The Neighbor Lady and TP2000 Walk Into a Bar...

TP2000

Well-Known Member
Original Poster
How about sharing the bearnaise sauce recipie!?
The beauty of this recipe is that you heat the butter in advance in the microwave, and then blend it into the egg/vinegar mixture, instead of the other way around as in traditional recipes.

I strongly suggest getting the fresh taragon in the produce section like they have at my Ralph's supermarket, instead of the dried taragon from McCormick. Fresh taragon leaves and freshly chopped shallots, plus a good quality butter like Land O Lakes, made this recipe impossible to tell from the traditional and longer recipe from Julia Child that I'd used for decades.

The Neighbor Lady's Hip New Easy Bearnaise Sauce

Ingredients:
  • 1/4 cup white wine vinegar
  • 1/2 cup dry white wine (I used Holland House cooking wine)
  • 4 full sprigs tarragon, leaves finely minced, stems reserved separately
  • 1 small shallot, roughly chopped
  • 1/2 teaspoon whole black peppercorns
  • 2 egg yolks
  • Kosher salt
  • 1 1/2 sticks plus one extra tablespoon (13 tablespoons) unsalted butter
Directions:
  1. Combine vinegar, wine, herb stems, shallots, and black peppercorns in a small saucepan. Bring to a simmer over medium-high heat and lower heat to maintain a gentle simmer. Cook until reduced to about 1 1/2 tablespoons of liquid, about 15 minutes. Carefully strain liquid through a fine mesh strainer into a small bowl, pressing on the solids with the back of a spoon to extract as much liquid as possible.

  2. Combine vinegar reduction, egg yolk, and a pinch of salt in the bottom of a tall cup that barely fits the head of an immersion blender. (I used a big travel coffee mug) Melt butter in microwave, pausing occasionally until foaming subsides. Transfer butter to a 1-cup liquid measuring cup.

  3. Place head of immersion blender into the bottom of the cup and turn it on. With the blender constantly running, slowly pour hot butter into cup. It should emulsify with the egg yolk and vinegar reduction. Continue pouring until all butter is added. Sauce should be thick and creamy. If it is thin and runny, whisk constantly and vigorously until sauce is thickened. Season to taste with salt. Whisk in chopped tarragon leaves. Serve immediately, or transfer to a small lidded pot and keep in a warm place for up to 1 hour before serving. Béarnaise cannot be cooled and reheated.
I used this for grilled boneless Ribeye steaks for the Rose Bowl, and it was perfection. I doubled the recipe and placed the extra Bearnaise in a warming gravy boat on the buffet, and a few guests raved so much they went back and put more on their baked potatoes, which told me it was a hit.
 

Darkbeer1

Well-Known Member
Sitting in the city's Honda Center suite (Ducks game). Will post when I get home. Some interesting discussions about Ada, the ALWI and other things...

Yes, I am a tease....
 

freebird72

Active Member
The beauty of this recipe is that you heat the butter in advance in the microwave, and then blend it into the egg/vinegar mixture, instead of the other way around as in traditional recipes.

I strongly suggest getting the fresh taragon in the produce section like they have at my Ralph's supermarket, instead of the dried taragon from McCormick. Fresh taragon leaves and freshly chopped shallots, plus a good quality butter like Land O Lakes, made this recipe impossible to tell from the traditional and longer recipe from Julia Child that I'd used for decades.

The Neighbor Lady's Hip New Easy Bearnaise Sauce

Ingredients:
  • 1/4 cup white wine vinegar
  • 1/2 cup dry white wine (I used Holland House cooking wine)
  • 4 full sprigs tarragon, leaves finely minced, stems reserved separately
  • 1 small shallot, roughly chopped
  • 1/2 teaspoon whole black peppercorns
  • 2 egg yolks
  • Kosher salt
  • 1 1/2 sticks plus one extra tablespoon (13 tablespoons) unsalted butter
Directions:
  1. Combine vinegar, wine, herb stems, shallots, and black peppercorns in a small saucepan. Bring to a simmer over medium-high heat and lower heat to maintain a gentle simmer. Cook until reduced to about 1 1/2 tablespoons of liquid, about 15 minutes. Carefully strain liquid through a fine mesh strainer into a small bowl, pressing on the solids with the back of a spoon to extract as much liquid as possible.

