Splash Mountain re-theme announced

SteamboatJoe

Well-Known Member
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Listen, you're not supposed to bring up the coziness with a totalitarian nation that supports slave labor. Remember, the African American Male winning the oscar telling African folklore mythos was part of a racist, evil, anti-black movement. Stick to the woke talking points.
I appreciate you wanting to engage with my post but please don't tarnish it with rhetoric.
 

orlandogal22

Well-Known Member
I rode it and loved it. I didn't recognize it was offending people. If it is, then I have no problem with Disney making this decision. For Disney, it's a business decision, and they made it with all the implications that come with that. They decided it was worth whatever negatives there were with replacing it. I'd prefer not to offend people, and any sense of loss I have over the ride changing is eclipsed by that.

Thank you for your honest answer.

But, my point was toward someone I had direct-quoted and asked not once, not twice, but three times.
 

21stamps

Well-Known Member
I'm offended by Cinderella Castle. It represents the feminine need for a masculine savior, and supports the superiority of a ruling class over the masses.

Can we burn Cinderella Castle to the ground now?

This is exactly what I was saying earlier.. we need to bulldoze the entire park down ,and have nothing but robots if we never wish to find offense in anything.
 

_caleb

Well-Known Member
The only people who get offended are those who are looking to be offended. The point of the ride is to have fun and Disney was successful with Splash. I agree they can change it to something else and it will still be fun. My point is that the average guest doesn't give a hoot about the racial implications of the ride, because quite frankly they aren't looking for them. We are talking about a movie that the majority of guests haven't seen. So they have no preconceived context entering the ride. My kids didn't even know it was based on a movie. My kids have no clue about black voice stereotypes from the 1940's. Most people don't get off the ride thinking about race.
What if your perspective is limited and your experience is not universal? When neighbors say, "This hurts me!" what if, instead of insisting "No, it doesn't!", we listened and responded by changing the hurtful thing so that the parks are fun for everyone?

That's the approach Disney makes with guests all the time. Able-bodied people never had a problem with curbs on Main Street or stairs in the Space Mountain priority access queue, but those things really hurt the experience of people with limited mobility (a "small minority" to be sure). Disney spent a lot of money to change these sorts of things (sometimes voluntarily, sometimes by force of legal action). After a minor inconvenience to park guests, the result is that the fun is accessible to more people.

I get that you're not offended by the association between Splash Mountain and Song of the South. Lots of people aren't. But some are, and Disney sees fit to address it now. We can (and will!) disagree with their proposed solution (Princess and the Frog overlay), but can you see how these kinds of changes can result in a better experience for all?

Or at least recognize that Disney is trying to sell access to its art and being associated with racism is dangerous to their business.
 

ImperfectPixie

Well-Known Member
is this cancel culture or accountability.
This is cancel culture. Erase anything that anyone anywhere could possibly be offended by. It is not growth. It is not progress. It's erasure.

All I know is, if me, xdan, Jobu, and ImperfectPixie are all in agreement on the same subject, then... we must have the correct opinion. ;)
I don’t think that has ever happened before.

...or it’s just another crazy day in the year 2020. 😂
RIGHT?!? I don't think the four of us have EVER agreed on anything all at the same time.

You can't just ignore the movie. It's quite literally based on it. Even if they don't have any portrayals of the problematic aspects inside the ride, there are still issues. People are way more informed than they used to be. Many people already know the story behind the ride. Of those that don't, everyone knows Disney rides are almost all based on movies. Anyone that so much as google's the ride is immediately going to find out about the source. Disney can't just bury their head in the sand and pretend like things don't have context.

And yeah, the animatronics were largely recycled from the 'America Sings' ride when it closed.
Ummm...people are more informed about some things and less informed about others. The Lincoln statue in Boston being under attack even though it was paid for by freed slaves is a perfect example. The Brer characters and stories are from African folklore - and have been adapted all over the world in 14 languages.

Erasing everything from our past that people might be offended by would result in a wasteland. There will come a point at which society will have no choice but to accept that no culture in the world is guilt-free, and that history is riddled with cultures being horrible to one another.
 

