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Mirror Walt Disney World 3.0 – The Definitive Version

Suchomimus

Well-Known Member
Here is a map signifying where everything is in Disney Square:

Disney Square II.png

However, do note that in MWDW 3.0, the PeopleMover does not stop here at the Transportation Station.
This wouldn’t happen to be a placeholder would it?
The Red Line (Magic Kingdom Line) connects the Magic Kingdom, Disney’s Wilderness Lodge and Disney’s Fort Wilderness Resort and Campground / River Country.
So, does the Red Line not go through the Contemporary Resort property?
 

DisneyManOne

Well-Known Member
Original Poster
This wouldn’t happen to be a placeholder would it?

So, does the Red Line not go through the Contemporary Resort property?
First, that was the map I used for MWDW-A last summer, back when I thought a two-lane PeopleMover -- with one lane serving the eastern half of the resort and one lane serving the west -- was needed. Apart from that, the layout remains very much the same.

And second, nope. The only mode of transport that goes through the Contemporary is the Monorail.
 

DisneyManOne

Well-Known Member
Original Poster
Well, I've been real excited to share this with you all. And now that the weekend is over, I finally can! Let us finally start to explore Walt Disney World's first theme park!

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Magic Kingdom



Having been aboard the Monorail for quite some time now, we find ourselves soaring past the Seven Seas Lagoon and through the Contemporary, one of the most thrilling experiences in all of Walt Disney World. A sudden burst of excitement fills the air as a young child bursts from her seat and rushes to the window, pointing excitedly at something outside. Looking out the window, we find that she has been the first to spot the Magic Kingdom itself, its wondrous mountain ranges and countless gleaming structures dotting the horizon. The whole cabin can’t help from smiling at her beaming face.

The crown jewel of the Walt Disney World Resort, the Magic Kingdom is where the magic of dreams coming true begins. Inspired by, and building upon, the legacy of its Californian counterpart, the Magic Kingdom is a remarkable design in immersion and focus on the Guest Experience. If there’s one thing that the Magic Kingdom prides itself over, it’s the fact that everything is a form of storytelling. We, the audience, will physically experience one adventure after another, seldom as spectators, but almost always as “participants” in the drama. As I described earlier, the Magic Kingdom, like its fellow parks, is a seamless, thematic epic. The harmonic blend of yesterday, tomorrow and fantasy act in compliment of the wild animals, alien creatures, and storybook castles waiting beyond the front gate.

The park gets closer and closer until we finally come to a complete stop at the Magic Kingdom monorail station, located to the western side of the park’s entrance (with the PeopleMover station on the eastern side). Walking down an entry ramp, we approach the main entrance, having already purchased our tickets. Filling our ears as we approach the entrance plaza are the instrumental strains of many classic Disney songs. The most current entrance music loop debuted in 2005, in time for the Happiest Homecoming on Earth, and is, for the most part, the same music loop that entertained visitors to Tokyo Disneyland from 2001 to 2020. However, there are two notable changes: First, since Honey, I Shrunk the Audience opened at EPCOT instead of here at the Magic Kingdom, the show’s exit music was replaced by an arrangement of “There’s a Great Big Beautiful Tomorrow”, the venerable theme from the Carousel of Progress. And second, in 2020, as part of Disney’s initiative to further distance themselves from the highly-controversial Song of the South, “Zip-a-Dee-Doo-Dah” and “Ev’rybody Has a Laughing Place” were removed and replaced with new tracks, and a few other tracks were replaced here and there, as well. The current entrance loop is, as follows…