  2. Combine vinegar reduction, egg yolk, and a pinch of salt in the bottom of a tall cup that barely fits the head of an immersion blender. (I used a big travel coffee mug) Melt butter in microwave, pausing occasionally until foaming subsides. Transfer butter to a 1-cup liquid measuring cup.

  3. Place head of immersion blender into the bottom of the cup and turn it on. With the blender constantly running, slowly pour hot butter into cup. It should emulsify with the egg yolk and vinegar reduction. Continue pouring until all butter is added. Sauce should be thick and creamy. If it is thin and runny, whisk constantly and vigorously until sauce is thickened. Season to taste with salt. Whisk in chopped tarragon leaves. Serve immediately, or transfer to a small lidded pot and keep in a warm place for up to 1 hour before serving. Béarnaise cannot be cooled and reheated.
I used this for grilled boneless Ribeye steaks for the Rose Bowl, and it was perfection. I doubled the recipe and placed the extra Bearnaise in a warming gravy boat on the buffet, and a few guests raved so much they went back and put more on their baked potatoes, which told me it was a hit.
This made me laugh, because at Christmas, my sister and I had a whole argument about straining the vinegar mixture before putting in a blender (we used Tyler Florence's recipe, which doesn't say to strain it). She won, and this confirms it.
 

MisterPenguin

Rumormonger
Premium Member
You have a knack for making brilliant posts that remain all but ignored. =D
The irony is that @the.dreamfinder may be Gary Snider, i.e., Spirit's (Michael Snyder's) brother. And that is the post in which he (mistakingly) links our TP2000 with one Troy Porter who was, according to Gary, the ghost writer for Lutz and then outs him in that blog post of his. But you think that @the.dreamfinder is prescient for discerning that TP2000 is Lutz precisely because @the.dreamfinder (AKA Gary Snider) just said so in that blog post.

I can make a sock puppet sound like a genius by taking his mistake and declaring it to be the truth in a blog post under a different name. Anyone can.
 

Smooch

Well-Known Member
The irony is that @the.dreamfinder may be Gary Snider, i.e., Spirit's (Michael Snyder's) brother. And that is the post in which he (mistakingly) links our TP2000 with one Troy Porter who was, according to Gary, the ghost writer for Lutz and then outs him in that blog post of his. But you think that @the.dreamfinder is prescient for discerning that TP2000 is Lutz precisely because @the.dreamfinder (AKA Gary Snider) just said so in that blog post.

I can make a sock puppet sound like a genius by taking his mistake and declaring it to be the truth in a blog post under a different name. Anyone can.
I read through all the 85 pages of drama but then I read this and remember exactly how little any of that whole mess makes sense to me

EDIT: I am not kidding, if someone who understands all this could draw up a little chart / visual aid to explain who is who according to the Medium and everyone on this forum, I would genuinely appreciate it o_O
 
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D.Silentu

Well-Known Member
Tip of the hat, I couldn't make it past the sixties before I threw in the towel. Naturally, I'm curious as to the truth, but shocked as I was by the implications of the article, I just can't seem to find the time to keep up.
 

Darkbeer1

Well-Known Member
I am back... The craziness of Anaheim Politics, and a couple of big projects kept me real busy, then when things were slowing down a bit, I found out a lot of secrets involving the D23 announcements, so decided to stay off the boards until after it was over. I was worried I could get myself and others in BIG trouble.

And them they asked me about the Al Lutz stuff, and I just laughed. As someone who knew Al fairly well, heck, he was my best man when I got married....

Al wrote his own stuff. Now, as to where he got his info, well, I know some of it, and sorry, won't share.

Now to get caught up on the last few weeks of posts.
 
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