WDW Pro

Well-Known Member
What if your perspective is limited and your experience is not universal? When neighbors say, "This hurts me!" what if, instead of insisting "No, it doesn't!", we listened and responded by changing the hurtful thing so that the parks are fun for everyone?

That's the approach Disney makes with guests all the time. Able-bodied people never had a problem with curbs on Main Street or stairs in the Space Mountain priority access queue, but those things really hurt the experience of people with limited mobility (a "small minority" to be sure). Disney spent a lot of money to change these sorts of things (sometimes voluntarily, sometimes by force of legal action). After a minor inconvenience to park guests, the result is that the fun is accessible to more people.

I get that you're not offended by the association between Splash Mountain and Song of the South. Lots of people aren't. But some are, and Disney sees fit to address it now. We can (and will!) disagree with their proposed solution (Princess and the Frog overlay), but can you see how these kinds of changes can result in a better experience for all?

Or at least recognize that Disney is trying to sell access to its art and being associated with racism is dangerous to their business.

How noble. Now can we get rid of Cinderella Castle? Many of us are offended and it has a controversial, sexist past.
 

_caleb

Well-Known Member
It's interesting to me that some who have shouted the loudest in agreement with this change cannot answer a simple yes / no question if they ever stood in the hot Florida sun to ride the ride on their many visits to WDW.
I haven't been shouting in agreement, but I have expressed support for the change. Yes, I have stood in the hot Florida sun (and a surprisingly cool Florida "winter") to ride Splash Mountain. I've been on DL's Splash more times than I can count. I always found the ride to be well done and very fun. I still find the ride's enduring connection to Song of the South to be a good reason to change the theme/story of the ride.
 

dolbyman

Well-Known Member
Frozen is awful. Maelstrom was far better, they should have just plussed it.

I really liked Mealstrom but it was outdated, the postshow theater movie was just propped open (we were the only ones watching it). And the attraction itself was also no that crazy busy.

Frozen on the other hand was crazy busy on our last couple of trips.. So from a business standpoint it made sense (lots of extra visitors just for that attraction alone).. and I have to say i love the animatronics ..

The question if Disney IP should be added all over Epcot is another one. I think when EPCOT was new(80s,90s), people had a much harder time to find out about innovation, discoveries and distant countries. Now everything is at your fingertips (literally).

Do I like EPCOT losing it's futuristic educational vibe ? No!
Do I understand Disneys decision to do it ? Yes!

Anyways.. sorry for drifting away from the topic.
 

RCID

Member
I’m also offended that Japan treated American POW’s so horribly....yet Disney celebrates their history with a world Showcase pavilion!!!
(This is sarcasm to illustrate a point about where this is all headed...)
 

CinematicFusion

Well-Known Member
I have provided an example of elements in Splash Mountain that are offensive to me in previous posts. You not being offended doesn't mean someone else cannot be. And before the rebuttal of ppl are too sensitive is spoken...what right do you have to tell someone how to feel? Just saying.

Can you re-post again so I can see. I've never seen anything that offended me on that ride. This is the first time I've ever heard someone being offended by that ride. 90s,00s,10,s.....30 year old ride. Definition of classic.

What hurt you the most the first time you rode it? Did you ever ride it again? Did you complain instantly that day when you rode it on this board? I'm just curious.
 

orlandogal22

Well-Known Member
I haven't been shouting in agreement, but I have expressed support for the change. Yes, I have stood in the hot Florida sun (and a surprisingly cool Florida "winter") to ride Splash Mountain. I've been on DL's Splash more times than I can count. I always found the ride to be well done and very fun. I still find the ride's enduring connection to Song of the South to be a good reason to change the theme/story of the ride.

Thank you, as well, for your honest answer. I especially appreciate that you stated you ENJOYED the ride.

I believe that many on this board are leading us to believe they never rode the ride, never enjoyed the ride, and have completely been against the ride since its inception. Many of whom cannot point to one specific instance while riding the ride where they felt threatened, saddened, or outraged. We can all agree the source material - whether or not one states it's Uncle Remus or SotS - is controversial; we can also agree that the ride is - in and of itself and taken on its own merits - not.
 