  1. “Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious” – Richard M. Sherman and Robert B. Sherman, Mary Poppins
  2. “Winnie the Pooh” – Richard M. Sherman and Robert B. Sherman, The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh
  3. “You’ve Got a Friend in Me” – Randy Newman, Toy Story
  4. “Beautiful Beulah” – Richard M. Sherman and Robert B. Sherman, Summer Magic
  5. “All in the Golden Afternoon” – Sammy Fain and Bob Hilliard, Alice in Wonderland
  6. “Hooray for Hollywood” (2:27 on) – Richard A. Whiting and Johnny Mercer, The Great Movie Ride
  7. “Painting the Roses Red” – Sammy Fain and Bob Hilliard, Alice in Wonderland
  8. “Who’s Afraid of the Big Bad Wolf?” – Frank Churchill and Anne Ronell & Ted Sears, Three Little Pigs
  9. “There’s a Great Big Beautiful Tomorrow” (fades out at 2:50, before narration starts) – Richard M. Sherman and Robert B. Sherman, Carousel of Progress
  10. “Woody’s Roundup” – Randy Newman, Toy Story 2
  11. “You Can Fly! You Can Fly! You Can Fly!” – Sammy Fain and Sammy Cahn, Peter Pan
  12. “Come Again” – George Bruns and Tom Adair, Country Bear Jamboree
  13. “Minnie’s Yoo-Hoo” – Carl Stalling and Walt Disney, Mickey’s Follies
  14. “Mickey Mouse March” – Jimmie Dodd, The Mickey Mouse Club
  15. “The Tiki, Tiki, Tiki Room” – Richard M. Sherman and Robert B. Sherman, The Enchanted Tiki Room
  16. “Hi-Diddle-Dee-Dee” – Leigh Harline and Ned Washington, Pinocchio
  17. “When You Wish Upon a Star” – Leigh Harline and Ned Washington, Pinocchio
  18. “Hip-Hip-Pooh-Ray!” – Richard M. Sherman and Robert B. Sherman, The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh
  19. “Be Our Guest” – Alan Menken and Howard Ashman, Beauty and the Beast
  20. “Let’s Go Fly a Kite” – Richard M. Sherman and Robert B. Sherman, Mary Poppins
  21. “I Wanna Be Like You” – Richard M. Sherman and Robert B. Sherman, The Jungle Book
  22. “Grim Grinning Ghosts” – Buddy Baker and Xavier Atencio, arranged by John Debney, The Haunted Mansion
  23. “Belle” – Alan Menken and Howard Ashman, Beauty and the Beast
  24. “Little Black Rain Cloud” – Richard M. Sherman and Robert B. Sherman, The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh
  25. “Yoda’s Theme” – John Williams, The Empire Strikes Back
  26. “It’s a Small World” – Richard M. Sherman and Robert B. Sherman, arranged by John Debney, “it’s a small world”
  27. “Yo Ho (A Pirate’s Life for Me)” – George Bruns and Xavier Atencio, Pirates of the Caribbean
  28. “Heigh-Ho” – Frank Churchill and Larry Morey, Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs
  29. “Hakuna Matata” – Elton John and Tim Rice, The Lion King
  30. Fantasyland Castle Medley (fades out at 5:32, before it reaches the point where the medley repeats)
  • “When You Wish Upon a Star” – Leigh Harline and Ned Washington, Pinocchio
  • “Once Upon a Dream” – Pytor Ilyich Tchaikovsky and George Bruns & Sammy Fain and Jack Lawrence, Sleeping Beauty
  • “A Dream is a Wish Your Heart Makes” – Mack David and Jerry Livingston & Al Hoffman, Cinderella
  • “Someday My Prince Will Come” – Frank Churchill and Larry Morey, Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs


The park’s turnstiles are the first of what will be many fanciful details located throughout the resort – graceful and elegant, made of wrought-iron. We hand our ticket to a smiling Cast Member and pass through the turnstiles, a little bell sounding off as we enter. What we find is a truly stunning sight…

Main Street, U.S.A.

MK_Entrance_NoCrowd.jpg

What was America like at the turn-of-the-century? Perhaps it was something like this recreation of everyone’s hometown. The nostalgia of Main Street, U.S.A. hits us right out of the gate… literally. Once through the ornate turnstiles, we glimpse the sight of a turn-of-the-century train station, fronted by a beautiful flower bed, complete with a floral depiction of Mickey Mouse’s smiling face right in the middle. A window in the center of the station is dedicated to the man who started it all, Walt Disney. It was installed in 2001 to mark Walt’s 100th birthday. Below, a sign reads: “THE MAGIC KINGDOM – WALT DISNEY WORLD – POPULATION: 600,000,000 – ELEVATION: 108 FT.”

Suddenly, we hear the familiar call of a steam whistle. A beautiful steam engine chuffs its way along the track, halting with a hiss. The beauty and grandeur of steam travel is captured in the romance and excitement of the Walt Disney World Railroad, a grand-circle tour of the Magic Kingdom.




From aboard the Walt Disney World Railroad, we view the many sights and sounds along the rails, giving us a sneak peek at what the Magic Kingdom has in store: an ancient jungle, a bustling circus, a burning settler’s cabin and the distant excitement of Tinseltown. All the things we see are pointed out to us by a heard-but-not-seen old-timer, who fully embodies the traveling vagabond “everywhere-I-hang-my-hat-is-home” spirit.

“Your attention, please. The Walt Disney World Railroad is now boarding for a grand circle tour of the Magic Kingdom, with stops at Main Street, U.S.A., Frontierland and Fantasyland. All aboard!”

