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News Strange rule for Club Cool farewell

CaptJackSparrow

Active Member
Original Poster
We had the opportunity to be at Epcot on Club Cool's last day, and took a picture with the photopass cast member. We chose to pose for the picture with the Coke sampling cups, but the photopass cast member said we had to cover the Coke logo on the cup for the picture, even though the picture was being taken under the Club Cool sign, which also had the Coke logo. Does anyone know if there was any actual logic for this seemingly silly rule?
 

Magicart87

Premium Member
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We had the opportunity to be at Epcot on Club Cool's last day, and took a picture with the photopass cast member. We chose to pose for the picture with the Coke sampling cups, but the photopass cast member said we had to cover the Coke logo on the cup for the picture, even though the picture was being taken under the Club Cool sign, which also had the Coke logo. Does anyone know if there was any actual logic for this seemingly silly rule?
Are they switching to Pepsi?
 

Tom P.

Well-Known Member
There is a common myth in the world of filmmaking and photography that anytime something with a brand name or logo would be visible, that the brand name or logo must be covered for legal reasons. There is actually no legal basis for this what-so-ever, so long as the people involved are just being seen using the product in a normal, average manner. If someone is drinking a can of Coke in a movie, for example, there's no need to obscure the name or the logo. Certainly, someone taking a photo in a theme park has no need what-so-ever to cover the logo.
 

WDWFREAK53

Well-Known Member
There is a common myth in the world of filmmaking and photography that anytime something with a brand name or logo would be visible, that the brand name or logo must be covered for legal reasons. There is actually no legal basis for this what-so-ever, so long as the people involved are just being seen using the product in a normal, average manner. If someone is drinking a can of Coke in a movie, for example, there's no need to obscure the name or the logo. Certainly, someone taking a photo in a theme park has no need what-so-ever to cover the logo.
I always wondered that. I had assumed when they cover up a logo it's because they got advertising dollars from others and it wouldn't be fair to give free advertising to those that didn't pay.

For instance... if Coke pays a huge amount to be in a film...and then a character has a Starbucks cup...Starbucks would be obscured because they didn't pay the amount that Coke paid.
 

egg

Well-Known Member
Unless I’m missing something real odd, no. Coke puts their logos on the cups because they want them to be seen on the cups. They also pay Disney a fat sum of money for exclusive sponsorship rights and expect their logo to be displayed. There is no question.

If anything, this CM could get Disney in trouble.
 

Janir

Well-Known Member
The Photopass picture is a picture that is being sold to the guests and thus leaves Disney open to potential sales of a product co-branded product that Coke and Disney have no agreement on. If it were a private picture or a picture that wasn't monitiezed, there'd be no issues. But with the monitization aspect of a Disney Photopass picture, I'm sure the overall rule is for Photopass photogs to avoid logos where they can as to not open up Disney for lawsuits.
 

FerretAfros

Well-Known Member
That would be corporate suicide on a grand scale...
How so? In the early years of both DL and MK, Pepsi and Coke were both corporate sponsors and were served simultaneously in each park. Pepsi sponsored facilities and was served on the west side of the parks, while Coke sponsored facilities and was served on the east side.





Even though the sponsorship of the Country Bear Jamboree is long gone, Pepsi's influence has been forever immortalized in Henry's exclamation at the top of the show that the bears "have a lot to give," which was a reference to the "You've got a lot to give, Pepsi's got a lot to give" slogan of that era.

It was a harmonious relationship that was renegotiated when the contracts expired. There's no reason to think that Disney wouldn't consider renegotiating its current contract when it expires too, if they saw a benefit to switching to a different provider. Sponsorships and corporate partnerships come and go all the time. How would this one be any different?
 

CaptJackSparrow

Active Member
Original Poster
The Photopass picture is a picture that is being sold to the guests and thus leaves Disney open to potential sales of a product co-branded product that Coke and Disney have no agreement on. If it were a private picture or a picture that wasn't monitiezed, there'd be no issues. But with the monitization aspect of a Disney Photopass picture, I'm sure the overall rule is for Photopass photogs to avoid logos where they can as to not open up Disney for lawsuits.
If that were true, then the Coke logo that was part of the signage would need to be covered up too.
 

cheezbat

Well-Known Member
Keep on preaching! While Diet Coke is okay, I prefer Diet Pepsi whenever I have the choice. Never have Diet Coke at home.
I hate Coke. It’s everywhere. I’m a Pepsi and Dew guy through and through. Here in central Florida all the theme parks serve Coke products...Disney, Universal, Legoland, Sea World And Busch Gardens...you just can’t get away from it. What’s even crappier is you can’t even get a Dr Pepper or Surge anywhere either. I know Pepper isn’t a Coke product, but they often team up with them...but Surge is a Coke product...

I miss the days when you had variety at the parks...

Heck, the Sea World/Busch parks and Cypress Gardens used to serve Pepsi.... better times....
 

Slikke

New Member
How so? In the early years of both DL and MK, Pepsi and Coke were both corporate sponsors and were served simultaneously in each park. Pepsi sponsored facilities and was served on the west side of the parks, while Coke sponsored facilities and was served on the east side.





Even though the sponsorship of the Country Bear Jamboree is long gone, Pepsi's influence has been forever immortalized in Henry's exclamation at the top of the show that the bears "have a lot to give," which was a reference to the "You've got a lot to give, Pepsi's got a lot to give" slogan of that era.

It was a harmonious relationship that was renegotiated when the contracts expired. There's no reason to think that Disney wouldn't consider renegotiating its current contract when it expires too, if they saw a benefit to switching to a different provider. Sponsorships and corporate partnerships come and go all the time. How would this one be any different?
Simply put, Coke's worldwide brand awareness is way more than Pepsi could ever dream of being and has a huge international footprint.. Pepsi has spread itself too wide over the past 2 decades with failed spinoff ventures and has lost its branding it had back in the 70's , early 80's... Coke has always been the leader in brand marketing.. From USA Today (Oct 2018):

5. Coca-Cola
• Brand value: $66.34 billion
• Annual revenue: $35.41 billion
• Average company salary: $75,000
• 5-year stock price change: +23.4 percent

14. Disney
• Brand value: $39.87 billion
• Annual revenue: $55.14 billion
• Average company salary: $80,000
• 5-year stock price change: +76.36 percent

22. Pepsi
• Brand value: $20.80 billion
• Annual revenue: $63.53 billion
• Average company salary: $73,000
• 5-year stock price change: +33.85 percent
 
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