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New Roundup Rodeo BBQ sit-down restaurant coming to TSL

MansionButler84

Well-Known Member
Its interesting because I heard differently from friends of mine that were kinda underwhelmed by it. But as they say different strokes for different folks. I will experience it first hand in June and from what I hear it is worth going to in both the day and at night. I did experience the Shanghai Version last year, I hope it is much more immersive than that one, which given the park has a lot more to compete with it vs DHS was pretty quiet and clearly not the most popular area of the park.
The general guest opinion is that the rides are wonderful but waiting is unpleasant due to lack of shade and a/c while food options in the general vicinity are quite lacking (TSL and beyond—it’s a bit of a hike to dining locations with adequate capacity). They are working to address those concerns.
 

Missing20K

Well-Known Member
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I mean it certainly fits thematically. If you don’t like the theme, you don’t like the land as a whole. Guests seem to think TSL is a hit. This will absolutely improve guest reviews as it’s air-conditioned. I know we will eat here.
I'm not sure why being in Andy's backyard instantly means even more cardboard cutouts. There are certainly other ways to thematically tie the restaurant into the land without resorting to faux cardboard. The Woody's Roundup toy set you posted even has more going on in terms of story than the concept art shown.

I know there are christmas lights in the rest of the land, and it's a "child playing in the backyard" story, but I still can't for the life of me figure out how they fit in. I remember walking through the DSP version and thinking "this is pretty fun, but why the christmas lights?" Did I miss something in the movies? Do parents let their children play with christmas lights all year round these days?
 

MansionButler84

Well-Known Member
I'm not sure why being in Andy's backyard instantly means even more cardboard cutouts. There are certainly other ways to thematically tie the restaurant into the land without resorting to faux cardboard. The Woody's Roundup toy set you posted even has more going on in terms of story than the concept art shown.

I know there are christmas lights in the rest of the land, and it's a "child playing in the backyard" story, but I still can't for the life of me figure out how they fit in. I remember walking through the DSP version and thinking "this is pretty fun, but why the christmas lights?" Did I miss something in the movies? Do parents let their children play with christmas lights all year round these days?
Yes, some parents do. We are to believe a creative boy like Andy, in the 90s, might have raided the basement for his creations. With 2010s helicopter parenting, it would never happen now.
 

Missing20K

Well-Known Member
Yes, some parents do. We are to believe a creative boy like Andy, in the 90s, might have raided the basement for his creations. With 2010s helicopter parenting, it would never happen now.
But I pack my christmas lights away so nicely. My girls better not tear through those well organized boxes and bins. It took time to wrap them all back up the correct way with no tangles. ;)
 

networkpro

Well-Known Member
I do hope that its going to be decent BBQ. We were certainly aghast when Andy's Lunchbox brisket showed up with cheese on it ( I know that Le Groupe Bel is a sponsor, but that just ain't right ).
 

yensidtlaw1969

Well-Known Member
I'm not sure why being in Andy's backyard instantly means even more cardboard cutouts. There are certainly other ways to thematically tie the restaurant into the land without resorting to faux cardboard. The Woody's Roundup toy set you posted even has more going on in terms of story than the concept art shown.

I know there are christmas lights in the rest of the land, and it's a "child playing in the backyard" story, but I still can't for the life of me figure out how they fit in. I remember walking through the DSP version and thinking "this is pretty fun, but why the christmas lights?" Did I miss something in the movies? Do parents let their children play with christmas lights all year round these days?
I had a moment the other day rewatching Toy Story when this scene came up where I thought to myself "Hey, is this where all those Christmas Lights come from in Toy Story Land?":

368562

I'm sure the truth of it is that they just seemed like a fun thing to "blow up" and a creative way to light the land at night, but it was fun to notice that they do have a nice little moment in the movie where they show the toys putting them to use.
 

Missing20K

Well-Known Member
I had a moment the other day rewatching Toy Story when this scene came up where I thought to myself "Hey, is this where all those Christmas Lights come from in Toy Story Land?":

View attachment 368562

I'm sure the truth of it is that they just seemed like a fun thing to "blow up" and a creative way to light the land at night, but it was fun to notice that they do have a nice little moment in the movie where they show the toys putting them to use.
Thanks for the deep cut!! I figured I missed something.

EDIT: Though the TSL lights appear to be the larger bulb variety.
 