Trains are scheduled to arrive every 5 to 10 minutes at most times throughout the day, and travel clockwise around the park. The four meticulously restored, working narrow-gauge engines are named for the people who helped make this place possible: the Walter E. Disney, the Lilly Belle, the Roger E. Broggie and the Roy O. Disney.

In addition to all the wonderful sights visible from the Walt Disney World Railroad, there are two special places that one can only visit by riding this train. Between Frontierland and Fantasyland, the rockwork of Columbia Gorge on the edge of the Rivers of America gives way to Constellation Point.


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Mainly consisting of fiber-optic effects and ethereal arrangements of Disney music, Constellation Point – which takes place inside two massive tunnels – takes us past, well, constellations of classic Disney characters; specifically, those we shall meet in Fantasyland. In addition, Constellation Point gives us sneak peeks at the rides whose buildings border the tunnel. As we enter the first tunnel, we find ourselves in an underwater fantasy. The sunlight shines down on the water, creating a mesmerizing effect. We can see Atlantica in the distance to the left of the train, and a screen to the right features the silhouette of Ariel swimming past. We can even hear Ariel’s voice, seemingly calling out to us.

A brief respite back out into the fresh air gives us views of the Golden Age of Hollywood on the left side of the train and views of a provincial French village – as well as a majestic castle – to the right side. The rockwork surrounding the castle leads into another constellation tunnel, where we can see a sleeping Winnie the Pooh floating off into his dreamland.


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Between the Fantasyland and Main Street stations, a daring view awaits: the City of Tomorrowland. This epic diorama runs quite the gamut. Once we pass by Space Mountain, we enter the diorama, not leaving until we’ve crossed the bridge over the Cast Member parking entrance. In this diorama, we find ourselves in a city not unlike the one seen in the sci-fi masterpiece Metropolis. Deco-Tech and futuristic technology, represented in static models and in special projections, fill our field of vision on both sides of the train. It should look like we are passing right through an early 20th century science-fiction movie! And at the end of the tunnel, we are brought from the future back to the past. We have arrived back at Main Street Station.

Excitement mounting, we pass underneath the train station through one of two tunnels located on either side of the flower bed. A plaque above each tunnel bears the inspired phrase:


“HERE YOU
LEAVE TODAY
AND ENTER
THE WORLD OF
YESTERDAY,
TOMORROW
AND FANTASY.”


Magic-Kingdom_Full_44623.jpg

An iconic attribute to any Magic Kingdom, posters line the tunnel walls, offering a taste of the coming attractions and adventures – not unlike the posters found in the lobby of a movie theater. Each tunnel has different posters, so it’s not uncommon to see hardcore Disney fans start the day by entering through one tunnel, and end it by exiting through another, just so they can see them all.

Beyond these tunnels is Main Street, U.S.A. itself…


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The sights and sounds of fun nostalgia are everywhere...and I do mean everywhere. There’s a friendly greeting at the old City Hall. The measured pace of the horse-drawn streetcar as it trots up and down the street. And then there’s the hiss of live steam as a vintage locomotive pulls into Main Street Station. Dozens of happy guests walk up and down the street, chatting happily, or not-so-happily, amongst themselves as they pop in and out of the various shops and restaurants nestled along the sides of the pavement. Main Street is the essence of hometown America at the dawn of the twentieth century. The scent of freshly baked cakes and candies and the twinkling pin lights outlining the gingerbread trim of the colorful buildings evoke a small-town atmosphere. Rows of specialty shops carry a colorful variety of old-time merchandise. At night, the thoroughfare glows in the flickering light of gas-lit streetlamps and seemingly thousands of miniature electric lightbulbs strung amongst the sides of the buildings. Main Street, U.S.A. is engaging proof that the best of yesterday can still be found today.

Time seems to soften amid the orchestral rhythm of ragtime and the clopping of horse hooves. As the stress of contemporary life gives way to the quaint charms of yesteryear, we find ourselves in a little town at the turn-of-the-century. Main Street, U.S.A. is a sparkling thoroughfare presented in the style and architecture of a street not unlike what you’d find in the history books of the early 1900s, taking inspiration from not only Walt’s boyhood home of Marceline, Missouri, but also taking influences from around the country, such as New England and the Midwest. All around us is the color and excitement of a town at the start of a bold new century, at a time when electricity, transport and communication are about to change everything we know about the way we live our lives.

