RUMOR: Lin Manuel Miranda and Weird Al to Redo Hall of Presidents

UNCgolf

Well-Known Member
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No one should, but there are an awful lot more people walking out of the Broadway show acting like they just completed a doctoral thesis than walking out of Pocahontas pretending they are authorities on Native American history. And not many performances of the other examples were delayed so the performers could chastise people in the audience that they disagree with politically.

I don't think anyone has to worry about the Hall of Presidents AAs delaying their performance to chastise the audience.
 
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TrainChasers

Well-Known Member
And not many performances of the other examples were delayed so the performers could chastise people in the audience that they disagree with politically.

The performance was not delayed... it was a post-show comment at curtain call which is very common on broadway (happens nightly during equity fights aids month). This is what was said -

“We, sir — we — are the diverse America who are alarmed and anxious that your new administration will not protect us, our planet, our children, our parents, or defend us and uphold our inalienable rights. We truly hope that this show has inspired you to uphold our American values and to work on behalf of all of us.”
 

DisneyCane

Well-Known Member
The current version is probably the best version of the attraction and it's basically "Great moments in presidential speeches".
I finally experienced HOP last week for the first time in probably over 30 years. I figured with the reduced crowds nobody would boo a robot figure so I could enjoy the show. Nobody did and the show was just ok. A little boring. Honestly, I enjoy American Adventure more.

Making it more entertaining would be an improvement. Also, none of the AAs of recent presidents look all that much like they do (or did at inauguration).
 

_caleb

Well-Known Member
I finally experienced HOP last week for the first time in probably over 30 years. I figured with the reduced crowds nobody would boo a robot figure so I could enjoy the show. Nobody did and the show was just ok. A little boring. Honestly, I enjoy American Adventure more.

Making it more entertaining would be an improvement. Also, none of the AAs of recent presidents look all that much like they do (or did at inauguration).
And there’s the challenge- almost anything you do to make history more interesting to theme park guests will push into “too political!” “Don’t lecture me!” and “revisionist history!” territory.
 

larryz

Today's Maytag Repairman
Premium Member
And there’s the challenge- almost anything you do to make history more interesting to theme park guests will push into “too political!” “Don’t lecture me!” and “revisionist history!” territory.
So that's when you get breakdancing Lincoln and Rapping Roosevelt.
 

MickeyMouse10

Well-Known Member
I'd rather see Bill and Ted run the Hall of Presidents than Lin and Al. Either that or the talent show scene from "Revenge of the Nerds".

 

_caleb

Well-Known Member
Lin Manuel Miranda used creative license to make the story of America’s Founding Fathers more dramatic and interesting to Broadway audiences. He definitely did his homework as he wrote the musical. Some of the things he changed (like giving Schuyler 3 daughters and no sons) were convenient to the plot and served the smaller cast.

To me, these things are less “revisionist” than having Abraham Lincoln fail to mention slavery (Great Moments), or even having Mark Twain and Ben Franklin appear as contemporaries (American Adventure).
 

SoFloMagic

Well-Known Member
Lin Manuel Miranda used creative license to make the story of America’s Founding Fathers more dramatic and interesting to Broadway audiences. He definitely did his homework as he wrote the musical. Some of the things he changed (like giving Schuyler 3 daughters and no sons) were convenient to the plot and served the smaller cast.

To me, these things are less “revisionist” than having Abraham Lincoln fail to mention slavery (Great Moments), or even having Mark Twain and Ben Franklin appear as contemporaries (American Adventure).
This. It's not revisionist to write a musical drama about history. Its not a high school class, it's a piece of art based on history.
 

RobWDW1971

Well-Known Member
Lin Manuel Miranda used creative license to make the story of America’s Founding Fathers more dramatic and interesting to Broadway audiences. He definitely did his homework as he wrote the musical. Some of the things he changed (like giving Schuyler 3 daughters and no sons) were convenient to the plot and served the smaller cast.

To me, these things are less “revisionist” than having Abraham Lincoln fail to mention slavery (Great Moments), or even having Mark Twain and Ben Franklin appear as contemporaries (American Adventure).

Uh, what? I assume you have never seen the show. They are out of time - both commenting about each other's eras and acknowledging they are currently in the 20th Century.


