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News Remy's Ratatouille Adventure coming to Epcot

Bambilu Sparkler

New Member
Awesome, Epcot is in dire need of attractions. Each WS Pavillion needs a ride in my opinion.
For my family, Epcot is a respite from all the long lines around rides at Magic Kingdom. I don't mind one or two ( my daughterhas been toParis Disney and said this ride was definitely the highlight of the trip), but every pavilion? That would be awful - would ruin the flow from country to country.

Not everyone goes to WDW for the rides. And those who go only for the rides? Boy, do they miss out. WDW is full of other great things to do ( and yes, I love the rides too)
 

Rich Brownn

Well-Known Member
For my family, Epcot is a respite from all the long lines around rides at Magic Kingdom. I don't mind one or two ( my daughterhas been toParis Disney and said this ride was definitely the highlight of the trip), but every pavilion? That would be awful - would ruin the flow from country to country.

Not everyone goes to WDW for the rides. And those who go only for the rides? Boy, do they miss out. WDW is full of other great things to do ( and yes, I love the rides too)
All of the countries were supposed to have rides -- some announced and never built (Germany for example).
 

doctornick

Well-Known Member
All of the countries were supposed to have rides -- some announced and never built (Germany for example).
Well the intention was for all of the pavilions to have attractions. Not all would be rides, though, as there is/would be stuff like American Adventure and the Circle Vision films.

I do think WS needs a few more major attractions to round it out. Ratatouille is a good start but also doing something in say Japan and Germany or Italy would really fill in the gaps.
 

J4546

Well-Known Member
how cool would it be if they put in another soarin attraction behind germany pav, a soarin over castles experience thats like 6-7 minutes of you flying over and learning about castles
 

tommcp516

Well-Known Member
Most of the threads on here consist of people quoting you, despite your tagline.

I assume you mean second half of the calendar year, not fiscal year. I think (to quote you and others) the ride does not need much to be ready, so the delay is based on staffing and timing of when a new ride could have maximum impact from an attendance standpoint. So does that mean that Disney thinks it will be late in 2021 before they're able to open up the capacity limits (at the earliest)?
If the estimated delay for opening is truly the second half of 2021, then it seems odd that there's been a bunch of updates recently which sounded like they were the 'finishing touches': completion of the kiosk outside, further painting detail on the exterior wall, the illumination of the signs above the entrance, and the mentioning of it during the recent Thanksgiving special.

If there is to be a long delay, I really hope that its not for the reason highlighted in the second part of the sentence above: timing for maximum impact. If all of the work on the ride is completed and management decides to mothball an otherwise functional attraction for six months or more, that would be a slap in the face to all of the Disney customers who are traveling to WDW during the first part of 2021(even with covid still being an issue) to provide much needed revenue and who will be facing likely increased crowd sizes at Epcot (due to parkhopping towards the afternoon/evening) with a perfectly good ride sitting dormant just to 'wow' the people coming for the 50th anniversary in the fall.
 
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TiggerDad

Well-Known Member
If the estimated delay for opening is truly the second half of 2021, then it seems odd that there's been a bunch of updates recently which sounded like they were the 'finishing touches': completion of the kiosk outside, further painting detail on the exterior wall, the illumination of the signs above the entrance, and the mentioning of it during the recent Thanksgiving special.

If there is to be a long delay, I really hope that its not for the reason highlighted in the second part of the sentence above: timing for maximum impact. If all of the work on the ride is completed and management decides to mothball an otherwise functional attraction for six months or more, that would be a slap in the face to all of the Disney customers who are traveling to WDW during the first part of 2021(even with covid still being an issue) to provide much needed revenue and who will be facing likely increased crowd sizes at Epcot (due to parkhopping towards the afternoon/evening) with a perfectly good ride sitting dormant just to 'wow' the people coming for the 50th anniversary in the fall.
I do not have any insight into the timing, but it's pretty clear that you have a trip planned for the first part of 2021, and that you seem incapable of looking at things from anything other than the perspective of what's best for you personally.