Our time on Main Street, U.S.A. begins in Town Square, the civic hub of transportation and gathering. In the center of Town Square is Elias Park. Well-kept lawns and vibrant planters surround a tall flagpole, from which the Stars and Stripes proudly wave. A Magic Kingdom tradition since 1971 is the moving, yet understated, Flag Retreat Ceremony held every evening, just before sundown, at the base of the flagpole. Sat beneath the cool shade of tall trees, aptly placed benches provide ample seating for the ongoing entertainment throughout the day.


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Of course, no Town Square would be complete without an appearance or two from the world famous Disney Characters. Throughout the day, starting promptly at 9:00 a.m., Mickey and the gang – that’s Minnie, Donald, Daisy, Oswald, Goofy, Pluto, Chip and Dale – are there, eager to welcome guests to a day of fun and excitement here at the Magic Kingdom! Although their main meet ‘n’ greet location is right here in Town Square, they also make occasional appearances in the other areas of the park – with the notable and deliberate exception of Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge – in appropriate costumes (safari gear for Adventureland, Western cowboy gear for Frontierland, colonial attire for Liberty Square, either sorcerer outfits or royal attire for Fantasyland, Tinseltown finery for Hollywoodland, and astronaut suits for Tomorrowland).

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In Town Square, the Main Street Vehicles are the major ways to get around. We can board an old-fashioned Fire Engine, Paddy Wagon, Horseless Carriage, Limousine, Jitney, Omnibus, or Horse-Drawn Trolley, for a one-way trip to the center of the Magic Kingdom via Main Street, U.S.A. To choose a mode of transportation, each vehicle has a designated stopping zone marked by a decorative sign.

The Chamber of Commerce offers Disney’s “Package Pickup” service. City Hall is the home of Guest Relations. Friendly cast members are always on hand to answer questions, provide touring tips, make reservations and assist visitors with special needs. The adjacent Fire Station provides a glimpse at a period facility of the sort, housing a real fire engine. A Locker Facility can also be found in Town Square, on the first floor of the train station.

Like the various Main Streets of the real world, Main Street, U.S.A. is populated with “real,” believable people – a concept Disney calls “Streetmosphere.” The so-called Citizens of Main Street walk the street in stride, a living snapshot of the optimism, humor and pride of the American Dream. Among the many Citizens, the ever-friendly Mayor is always ready with a smile and a joke; the local Fire Chief and Police Chief are always looking out for danger (although in the Magic Kingdom, the only dangerous thing is someone not having fun); and a Suffragette frequently marches the streets, rallying people to support the cause.

A band concert in the park was a common civic diversion of small town American life at the turn-of-the-century. The Walt Disney World Marching Band hearkens back to that time with their daily concerts in Town Square. The iconic program includes energetic musicians, synchronized marches, popular songs of the early twentieth century, and songs of the Disney canon. The world-famous Dapper Dans often perform up and down Main Street to welcome us as we enter the park. Their four-part harmonic repertoire includes barbershop ballads as well as many memorable tunes from the world of Disney. At certain times throughout the morning, the Main Street Trolley Show makes its way “right down the middle of Main Street, U.S.A.”, as a chorus of energetic youths set the mood for the fun and excitement ahead of us.

On a morning like today, when Main Street is open early to guests, we are invited to leisurely wander through the area as we anxiously await for the rest of the Magic Kingdom to open, and experience its shops, exhibits and attractions, including round trips on the Walt Disney World Railroad and the first showing of Walt Disney: One Man’s Dream.


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Walt Disney might have done more to touch the hearts and minds of millions of Americans than any other man in history. He brought joy, happiness, and a universal means of communication to people of all nations. Certainly, our world shall know but one Walt Disney. In 1973, two years after the Magic Kingdom first opened its gates, The Walt Disney Story, a film created by Jack Boyd and Bill Bosche, opened within the walls of the Town Square Exposition Hall. This was a film in which Walt’s life story was illustrated via a living photo album, complete with Walt himself narrating! The experience made use of two theaters to better control the crowd flow, as well as unique pre-show and post-show exhibits (The link leads to a blueprint detailing what the floorplan of The Walt Disney Story was like). But in 2001, for the “100 Years of Magic” celebration, it was announced that the nearly 30-year-old film would be replaced with a newer film, and the attraction itself would receive a whole upgrade!

walt-disney-presents-displays-09152017-42-1024x682.jpg

Just beyond the entrance, a number of scale models, statuettes and artwork harken to the man behind the mouse. The teal and white color scheme of The Walt Disney Story has been replaced by red carpeting and golden walls. Even the plaques detailing the exhibits have changed to fit the theme, with wooden panelings and old-timey fonts. And speaking of exhibits, there’s a vast wealth of unique things on display: models, artwork, costumes, authentic movie and theme park props, awards, even a few working animatronics – for example, there’s a bird from the Tiki Room you can try your hand at controlling, and there’s even the famous “Dancing Man” display that inspired Walt to make Audio-Animatronics in the first place! In fact, with the changeover, Theater 1 was completely gutted to make way for an expanded exhibit space, thus leaving Theater 2 as the only theater used.

