The Miscellaneous Thought Thread

mickEblu

Well-Known Member
Original Poster
Though I don’t agree with the climate activists who push for the banning of automobiles, I do agree with the sentiment that walkable cities are good for the soul. Places like Disneyland, New York City, DC, and other sites where you can never have to drive are much more pleasant than driving place to place, having to find parking, and being stuck in traffic all day.

Absolutely. You’re disconnected from life indoors. Still haven’t been to NY or DC but they’re on the list.

There is also something to be said for state of mind. When you’re at Disneyland you’ve chosen to “turn off” and that pretty much sets the tone for the day. It’s interesting when I typed that post earlier I had time, was not in a rush and I was relaxed. On the exact same walk back to the dealership a couple hours later I wasn’t nearly in as good a mood. Same street. Same weather. Same everything. Only difference was that I now had food in my hands that I was trying to get to my wife at home while it was still hot. Suddenly, it felt like people and cars were everywhere and everyone was in my way.

I have this thing about people eating hot food. When I host a party or I’m picking up takeout and you’re waiting for me at the house the food will be hot. Seems that less and less people care about that these days. I can’t tell you how often I’m eating cold food at parties and get togethers. If we’re not eating hot food what are we doing?
 

CaptinEO

Well-Known Member
That’s like saying there are carousels throughout the country. Big Thunder Barbecue was a BBQ eatery designed by Imagineers. It was mainly outdoors under awnings in Frontierland, set back among trees so that it was surprisingly immersive and peaceful, looked like an Old West Ranch, served some of the best (and reasonably priced) food in the park, had a fun soundtrack, and was a relaxed, beautiful pocket of serenity that was a joy to escape to. It was just a quick-service eatery, but such a good one my family ate lunch there on most visits during its existence. It’s fondly remembered because it was dang good. Plus goats nearby. 😄
But now you have a tunnel and a cart outside selling light up toys in its place. WDI designed this iteration too. So immersive.
 

Centauri Space Station

Well-Known Member
Why does MK’s Tomorrowland look like this???
View attachment 767700
why does DL’s tomorrowland look like this?
IMG_1265.jpeg
IMG_1258.jpeg
IMG_8312.jpeg
 

LittleBuford

Well-Known Member
Now in 2024 the only live animals in the park are the horses for the streetcars on Main Street. All of the other animals are now gone, done in by budget cuts, or perhaps budget shifts. And victim to a growing lack of showmanship.
I should think changing attitudes to animal welfare have something to do with it.

A good thing in my opinion.
 

PiratesMansion

Well-Known Member
No argument from me here! Both MK and DL have bad TLs, IMO—each weak in its own ways. DL wins the prize for abandoned-junk-in-plain-sight, though.
I'd go further and say that there's no such thing as a good Tomorrowland or Tomorrowland equivalent anywhere at the moment.

All have their problems and thematic/atmospheric inconsistencies.

The only good Tomorrowlands exist in the past.
 

Rich T

Well-Known Member
I'd go further and say that there's no such thing as a good Tomorrowland or Tomorrowland equivalent anywhere at the moment.

All have their problems and thematic/atmospheric inconsistencies.

The only good Tomorrowlands exist in the past.
If I was CEO in a universe where I could ignore all complications, I would gather the necessary people in a conference room, point a frustratingly shaking finger at a photo of 1968 DL Tomorrowland and say, “Just do THIS again! It’s better than what we’ve had ever since! This is pretty! This is pleasing! It’s kinetic! It’s okay if it’s outdated in some ways! This is Disney’s Tomorrowland; it’s its own thing, and it *works!* Call it Tomorrowland Classic! But keep Space Mountain and update Flight to the Moon to make it good!”

I’d also make Blackbeard’s Ghost a walk-around character, make Snow White scary again, build a Darby O’Gill dark ride, bulldoze Pooh for Country Bears Never Die… And send all skip-the-line moneymaking schemes and bubblewands back to the fires of Mount Doom.
 

TP2000

Well-Known Member
I should think changing attitudes to animal welfare have something to do with it.

A good thing in my opinion.

