• Welcome to the WDWMAGIC.COM Forums!
    Please take a look around, and feel free to sign up and join the community.You can use your Twitter or Facebook account to sign up, or register directly.

Rumor Pixar's Coco coming to the Mexico Pavilion

Touchdown

Well-Known Member
Except the story is one of the few IPs that belongs in Epcot. For a thematic fit, it's substantially better than Three Caballeros.
I would say it’s on par with Three Caballeros, but you know what would be great, redo the Mexico ride to be Coco. Then take the birds and have them go on a trip to Jose’s homeland and use them in a brand new Brazil ride which, along with a Brazilian Steakhouse, would make for an amazing new pavilion. They could even reuse the AAs in the finale.
 

Brer Oswald

Well-Known Member
Those who say Coco fits better as an IP clearly haven’t seen Three Caballeros. Half of that film is just a culture lesson. The other half is Donald trying to get some at different parties.

The issue is what they chose to focus the ride on. But do we really think Coco would be that different? The plot would probably be finding a missing guitar or something. Unless we are having Saludos Amigos in Brazil, keep it. Both IPs fit just fine.
 

Sir_Cliff

Well-Known Member
Those who say Coco fits better as an IP clearly haven’t seen Three Caballeros. Half of that film is just a culture lesson. The other half is Donald trying to get some at different parties.

The issue is what they chose to focus the ride on. But do we really think Coco would be that different? The plot would probably be finding a missing guitar or something. Unless we are having Saludos Amigos in Brazil, keep it. Both IPs fit just fine.
I think its more that Three Caballeros is a 1940s Hollywood attempt at portraying other cultures (Mexico being one of them) that received a mixed response, whereas Coco is a 21st century attempt to portray Mexican culture received an overwhelmingly positive response in Mexico and elsewhere.

I am in Mexico City right now, and I can tell you that I see Coco things around every day on newsstands, piñatas, etc. Not sure I've ever seen any reference to the Three Caballeros in all my years of coming here outside of an exhibit at the Cineteca Nacional about Walt Disney and Mexico that was held to celebrate the release of Coco. In other words, I don't think many Mexicans feel their culture is particularly represented by the Three Caballeros whereas many feel exactly that way about Coco.
 

the.dreamfinder

Well-Known Member
Except the story is one of the few IPs that belongs in Epcot. For a thematic fit, it's substantially better than Three Caballeros.
But it’s inappropriate for anything more than a seasonal overlay of that ride.

If they cared about fan buy in, they’d revert to El Rio and do a Coco overlay for the fall.
 

Brer Oswald

Well-Known Member
I think its more that Three Caballeros is a 1940s Hollywood attempt at portraying other cultures (Mexico being one of them) that received a mixed response, whereas Coco is a 21st century attempt to portray Mexican culture received an overwhelmingly positive response in Mexico and elsewhere.

I am in Mexico City right now, and I can tell you that I see Coco things around every day on newsstands, piñatas, etc. Not sure I've ever seen any reference to the Three Caballeros in all my years of coming here outside of an exhibit at the Cineteca Nacional about Walt Disney and Mexico that was held to celebrate the release of Coco. In other words, I don't think many Mexicans feel their culture is particularly represented by the Three Caballeros whereas many feel exactly that way about Coco.
Call it what you want. Caballeros goes into detail on real Mexican celebrations, dances, etc. Coco is a fantasized take on what Mexican culture believes happens to the dead. And that’s likely why it was received better. It’s more fantasy. People enjoy fantasy. I’m just surprised because usually, the board is against fantasy in World Showcase.
 

Sir_Cliff

Well-Known Member
Call it what you want. Caballeros goes into detail on real Mexican celebrations, dances, etc. Coco is a fantasized take on what Mexican culture believes happens to the dead. And that’s likely why it was received better. It’s more fantasy. People enjoy fantasy. I’m just surprised because usually, the board is against fantasy in World Showcase.
Ok, I'll let the people of Mexico know they've got it all backwards.
 

Sir_Cliff

Well-Known Member
So...I don’t really care if people think it fits or not. The question is do we think this is a possibility to be announced or is it still shelved?
As far as anyone seems to know, it's still shelved. I'm not sure why the thread keeps re-emerging other than the fact this is a rare overlay a lot of people would welcome.
 

Brer Oswald

Well-Known Member
Ok, I'll let the people of Mexico know they've got it all backwards.
That’s not at all what I’m getting at. Caballeros is a relatively obscure, 70 + year old movie that was released when animated films were still just a novelty, during the war no less. Coco is a 2 year old blockbuster with tons of promotion leading to release. It’s no wonder which is more popular.

The debate is whether or not Caballeros or Coco fits better. And my answer is that they both fit the same. They each represent different parts of the culture. My point is, why change it if you have a perfectly fine ride in a park that has rides that aren’t perfectly fine? The purists May only be marginally more impressed with the finished product, and after the honeymoon period is over, the casuals won’t be running to it anymore than they would a Donald Duck Ride. Seems like Disney has the same mindset.
 

Sir_Cliff

Well-Known Member
That’s not at all what I’m getting at. Caballeros is a relatively obscure, 70 + year old movie that was released when animated films were still just a novelty, during the war no less. Coco is a 2 year old blockbuster with tons of promotion leading to release. It’s no wonder which is more popular.

The debate is whether or not Caballeros or Coco fits better. And my answer is that they both fit the same. They each represent different parts of the culture. My point is, why change it if you have a perfectly fine ride in a park that has rides that aren’t perfectly fine? The purists May only be marginally more impressed with the finished product, and after the honeymoon period is over, the casuals won’t be running to it anymore than they would a Donald Duck Ride. Seems like Disney has the same mindset.
I guess we may just have to disagree about which film better represents Mexican culture. One thing to ponder, though, is why Disney did not foreground the Three Caballeros' main representation of Mexican culture: a gun-slinging rooster in a sombrero who speaks with a heavy accent.
 
Top Bottom