At the rear of the museum is the entrance to the theater; warmly-lit, with curtains hanging over the automatic doors. An elaborate mural is prominently featured on the wall nearby the theater. Originally, the mural was painted by Bill Justice, but that was removed for the 100 Years of Magic Celebration and replaced with this piece, but that was soon removed in 2022 and replaced in 2023 with an all-new mural painted by Manuel Hernandez. Inspired by two of his works – Celebration and The Big Five-Oh! – this new mural celebrates 100 years of The Walt Disney Company by having characters from all 62 Disney Animated Canon films released throughout Disney’s first 100 years in the business, from Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs to Wish, as well as a few familiar Pixar faces and live-action faces, gathering in Central Plaza for a grand nighttime celebration. Expect to see friends like Dumbo and Mary Poppins soaring near a glimmering Cinderella Castle, the Disney princes and princesses waltzing to the strains of music courtesy of the Seven Dwarfs and Miguel Rivera, Baloo and Mowgli enjoying a nighttime cruise along the rivers, Winnie the Pooh and his Hundred Acre Wood friends picnicking, and of course, Mickey and the gang in the center of the Hub, taking in all the wonder.

It is here in this theater, of course, that we watch a film about the life of the man who started it all, narrated by Julie Andrews…and Walt himself!

Upon exiting the theater, guests find themselves in the attraction’s post-show area, “The Legacy Continues.” This is an exhibit space offering guests a glimpse at Disney’s achievements post-Walt, via facts and trivia, movie props and costumes, even a wildebeest mask used in The Lion King on Broadway. There are also scale models of the four icons of Walt Disney World’s theme parks – Cinderella Castle, Spaceship Earth, the Tree of Life and Pharos Lighthouse; not to mention scale models of Disneyland Paris’ Sleeping Beauty Castle and the Tower of Terror.


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But that’s not all! When the film switched from The Walt Disney Story to One Man’s Dream, they also turned the Disneyana Collectibles shop held within the building into The Disney Gallery. In a private collection of portraits, paintings, caricatures and sculptures, The Disney Gallery serves as a showcase for the artwork of Walt Disney Imagineering and Animation, past and present. Special displays show rare storyboards from the Walt-era films, and Q&A sessions with Imagineers and artists happen on the occasion. A live artist is often found on hand here, providing free sketches for patrons (but only one per family, though). Plus, if your wallet’s fat enough, you can purchase some of the items on display! Among the items on sale are paintings, limited-edition prints, cels, figurines and the much-coveted Walt Disney Classics Collection.

tonys-town-square-magic-kingdom-restaurant-food-disney-world-175.jpg




Located to the left of the Exposition Hall is Tony’s Town Square Restaurant. To many Disney fans, this name may sound familiar. This is because this restaurant is inspired by the same Tony’s restaurant that served as the setting of one of the most iconic scenes in Disney history: the moment when Lady and Tramp fell in love on that “lovely bella notte.” Inside this beautiful restaurant, you'll find all sorts of Italian treats: pizza, paninis, antipasto, sausage, seasonal soup, salads, scampi, chicken parmesan, fettuccine, and, of course, spaghetti and meatballs. Plus, there’s plenty of vino and birra to spare; and quite a few authentic Italian desserts.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Our tour of the Magic Kingdom has officially begun! What did you all think of Town Square? And did you notice any of the hints at what lies in store here? Feel free to leave any feedback you have! Oh, but don't think we're fully done with Main Street. We still need to head down the street itself, which we shall do on Wednesday!

By the way, the introduction to this post -- with the girl eagerly spotting the Magic Kingdom -- came from an early version of @MANEATINGWREATH's Dream Resort thread. I thought it would be nice to include as a tribute to his work, given that Mirror Disneyland 3.0 is his final work here on the forums, and that his work would go on to inspire my own dream resort threads.
 
Last edited:

DisneyFan32

Well-Known Member
In the Parks
Yes
Well, I've been real excited to share this with you all. And now that the weekend is over, I finally can! Let us finally start to explore Walt Disney World's first theme park!