That seems to imply that the animals cared for by the Circle D Cast Members were being mistreated in some way. I severely doubt that was the case.

Or that the animals disliked their human interactions, which didn't seem to be the case at the Big Thunder Ranch.

The only animals who seemed cranky were the Presidential Pardoned Turkeys (turkeys aren't generally charismatic), but then they probably didn't understand how close they came to death before ending up at Disneyland for the rest of their natural lives.

The only animal attraction/interaction I think is probably best left in Yesterland is the Pack Mule ride, owing to both its very low hourly capacity and the difference in BMI of Americans circa 1960 to circa 2024. But even those animals are bred for that sort of thing, which is why pack mules are still used in working environments, or even tourist uses including our National Park system.

 

LittleBuford

Well-Known Member
That seems to imply that the animals cared for by the Circle D Cast Members were being mistreated in some way.
It’s not a criticism of the CMs specifically, but of (petting) zoos as an institution. A few short decades ago, not many people took issue with circus animals, and look where we are now. I believe the very idea of animal entertainment will become anathema within the next fifty years.
 

Rich T

Well-Known Member
It’s not a criticism of the CMs specifically, but of (petting) zoos as an institution. A few short decades ago, not many people took issue with circus animals, and look where we are now. I believe the very idea of animal entertainment will become anathema within the next fifty years.
I believe a properly-run petting zoo of domesticated farm animals, where the animals are well-cared for, have lots of room to wander or just get away by themselves if they choose, are a great thing. As long as there is enough staff to prevent jerk guests from misbehaving, petting zoos can teach a greater appreciation of animals. For many, this is their only encounter with goats, chickens donkeys, ponies etc. and it can form lasting, impactful memories.
 

LittleBuford

Well-Known Member
I believe a properly-run petting zoo of domesticated farm animals, where the animals are well-cared for, have lots of room to wander or just get away by themselves if they choose, are a great thing. As long as there is enough staff to prevent jerk guests from misbehaving, petting zoos can teach a greater appreciation of animals. For many, this is their only encounter with goats, chickens donkeys, ponies etc. and it can form lasting, impactful memories.
I don't believe a crowded theme park is (from the animals' perspective) a good environment for such a facility. Nor am I convinced that petting zoos—or zoos of any kind—teach humans greater respect for animals.

Just my perspective. I'm not looking to change your mind, or anyone else's.
 

Rich T

Well-Known Member
I don't believe a crowded theme park is (from the animals' perspective) a good environment for such a facility. Nor am I convinced that petting zoos—or zoos of any kind—teach humans greater respect for animals.

Just my perspective. I'm not looking to change your mind, or anyone else's.
Speaking from personal experience, I come from a family of animal-fans (three of us at one point wanted to be farm vets at some point in our lives!) and occasional petting zoo visits were a much-loved and fondly remembered part of our lives. And I love a well-run zoo or not-a-zoo. When you look an animal in the eye, live, they become more than abstract concepts or distant scenery. This is an experience I think benefits everyone.

But, heck, I grew up in the 60’s. I used to fret about the safety of the live chickens running around freely in the Knott’s parking lot.
 

LittleBuford

Well-Known Member
Speaking from personal experience, I come from a family of animal-fans (three of us at one point wanted to be farm vets at some point in our lives!) and occasional petting zoo visits were a much-loved and fondly remembered part of our lives. And I love a well-run zoo or not-a-zoo. When you look an animal in the eye, live, they become more than abstract concepts or distant scenery. This is an experience I think benefits everyone.

But, heck, I grew up in the 60’s. I used to fret about the safety of the live chickens running around freely in the Knott’s parking lot.
I appreciate your perspective, even if I don't agree with it. Regardless of how either of us feels on the matter, I think it's fair to say that there is a general (and ongoing) shift away from animal shows and exhibits. Quite how far that shift will go is unclear, and my prediction for the future may well be wrong. But the idea of Disney today opening a zoo is almost inconceivable, such is the change that's come about since as recently as the '90s, when Animal Kingdom opened.
 
Last edited:

Register on WDWMAGIC. This sidebar will go away, and you'll see fewer ads.

Back
Top Bottom