_caleb

Well-Known Member
How noble. Now can we get rid of Cinderella Castle? Many of us are offended and it has a controversial, sexist past.
I'm not trying to be noble. I'm trying to participate in conversation about a theme park ride with fellow fans of the theme parks. I don't understand the snide, mocking tone people keep taking. Don't you want to have a conversation?

I honestly would be interested to know your actual thoughts on Disney's responsibility to respond to social pressures. As an insider in the entertainment business, surely you can see the challenges of public backlash (in any direction). It seems clear to me that you don't think Disney should change Splash Mountain, but do you think there's ever a time to react/respond to public outcry? If so, what would be the determining factor for you?
 

Phicinfan

Well-Known Member
I can't believe people aren't up in arms that Princess Tiana is getting the refurb treatment. The paste-on, half-***, re-decorate treatment.
Shouldn't she be getting the state of the art new ride? Wouldn't that be more of a statement from Walt Disney?
Yes and no.
Yes, she deserves a new ride, but No, since they have dire need to refurbish Splash due to potential risk with current theme, and they can use a much needed new IP in the park that addesses the key issue
 

orlandogal22

Well-Known Member
I'm not trying to be noble. I'm trying to participate in conversation about a theme park ride with fellow fans of the theme parks. I don't understand the snide, mocking tone people keep taking. Don't you want to have a conversation?

I honestly would be interested to know your actual thoughts on Disney's responsibility to respond to social pressures. As an insider in the entertainment business, surely you can see the challenges of public backlash (in any direction). It seems clear to me that you don't think Disney should change Splash Mountain, but do you think there's ever a time to react/respond to public outcry? If so, what would be the determining factor for you?

I am saddened by the decision. That being said, I also absolutely would love a Tiana attraction. Just not to cancel out the other.

I believe what many are finding issue with is the timing. Why now. Why in the middle of COVID-19. Why in the middle of a time when the parks aren't even open. Why when they're involved in countless other park overhauls, ride overhauls, new builds, etc. Why when it's possible CMs jobs will be cut. It only points to one answer. A knee-jerk reaction based on current events.
 

The_Jobu

Well-Known Member
What if your perspective is limited and your experience is not universal? When neighbors say, "This hurts me!" what if, instead of insisting "No, it doesn't!", we listened and responded by changing the hurtful thing so that the parks are fun for everyone?

That's the approach Disney makes with guests all the time. Able-bodied people never had a problem with curbs on Main Street or stairs in the Space Mountain priority access queue, but those things really hurt the experience of people with limited mobility (a "small minority" to be sure). Disney spent a lot of money to change these sorts of things (sometimes voluntarily, sometimes by force of legal action). After a minor inconvenience to park guests, the result is that the fun is accessible to more people.

I get that you're not offended by the association between Splash Mountain and Song of the South. Lots of people aren't. But some are, and Disney sees fit to address it now. We can (and will!) disagree with their proposed solution (Princess and the Frog overlay), but can you see how these kinds of changes can result in a better experience for all?

Or at least recognize that Disney is trying to sell access to its art and being associated with racism is dangerous to their business.

I appreciate your points, please allow me to make a sub-point.

Splash Mountain isn't hurting anyone, it's association with a film is what is upsetting. We can already see how this is a much murkier territory than people who physically are unable to go on a ride. For example, you say this leads to a better experience for all, but I fail to see how that is the case. A group of people (at least equal to the ones that are offended) are saying this will drastically decrease their experience with a beloved ride.

Now, it is a completely subjective value, but how many people need to be offended before it demands action? That cant be answered, hence debate.

This also brings up other difficult questions. Can good art come from bad art? Is it better to build something new and keep it next to the old, or must one be torn down? This doesn't even approach questions such as Disney's legitimacy in their anti-racism statements when they continue to do flagrantly racist things in other countries, as long as it brings them more money. Hypocrisy deeply upsets some people.

I appreciate your perspective, thank you for reading my own.
 
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