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Magic Kingdom



Having been aboard the Monorail for quite some time now, we find ourselves soaring past the Seven Seas Lagoon and through the Contemporary, one of the most thrilling experiences in all of Walt Disney World. A sudden burst of excitement fills the air as a young child bursts from her seat and rushes to the window, pointing excitedly at something outside. Looking out the window, we find that she has been the first to spot the Magic Kingdom itself, its wondrous mountain ranges and countless gleaming structures dotting the horizon. The whole cabin can’t help from smiling at her beaming face.

The crown jewel of the Walt Disney World Resort, the Magic Kingdom is where the magic of dreams coming true begins. Inspired by, and building upon, the legacy of its Californian counterpart, the Magic Kingdom is a remarkable design in immersion and focus on the Guest Experience. If there’s one thing that the Magic Kingdom prides itself over, it’s the fact that everything is a form of storytelling. We, the audience, will physically experience one adventure after another, seldom as spectators, but almost always as “participants” in the drama. As I described earlier, the Magic Kingdom, like its fellow parks, is a seamless, thematic epic. The harmonic blend of yesterday, tomorrow and fantasy act in compliment of the wild animals, alien creatures, and storybook castles waiting beyond the front gate.

The park gets closer and closer until we finally come to a complete stop at the Magic Kingdom monorail station, located to the western side of the park’s entrance (with the PeopleMover station on the eastern side). Walking down an entry ramp, we approach the main entrance, having already purchased our tickets. Filling our ears as we approach the entrance plaza are the instrumental strains of many classic Disney songs. The most current entrance music loop debuted in 2005, in time for the Happiest Homecoming on Earth, and is, for the most part, the same music loop that entertained visitors to Tokyo Disneyland from 2001 to 2020. However, there are two notable changes: First, since Honey, I Shrunk the Audience opened at EPCOT instead of here at the Magic Kingdom, the show’s exit music was replaced by an arrangement of “There’s a Great Big Beautiful Tomorrow”, the venerable theme from the Carousel of Progress. And second, in 2020, as part of Disney’s initiative to further distance themselves from the highly-controversial Song of the South, “Zip-a-Dee-Doo-Dah” and “Ev’rybody Has a Laughing Place” were removed and replaced with new tracks, and a few other tracks were replaced here and there, as well. The current entrance loop is, as follows…

  1. “Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious” – Richard M. Sherman and Robert B. Sherman, Mary Poppins
  2. “Winnie the Pooh” – Richard M. Sherman and Robert B. Sherman, The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh
  3. “You’ve Got a Friend in Me” – Randy Newman, Toy Story
  4. “Beautiful Beulah” – Richard M. Sherman and Robert B. Sherman, Summer Magic
  5. “All in the Golden Afternoon” – Sammy Fain and Bob Hilliard, Alice in Wonderland
  6. “Hooray for Hollywood” (2:27 on) – Richard A. Whiting and Johnny Mercer, The Great Movie Ride
  7. “Painting the Roses Red” – Sammy Fain and Bob Hilliard, Alice in Wonderland
  8. “Who’s Afraid of the Big Bad Wolf?” – Frank Churchill and Anne Ronell & Ted Sears, Three Little Pigs
  9. “There’s a Great Big Beautiful Tomorrow” (fades out at 2:50, before narration starts) – Richard M. Sherman and Robert B. Sherman, Carousel of Progress
  10. “Woody’s Roundup” – Randy Newman, Toy Story 2
  11. “You Can Fly! You Can Fly! You Can Fly!” – Sammy Fain and Sammy Cahn, Peter Pan
  12. “Come Again” – George Bruns and Tom Adair, Country Bear Jamboree
  13. “Minnie’s Yoo-Hoo” – Carl Stalling and Walt Disney, Mickey’s Follies
  14. “Mickey Mouse March” – Jimmie Dodd, The Mickey Mouse Club
  15. “The Tiki, Tiki, Tiki Room” – Richard M. Sherman and Robert B. Sherman, The Enchanted Tiki Room
  16. “Hi-Diddle-Dee-Dee” – Leigh Harline and Ned Washington, Pinocchio
  17. “When You Wish Upon a Star” – Leigh Harline and Ned Washington, Pinocchio
  18. “Hip-Hip-Pooh-Ray!” – Richard M. Sherman and Robert B. Sherman, The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh
  19. “Be Our Guest” – Alan Menken and Howard Ashman, Beauty and the Beast
  20. “Let’s Go Fly a Kite” – Richard M. Sherman and Robert B. Sherman, Mary Poppins
  21. “I Wanna Be Like You” – Richard M. Sherman and Robert B. Sherman, The Jungle Book
  22. “Grim Grinning Ghosts” – Buddy Baker and Xavier Atencio, arranged by John Debney, The Haunted Mansion
  23. “Belle” – Alan Menken and Howard Ashman, Beauty and the Beast
  24. “Little Black Rain Cloud” – Richard M. Sherman and Robert B. Sherman, The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh
  25. “Yoda’s Theme” – John Williams, The Empire Strikes Back
  26. “It’s a Small World” – Richard M. Sherman and Robert B. Sherman, arranged by John Debney, “it’s a small world”
  27. “Yo Ho (A Pirate’s Life for Me)” – George Bruns and Xavier Atencio, Pirates of the Caribbean
  28. “Heigh-Ho” – Frank Churchill and Larry Morey, Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs
  29. “Hakuna Matata” – Elton John and Tim Rice, The Lion King
  30. Fantasyland Castle Medley (fades out at 5:32, before it reaches the point where the medley repeats)
  • “When You Wish Upon a Star” – Leigh Harline and Ned Washington, Pinocchio
  • “Once Upon a Dream” – Pytor Ilyich Tchaikovsky and George Bruns & Sammy Fain and Jack Lawrence, Sleeping Beauty
  • “A Dream is a Wish Your Heart Makes” – Mack David and Jerry Livingston & Al Hoffman, Cinderella
  • “Someday My Prince Will Come” – Frank Churchill and Larry Morey, Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs

The park’s turnstiles is the first of what will be many fanciful details located throughout the resort – graceful and elegant, made of wrought-iron. We hand our ticket to a smiling Cast Member and pass through the turnstiles, a little bell sounding off as we enter. What we find is a truly stunning sight…

Main Street, U.S.A.

MK_Entrance_NoCrowd.jpg

What was America like at the turn-of-the-century? Perhaps it was something like this recreation of everyone’s hometown. The nostalgia of Main Street, U.S.A. hits us right out of the gate… literally. Once through the ornate turnstiles, we glimpse the sight of a turn-of-the-century train station, fronted by a beautiful flower bed, complete with a floral depiction of Mickey Mouse’s smiling face right in the middle. A window in the center of the station is dedicated to the man who started it all, Walt Disney. It was installed in 2001 to mark Walt’s 100th birthday. Below, a sign reads: “THE MAGIC KINGDOM – WALT DISNEY WORLD – POPULATION: 600,000,000 – ELEVATION: 108 FT.”

Suddenly, we hear the familiar call of a steam whistle. A beautiful steam engine chuffs its way along the track, halting with a hiss. The beauty and grandeur of steam travel is captured in the romance and excitement of the Walt Disney World Railroad, a grand-circle tour of the Magic Kingdom.




From aboard the Walt Disney World Railroad, we view the many sights and sounds along the rails, giving us a sneak peek at what the Magic Kingdom has in store: an ancient jungle, a bustling circus, a burning settler’s cabin and the distant excitement of Tinseltown. All the things we see are pointed out to us by a heard-but-not-seen old-timer, who fully embodies the traveling vagabond “everywhere-I-hang-my-hat-is-home” spirit.

“Your attention, please. The Walt Disney World Railroad is now boarding for a grand circle tour of the Magic Kingdom, with stops at Main Street, U.S.A., Frontierland and Fantasyland. All aboard!”

Trains are scheduled to arrive every 5 to 10 minutes at most times throughout the day, and travel clockwise around the park. The four meticulously restored, working narrow-gauge engines are named for the people who helped make this place possible: the Walter E. Disney, the Lilly Belle, the Roger E. Broggie and the Roy O. Disney.

In addition to all the wonderful sights visible from the Walt Disney World Railroad, there are two special places that one can only visit by riding this train. Between Frontierland and Fantasyland, the rockwork of Columbia Gorge on the edge of the Rivers of America gives way to Constellation Point.


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Mainly consisting of fiber-optic effects and ethereal arrangements of Disney music, Constellation Point – which takes place inside two massive tunnels – takes us past, well, constellations of classic Disney characters; specifically, those we shall meet in Fantasyland. In addition, Constellation Point gives us sneak peeks at the rides whose buildings border the tunnel. As we enter the first tunnel, we find ourselves in an underwater fantasy. The sunlight shines down on the water, creating a mesmerizing effect. We can see Atlantica in the distance to the left of the train, and a screen to the right features the silhouette of Ariel swimming past. We can even hear Ariel’s voice, seemingly calling out to us.

