• Welcome to the WDWMAGIC.COM Forums!
    Please take a look around, and feel free to sign up and join the community.You can use your Twitter or Facebook account to sign up, or register directly.

News Primeval Whirl at Disney's Animal Kingdom experiencing extended downtime

lazyboy97o

Well-Known Member
Interesting since it's the same ride layout..It does bring up the mystery that they are trying to keep this on life support as the company Reverchon Industries who made PEW went bankrupt 11 years ago...
Vekoma filed for bankruptcy 18 years ago and they’re building two coasters at Walt Disney World. Reverchon is still in business.
 

Rich Brownn

Well-Known Member
Advertisement
They should ask Fun Spot....They have the exact same ride ....Minus the theming.
Same Type, different manufacturer. The one at Fun Spot is made by Zamperia and was a transfer from Cypress Gardens. Disney's is made by Reverchon. Probably explains why Fun Spot's spins a lot more.
 

lazyboy97o

Well-Known Member
How? It states in 2008 Reverchon went into Bankruptcy?
Most companies emerge from Chapter 11 in 18-36 months. In most cases the corporation survives in some shape or form. If not, a creditor or other party will usually buy the assets and IP of the debtor company out of bankruptcy (think the new Hostess/Twinkies bakery), which may include ongoing service contracts (like presumably WDW would have). It’s rare that an ongoing relationship like that would just get stranded.
 

frankc

Member
Most companies emerge from Chapter 11 in 18-36 months. In most cases the corporation survives in some shape or form. If not, a creditor or other party will usually buy the assets and IP of the debtor company out of bankruptcy (think the new Hostess/Twinkies bakery), which may include ongoing service contracts (like presumably WDW would have). It’s rare that an ongoing relationship like that would just get stranded.
Chapter 7 is for liquidation, chapter 11 is for restructure and continue in some form
 

Absimilliard

Well-Known Member
I think the Wikipedia article is inaccurate and needs updating.
It does. As a french speaker, that article is very inaccurate and does not reflect what happened at all. Reverchon is still in business, has an active website Reverchon and they delivered a coaster this year to a park in France. They are very well alive, but most bloggers forget they exist since they only exhibit at the IAAPA Expo Europe show and don't come to Orlando for IAAPA Expo in November. I am looking forward to talking with them for the first time next month in Paris.

As for the coaster at Fun Spot America, that one happened after a very strange situation. For the 2004 season, Zamperla and Reverchon had signed an agreement where Zamperla would market spinning coasters to foreign parks and two were sold: Raging Cajun at Six Flags Great America near Chicago (moved to Six Flags America between Baltimore and Washington, DC) and Crazy Mouse at Del Grosso's Amusement Park in Pennsylvania. During the construction phase of those, Reverchon went into the equivalent of Chapter 11, leading Zamperla to finish the rides. So, you have Reverchon built track and cars with Zamperla components and controls. After that, Zamperla oddly started selling their version of the Spinning Coaster with their own style of cars while Reverchon still manufacture the original after reorganizing.

The argument that you can't get spare parts if a ride manufacturer goes bankrupt is false. If parks with Schwarzkopf coasters, like the Scorpion at Busch Gardens Tampa, can still get parts for their rides when Schwarzkopf went bankrupt as a company in the mid 1980's, where is the issue? The Big Apple Coaster in Las Vegas is an orphan ride now with the last one of its manufacturer left in the western world, the american office of that company closing in 2001, etc. Yet, they do modifications to the ride, got replacement trains (from Premier Rides), upgraded the braking system, etc. There are a few companies that will help parks with rides like that, so no ride is truly left alone. Its all a matter of finding the right partner and how important the ride is to the park since it will determine how much the park is willing to spend on it.
 

TJ Vazquez

Well-Known Member
It does. As a french speaker, that article is very inaccurate and does not reflect what happened at all. Reverchon is still in business, has an active website Reverchon and they delivered a coaster this year to a park in France. They are very well alive, but most bloggers forget they exist since they only exhibit at the IAAPA Expo Europe show and don't come to Orlando for IAAPA Expo in November. I am looking forward to talking with them for the first time next month in Paris.

As for the coaster at Fun Spot America, that one happened after a very strange situation. For the 2004 season, Zamperla and Reverchon had signed an agreement where Zamperla would market spinning coasters to foreign parks and two were sold: Raging Cajun at Six Flags Great America near Chicago (moved to Six Flags America between Baltimore and Washington, DC) and Crazy Mouse at Del Grosso's Amusement Park in Pennsylvania. During the construction phase of those, Reverchon went into the equivalent of Chapter 11, leading Zamperla to finish the rides. So, you have Reverchon built track and cars with Zamperla components and controls. After that, Zamperla oddly started selling their version of the Spinning Coaster with their own style of cars while Reverchon still manufacture the original after reorganizing.

