out in practicality, and is putting an undo cost on the park and 98% of the guests. I just don't see what part of walking around in a theme park for 12 hours in the heat and riding fast rides makes people think that this would be an experience that all should experience? I don't understand why Disney can't just explain what the experience will be like, and wish people a great time on a cruise ship, at the beach, or at a baseball game if that doesn't sound right for them.

Just my take on the matter.

Ever hear of the Paralympic Games? Special Olympics? Disabled people ski, scuba dive and even climb Everest.

runDisney has a wheelchair division for EVERY race. Like to see you run 26.2 miles in a chair specially designed for racing. Blind and deaf runners compete. When we approach them, we congratulate them by thanking the guide running with them.
 

"El Gran Magnifico"

Bring Me A Shrubbery
Premium Member
I know this may be an unpopular opinion in times like these, but I just wonder why personality accountability and common sense isn't considered. If somebody can't handle walking around on their own two feet all day, and/or can't wait in long lines for whatever reason, why don't those people just choose to not go to a theme park all day? Should we made skiing, mountain climbing, or Scuba diving handicap accessible?

I get that parks have done some great things with accessibility, and the ADA law exists, but to me it just doesn't seem to be working out in practicality, and is putting an undo cost on the park and 98% of the guests. I just don't see what part of walking around in a theme park for 12 hours in the heat and riding fast rides makes people think that this would be an experience that all should experience? I don't understand why Disney can't just explain what the experience will be like, and wish people a great time on a cruise ship, at the beach, or at a baseball game if that doesn't sound right for them.

Just my take on the matter.

I don’t know where to start my response. I do know how it’s going to end though.
 

The Mom

Moderator
Premium Member
I know this may be an unpopular opinion in times like these, but I just wonder why personality accountability and common sense isn't considered. If somebody can't handle walking around on their own two feet all day, and/or can't wait in long lines for whatever reason, why don't those people just choose to not go to a theme park all day? Should we made skiing, mountain climbing, or Scuba diving handicap accessible?

I get that parks have done some great things with accessibility, and the ADA law exists, but to me it just doesn't seem to be working out in practicality, and is putting an undo cost on the park and 98% of the guests. I just don't see what part of walking around in a theme park for 12 hours in the heat and riding fast rides makes people think that this would be an experience that all should experience? I don't understand why Disney can't just explain what the experience will be like, and wish people a great time on a cruise ship, at the beach, or at a baseball game if that doesn't sound right for them.

Just my take on the matter.
Perhaps you think we should go back to the days when people with disabilities were warehoused in institutions. :rolleyes:
 

Angel Ariel

Well-Known Member
I know this may be an unpopular opinion in times like these, but I just wonder why personality accountability and common sense isn't considered. If somebody can't handle walking around on their own two feet all day, and/or can't wait in long lines for whatever reason, why don't those people just choose to not go to a theme park all day? Should we made skiing, mountain climbing, or Scuba diving handicap accessible?

I get that parks have done some great things with accessibility, and the ADA law exists, but to me it just doesn't seem to be working out in practicality, and is putting an undo cost on the park and 98% of the guests. I just don't see what part of walking around in a theme park for 12 hours in the heat and riding fast rides makes people think that this would be an experience that all should experience? I don't understand why Disney can't just explain what the experience will be like, and wish people a great time on a cruise ship, at the beach, or at a baseball game if that doesn't sound right for them.

Just my take on the matter.
I am seriously hoping this is just trolling.

May you never have to experience the discrimination you’re displaying towards others here.
 

Angel Ariel

Well-Known Member
The reason it’s a law is that society, for the most part, is generous and accepting enough to take measures that allow those with disabilities to participate in life to the fullest extent possible.
I agree with your post overall, but I’d actually say the reason the ADA is law is because society *wasn’t* voluntarily taking action to be accessible and was happy to segregate those with disabilities, until the law indicated they weren’t allowed to anymore.

Now, views are changing and accessibility is beginning to be a more common way of thinking. But there’s still a long way to go, imo.
 

Register on WDWMAGIC. This sidebar will go away, and you'll see fewer ads.

Back
Top Bottom