FerretAfros

Well-Known Member
Every TSR is a box (i.e. a building) and the aesthetic is the same as literally the entire land. But of course you’re allowed to be underwhelmed.
Some TSRs are box-shaped and decorated to look like something else (Via Napoli, Sci-Fi Dine-In, Yak & Yeti, Be Our Guest), but many are shaped to match the form of their interior, with variations in the building size and shape according to use (Akershus, Hollywood Brown Derby, Tiffins, Liberty Tree Tavern). In the architecture world, this dichotomy is often described as a decorated shed (box with a façade tacked on) vs a duck building (shaped in a way that reflects the interior use; the namesake building sold duck eggs and was shaped like a duck). By and large, when people think of the types of buildings and theming that Disney is known for, it's the duck buildings not the decorated sheds.

This one is box-shaped and is literally going to be decorated to look like an old cardboard box. I'm not sure that's something that excites me enough to want to reserve a table there. Sure, it will match the aesthetic as the rest of the land, but it's an aesthetic that's been questioned for its cheapness and ineffective immersion since the land was first announced. "More of the same" isn't something that should really be celebrated in this case: it's decoration, not design.

I know there are christmas lights in the rest of the land, and it's a "child playing in the backyard" story, but I still can't for the life of me figure out how they fit in. I remember walking through the DSP version and thinking "this is pretty fun, but why the christmas lights?" Did I miss something in the movies? Do parents let their children play with christmas lights all year round these days?
We all know how much WDI likes to recycle ideas from one location to another, so I always assumed they were just copying a bug's land at DCA, which has used oversized strings of lights in its Christmas decorations ever since they first started dressing the area up in the mid-00's. The rest of the year, the land is illuminated by firefly lamps attached to the giant clovers and ground-level lights incorporated into the various planters, fixtures, and props throughout the land.

The holiday additions began a couple years before design would have begun for the HKDL and WDSP versions of the land, so it would have been fresh in the institutional memory of WDI. That said I think something more subtle, like the permanent fixtures in DCA, would have helped the area feel less cluttered.


As an aside, my favorite bit from the Parks Blog announcement:
Once inside, you’ll be surrounded by all of the rodeo festivities in-action as well as western town and train station play sets. And you just might spot some of your favorite Disney•Pixar characters scattered throughout the restaurant in the form of toys and game pieces including a toy version of Jessie riding on the back of a Trixie pull-toy and unique toy versions of Bo Peep and her sheep, all who appear to be performing in the rodeo together.
Isn't "a toy version of Jessie" just... Jessie?
 

Casper Gutman

Well-Known Member
I know several people who have gone to Disney post-TSL opening. Without exception, every single one raved about TSL. They loved it. I went in Feb, my family loved it. Slinky is my son's current favorite ride.



DHS has 15 attractions.

6 Rides:
AS2
SDD
ToT
RnRC
ST
TSM

8 shows:
BatB
FSL
Indy
Cars
Dis Jr
One Man's Dream
Muppets 3D
Little Mermaid

Plus Launch Bay

Not counting meet and greets and entertainment.

Does need more rides for the younger set though, or a playground.



It's something modern Disney is doing. Therefore, someone will complain about it.
I counted the great Muppets, with its AAs and custom-built theatre, as an attraction but not the shows, which are for the most part embarrassingly ancient or stopgaps allowed to long outlive their sellby date. I don’t really think the presence of the creaky Mermaid or the movie previews in One Mans Dream contradict the idea that, for a major theme park, MGM has very little to do and because of this otherwise mediocre attractions attract absurd lines.

And perhaps if modern Disney stopped making so many bad decisions people would complain less. It’s all a matter of perspective.
 

MisterPenguin

Rumormonger
Premium Member
Yes, some parents do. We are to believe a creative boy like Andy, in the 90s, might have raided the basement for his creations. With 2010s helicopter parenting, it would never happen now.
Helicopter parents? We've moved on to snow plow parents who bribe colleges.

I expect Andy's backyard to be an exact miniature replica of World Showcase (which would be actual size for 'us toys') that was built for him by his Czech au pair who has a doctorate in engineering.
 
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Thebolt

Active Member
The strings of lights are one of the best indicators that we are supposed to feel toy sized in the Toy Story lands to my mind. A lot of the other stuff feels like they are giant objects, but the lights are really effective.
I can't think of a better lighting solution that is practical and on theme.
 

yensidtlaw1969

Well-Known Member
Really we are now parsing what size Christmas Lights are used in an animated movie and an imaginary land at an amusement park?! Your overthinking it!
It wasn't a complaint, just an ID - I certainly have no problem with one or the other being used in the land vs the movie.
 

Missing20K

Well-Known Member
It wasn't a complaint, just an ID - I certainly have no problem with one or the other being used in the land vs the movie.
For my dolla bills, it would have been a better homage to the film and the attempt to recreate the backyard as a themed environment, had they used lights of the same type. But, yeah, it was mostly just an observation.
 
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