The argument that you can't get spare parts if a ride manufacturer goes bankrupt is false. If parks with Schwarzkopf coasters, like the Scorpion at Busch Gardens Tampa, can still get parts for their rides when Schwarzkopf went bankrupt as a company in the mid 1980's, where is the issue? The Big Apple Coaster in Las Vegas is an orphan ride now with the last one of its manufacturer left in the western world, the american office of that company closing in 2001, etc. Yet, they do modifications to the ride, got replacement trains (from Premier Rides), upgraded the braking system, etc. There are a few companies that will help parks with rides like that, so no ride is truly left alone. Its all a matter of finding the right partner and how important the ride is to the park since it will determine how much the park is willing to spend on it.
Interesting, thanks for the education. 👍
 

MiddKid

Well-Known Member
Someone mentioned slower spinning...don't forget, Disney slows this ride down WAY more than the manufacturer intended. Some background:

The first ever Reverchon Crazy Mouse was at Dinosaur Beach in Wildwood, NJ and I was lucky enough to ride it opening year. Not only did it spin something fierce, I attended a coaster event there and if you ask nicely the ride operator can "pull the pin" in the station and you can spin throughout the entire ride. Some super crazy rides doing the top section with spinning! When I rode PW for the first time I was shocked to see how much Disney braked it.

Just for fun tonight I compared two videos and you can see for yourself. That same original Crazy Mouse operates at Steel Pier in Atlantic City, NJ and I took a video of that cresting the hill and compared it to a video of PW cresting the hill. Disclaimer, I've never used this site before, but it seems to be working:

If it doesn't work, compare these to videos on your own:

Yes, weight can make a difference, but you'll clearly see the numerous times that the PW brakes kick in to slow it down. The Crazy Mouse hits the drops going significantly faster and finishes about 10-15 seconds before PW. Accordingly, the Crazy Mouse spins a lot more too (admittedly highly dependent on weight distribution).

In case you're curious, Disney does the same thing with Goofy's Sky School at DCA. It runs significantly slower than the standard model.
 

wishiwere@wdw

Well-Known Member
Someone mentioned slower spinning...don't forget, Disney slows this ride down WAY more than the manufacturer intended. Some background:

The first ever Reverchon Crazy Mouse was at Dinosaur Beach in Wildwood, NJ and I was lucky enough to ride it opening year. Not only did it spin something fierce, I attended a coaster event there and if you ask nicely the ride operator can "pull the pin" in the station and you can spin throughout the entire ride. Some super crazy rides doing the top section with spinning! When I rode PW for the first time I was shocked to see how much Disney braked it.

Just for fun tonight I compared two videos and you can see for yourself. That same original Crazy Mouse operates at Steel Pier in Atlantic City, NJ and I took a video of that cresting the hill and compared it to a video of PW cresting the hill. Disclaimer, I've never used this site before, but it seems to be working:

If it doesn't work, compare these to videos on your own:

Yes, weight can make a difference, but you'll clearly see the numerous times that the PW brakes kick in to slow it down. The Crazy Mouse hits the drops going significantly faster and finishes about 10-15 seconds before PW. Accordingly, the Crazy Mouse spins a lot more too (admittedly highly dependent on weight distribution).

In case you're curious, Disney does the same thing with Goofy's Sky School at DCA. It runs significantly slower than the standard model.
Great information and thanks for sharing.

I wanted to add one additional variable that comes into play... capacity.

The number of ride vehicles combined with how fast operations are pushing them through can also impact the amount of braking.

For example, I was very surprised of how little spinning Laff Trakk at Hershey Park does (still love it!) as compared to its identical twin at the Santa Cruz Beach Boardwalk (although outdoors). The explanation I received, direct from the manufacturer, is that the west coast ride simply had fewer trains operating and therefore was braking less. As a result, there was much more spinning as the course was being taken at a higher speed. I suspect, knowing Steel Pier as I do, that this could have been a similar scenario. Meanwhile, Disney, to their credit, does typically run their coasters at or near maximum throughout.
 

rle4lunch

Well-Known Member
Retheme of dino land probably being announced 22Aug. This ride will most likely never open again. Hopefully.
 

MiddKid

Well-Known Member
Great information and thanks for sharing.

I wanted to add one additional variable that comes into play... capacity.

The number of ride vehicles combined with how fast operations are pushing them through can also impact the amount of braking.

For example, I was very surprised of how little spinning Laff Trakk at Hershey Park does (still love it!) as compared to its identical twin at the Santa Cruz Beach Boardwalk (although outdoors). The explanation I received, direct from the manufacturer, is that the west coast ride simply had fewer trains operating and therefore was braking less. As a result, there was much more spinning as the course was being taken at a higher speed. I suspect, knowing Steel Pier as I do, that this could have been a similar scenario. Meanwhile, Disney, to their credit, does typically run their coasters at or near maximum throughout.
Great point that I forgot to mention!
 
Top Bottom