From Disney's perspective, they have a cap on how many visitors they can accommodate. They anticipate that cap will go away at some point in the future, at which point, they will want to really boost attendance at that point. There is no need to boost attendance right now. Given those facts, why on earth would they open their biggest available attraction right now versus waiting until it could drive attendance?

If you don't want to be slapped in the face, then maybe you should stay home until everything is open.
 

tommcp516

Well-Known Member
I do not have any insight into the timing, but it's pretty clear that you have a trip planned for the first part of 2021, and that you seem incapable of looking at things from anything other than the perspective of what's best for you personally.

From Disney's perspective, they have a cap on how many visitors they can accommodate. They anticipate that cap will go away at some point in the future, at which point, they will want to really boost attendance at that point. There is no need to boost attendance right now. Given those facts, why on earth would they open their biggest available attraction right now versus waiting until it could drive attendance?

If you don't want to be slapped in the face, then maybe you should stay home until everything is open.
First of all--you may be a 'Well-Known Member' according to your avatar--but you know nothing about me or my capability of looking at things from other perspectives, and your tone and personal comments were completely uncalled for.

I fully appreciate the logistical considerations that would go into desired attendance levels vs current visitor accommodation levels. My point (not in any way directed towards you, btw) was that there seemed to be a lot of recent activity around the attraction: announcing in November at the IAAPA Expo that it would be opening in 2021, followed by a 'sneak peak' video, and work crews photographed completing the kiosk, adding finishing touches to the exterior artwork, and illuminating the signs at night WHILE THE PARK WAS STILL OPEN.

So to respond to your comments--if their plan is truly to "boost" and "drive attendance" in the late summer or fall--why on earth would they take all of these steps now and then have everything--including the electronic/lighting displays--sit dormant for all of those months, after they've raised some expectation in guests that the opening of their biggest available attraction might be right around the corner?
 
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lazyboy97o

Well-Known Member
First of all--you may be a 'Well-Known Member' according to your avatar--but you know nothing about me or my capability of looking at things from other perspectives, and your comment and tone about being slapped in the face was completely uncalled for.

I fully appreciate the logistical considerations that would go into desired attendance levels vs current visitor accommodation levels. My point (not in any way directed towards you, btw) was that there seemed to be a lot of recent activity around the attraction: announcing in November at the IAAPA Expo that it would be opening in 2021, followed by a 'sneak peak' video, and work crews photographed completing the kiosk, adding finishing touches to the exterior artwork, and illuminating the signs at night WHILE THE PARK WAS STILL OPEN.

So to respond to your comments--if their plan is truly to "boost" and "drive attendance" in the late summer or fall--why on earth would they take all of these steps now and then have everything--including the electronic/lighting displays--sit dormant for all of those months, after they've raised some expectation in guests that the opening of their biggest available attraction might be right around the corner?
You’re the one who invoked the slap in the face comment...

The reason work is being finished now is because it is easier and cheaper to just finish it than try to figure out a way to leave it unfinished.
 

puckett26

Member
Considering WDW’s operating track record with new big ticket attractions, I would open it while crowds are low to ensure the attraction is not breaking down multiple times per day when crowds return to normal. It’s not cheap to sit on a nearly completed project of this magnitude. It may potentially increase revenues at Epcot to the extent it helps sell park passes that would otherwise be available. Especially by forcing people through world showcase where I spend more money than I should each visit. Why not get some return on investment now and still drive future demand?

I believe WDW is approaching a value bubble that may burst in the future jf prices continue rising at recent paces. The WDW on site experience is not offering value that is correlating with sky rocketing prices. The value is predominantly being lost at the resorts. The lack of frequent (included) transportation and amenities that would justify the room rate are sometimes non existent. Combine that with parks that are not being maintained to past standards and poorly managing capacity - people like myself who absolutely love WDW start to question the cost and alternatives. Spending thousands of dollars more than alternative vacation options (although less desirable) without a guarantee that you get to experience all of the top attractions and grossly overpay for room rates is starting to blow holes through vacation budgeting. Just my opinion don’t tar and feather me folks.
 

brihow

Well-Known Member
Considering WDW’s operating track record with new big ticket attractions, I would open it while crowds are low to ensure the attraction is not breaking down multiple times per day when crowds return to normal. It’s not cheap to sit on a nearly completed project of this magnitude. It may potentially increase revenues at Epcot to the extent it helps sell park passes that would otherwise be available. Especially by forcing people through world showcase where I spend more money than I should each visit. Why not get some return on investment now and still drive future demand?