Ben Franklin:
Perhaps you recognize those inspiring words from one of America's great writers.

Mark Twain:
No, Dr. Franklin, I don't recall writing anything like that.

Ben Franklin:
Oh my, of course not.
They're from the pen of John Steinbeck here in the 20th century.
Why it seems he has nearly the same spirit as the founding fathers themselves.

Mark Twain:
Well, listen to the proud elder statesman.

Ben Franklin:
Mr. Twain, pride is one of our national passions.
Even those who overcome it, are proud of their humility.

Mark Twain:
Easy now, I was born modest.
Fortunately, it wore off.

Ben Franklin:
Hoho.

Mark Twain:
Dr. Franklin, as our genuine American antique, I suppose our story begins with you.
 

TrainChasers

Well-Known Member
Lin Manuel Miranda used creative license to make the story of America’s Founding Fathers more dramatic and interesting to Broadway audiences. He definitely did his homework as he wrote the musical. Some of the things he changed (like giving Schuyler 3 daughters and no sons) were convenient to the plot and served the smaller cast.

To me, these things are less “revisionist” than having Abraham Lincoln fail to mention slavery (Great Moments), or even having Mark Twain and Ben Franklin appear as contemporaries (American Adventure).

That’s why I keep asking what people have against the musical... does it really bother them that Aaron Burr wasn’t present at the duel with Lee?
 
Or is it that the musical (which I think is great BTW) panders to the audience pretending a lily white (from British/French/Scottish parents) British citizen who left one British territory to come to another British territory would be referred to as "an immigrant" in 1775? But hey, the audience hoots every time on that line so you have that.

It's an allegory for current events, really. I don't think it panders; it's just unsubtle with its metaphors.
 

TrainChasers

Well-Known Member
Or is it that the musical (which I think is great BTW) panders to the audience pretending a lily white (from British/French/Scottish parents) British citizen who left one British territory to come to another British territory would be referred to as "an immigrant" in 1775? But hey, the audience hoots every time on that line so you have that.

See now we are talking! If you’re going to criticize something know why you are criticizing it.
 

doctornick

Well-Known Member
That actually makes it worse - it panders in the worst way as it plays on the ignorance of the audience about his actual heritage. Not sure how a white British citizen moving to another British colony legally and working his way up in the system solely due to his effort and abilities is an "allegory" of anything in current events. In fact, it is most likely the exact opposite of the reason the audience cheers if they thought about it for a second instead of reacting like seals clapping being triggered by the word "immigrant".

I dunno. Is it really different from someone coming from Puerto Rico to one of the 50 states today for job opportunities? Yes, not a true "immigrant" but certainly involving some of the same challenges.
 

TrainChasers

Well-Known Member
That actually makes it worse - it panders in the worst way as it plays on the ignorance of the audience about his actual heritage. Not sure how a white British citizen moving to another British colony legally and working his way up in the system solely due to his effort and abilities is an "allegory" of anything in current events. In fact, it is most likely the exact opposite of the reason the audience cheers if they thought about it for a second instead of reacting like seals clapping being triggered by the word "immigrant".

Eh... he was an immigrant though by definition. The very first line says he was the son of a Scotsman so it’s not like they aren’t mentioning that.
 
If you think the average person walks out of that show thinking he was a white British citizen who legally moved from one British colony to another British colony, I have some mid-orchestra seats for tomorrow night's show to sell ya. And again, this is from someone who loves the show and has seen it multiple times. But that line is straight up pandering for the reaction.

I'm not claiming you don't like the show! Just saying it's a heavy-handed metaphor. Lin's family is from Puerto Rico (an American colony, moving to America) so it's similar. You're right though, by definition Hamilton was not an immigrant. But it's not trying to be a direct parallel. It's a metaphor. Yes Hamilton and the Mirandas moved intra-nationally but is that really that different from immigration? AND Hamilton is talking to Lafayette, who was an immigrant. So consider it a moment of solidarity from two people who traveled to continental America, as a shout-out to modern day travelers.

You're right, it's a crowd-pleasing line. It bends the strict meaning of words a bit to achieve its goal. Artistic license.

I didn't want anybody to change HOP anyways.
 
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