I believe WDW is approaching a value bubble that may burst in the future jf prices continue rising at recent paces. The WDW on site experience is not offering value that is correlating with sky rocketing prices. The value is predominantly being lost at the resorts. The lack of frequent (included) transportation and amenities that would justify the room rate are sometimes non existent. Combine that with parks that are not being maintained to past standards and poorly managing capacity - people like myself who absolutely love WDW start to question the cost and alternatives. Spending thousands of dollars more than alternative vacation options (although less desirable) without a guarantee that you get to experience all of the top attractions and grossly overpay for room rates is starting to blow holes through vacation budgeting. Just my opinion don’t tar and feather me folks.
I used to go to WDW every year and haven't been back in 4 years and don't plan on returning for another few years. There is a huge part of me that loves Disney and going to the parks, but the disappointing experience of my last trip combined with all of the recent demolition doesn't really interest me. I don't know if I'm the exception or the rule but I would rather spend my money elsewhere, for now at least.
 

MisterPenguin

Rumormonger
Premium Member
I believe WDW is approaching a value bubble that may burst in the future jf prices continue rising at recent paces. The WDW on site experience is not offering value that is correlating with sky rocketing prices. The value is predominantly being lost at the resorts. The lack of frequent (included) transportation and amenities that would justify the room rate are sometimes non existent. Combine that with parks that are not being maintained to past standards and poorly managing capacity - people like myself who absolutely love WDW start to question the cost and alternatives. Spending thousands of dollars more than alternative vacation options (although less desirable) without a guarantee that you get to experience all of the top attractions and grossly overpay for room rates is starting to blow holes through vacation budgeting. Just my opinion don’t tar and feather me folks.

We're not anywhere near that bursting bubble. Disney has been tightening budgets and raising prices aggressively for WDW with the purposeful intent of reducing the number of guests that show up during peak times. Just look at how day-ticket prices fluctuate by what days you plan to attend.

WDW, especially MK, has an overcrowding problem. They don't want more guests. They want the same or even less guests that pay even more per person. (What business doesn't want that?)

Iger himself on a quarterly call said that guest satisfaction goes down on very crowded days. That hurts the brand. That hurts long term attachment and repeat business. That hurts people's willingness to spend even more when they're at the park.

Until they can build up more capacity, especially at the three under-utilized parks and make them more attractive to pull people from MK, WDW will continue to raise prices. And they'll do so, because they can. They've been doing it for years and the numbers continue to grow. They'll keeping raising prices until they find that breaking point.

Disney can't run the parks at a price point that everyone can afford, otherwise, there would be 200 million people visiting every year, and MK would be as crowded every day of the year as they are during Christmas week... and they can't handle that. Short of a permanent reservation system, the only control on stopping overcrowding is raising prices. And it looks like we're still nowhere near that breaking point.
 

puckett26

Member
I used to go to WDW every year and haven't been back in 4 years and don't plan on returning for another few years. There is a huge part of me that loves Disney and going to the parks, but the disappointing experience of my last trip combined with all of the recent demolition doesn't really interest me. I don't know if I'm the exception or the rule but I would rather spend my money elsewhere, for now at least.
We used to go every two years and were planning to go in 2021 after all of the park enhancements and attractions were complete. Our last trip was 2018 and the park experience was fine but the cost swelling was more apparent. Now that these attractions are being pushed and pricing will inflate more than it needs to, I am not sure about visiting in 2021 or 2022. In 2018, there was no question at all, and with a family of 5, we appreciate discounts such as free dining. Which brings up another issue because WDW continues to diminish the savings value from discount packages that adds to the “bubble.”
 

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