A brief respite back out into the fresh air gives us views of the Golden Age of Hollywood on the left side of the train and views of a provincial French village – as well as a majestic castle – to the right side. The rockwork surrounding the castle leads into another constellation tunnel, where we can see a sleeping Winnie the Pooh floating off into his dreamland.


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Between the Fantasyland and Main Street stations, a daring view awaits: the City of Tomorrowland. This epic diorama runs quite the gamut. Once we pass by Space Mountain, we enter the diorama, not leaving until we’ve crossed the bridge over the Cast Member parking entrance. In this diorama, we find ourselves in a city not unlike the one seen in the sci-fi masterpiece Metropolis. Deco-Tech and futuristic technology, represented in static models and in special projections, fill our field of vision on both sides of the train. It should look like we are passing right through an early 20th century science-fiction movie! And at the end of the tunnel, we are brought from the future back to the past. We have arrived back at Main Street Station.

Excitement mounting, we pass underneath the train station through one of two tunnels located on either side of the flower bed. A plaque above each tunnel bears the inspired phrase:


“HERE YOU
LEAVE TODAY
AND ENTER
THE WORLD OF
YESTERDAY,
TOMORROW
AND FANTASY.”


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An iconic attribute to any Magic Kingdom, posters line the tunnel walls, offering a taste of the coming attractions and adventures – not unlike the posters found in the lobby of a movie theater. Each tunnel has different posters, so it’s not uncommon to see hardcore Disney fans start the day by entering through one tunnel, and end it by exiting through another, just so they can see them all.

Beyond these tunnels is Main Street, U.S.A. itself…


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The sights and sounds of fun nostalgia are everywhere...and I do mean everywhere. There’s a friendly greeting at the old City Hall. The measured pace of the horse-drawn streetcar as it trots up and down the street. And then there’s the hiss of live steam as a vintage locomotive pulls into Main Street Station. Dozens of happy guests walk up and down the street, chatting happily, or not-so-happily, amongst themselves as they pop in and out of the various shops and restaurants nestled along the sides of the pavement. Main Street is the essence of hometown America at the dawn of the twentieth century. The scent of freshly baked cakes and candies and the twinkling pin lights outlining the gingerbread trim of the colorful buildings evoke a small-town atmosphere. Rows of specialty shops carry a colorful variety of old-time merchandise. At night, the thoroughfare glows in the flickering light of gas-lit streetlamps and seemingly thousands of miniature electric lightbulbs strung amongst the sides of the buildings. Main Street, U.S.A. is engaging proof that the best of yesterday can still be found today.

Time seems to soften amid the orchestral rhythm of ragtime and the clopping of horse hooves. As the stress of contemporary life gives way to the quaint charms of yesteryear, we find ourselves in a little town at the turn-of-the-century. Main Street, U.S.A. is a sparkling thoroughfare presented in the style and architecture of a street not unlike what you’d find in the history books of the early 1900s, taking inspiration from not only Walt’s boyhood home of Marceline, Missouri, but also taking influences from around the country, such as New England and the Midwest. All around us is the color and excitement of a town at the start of a bold new century, at a time when electricity, transport and communication are about to change everything we know about the way we live our lives.

Our time on Main Street, U.S.A. begins in Town Square, the civic hub of transportation and gathering. In the center of Town Square is Elias Park. Well-kept lawns and vibrant planters surround a tall flagpole, from which the Stars and Stripes proudly wave. A Magic Kingdom tradition since 1971 is the moving, yet understated, Flag Retreat Ceremony held every evening, just before sundown, at the base of the flagpole. Sat beneath the cool shade of tall trees, aptly placed benches provide ample seating for the ongoing entertainment throughout the day.


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Of course, no Town Square would be complete without an appearance or two from the world famous Disney Characters. Throughout the day, starting promptly at 9:00 a.m., Mickey and the gang – that’s Minnie, Donald, Daisy, Oswald, Goofy, Pluto, Chip and Dale – are there, eager to welcome guests to a day of fun and excitement here at the Magic Kingdom! Although their main meet ‘n’ greet location is right here in Town Square, they also make occasional appearances in the other areas of the park – with the notable and deliberate exception of Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge – in appropriate costumes (safari gear for Adventureland, Western cowboy gear for Frontierland, colonial attire for Liberty Square, either sorcerer outfits or royal attire for Fantasyland, Tinseltown finery for Hollywoodland, and astronaut suits for Tomorrowland).

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In Town Square, the Main Street Vehicles are the major ways to get around. We can board an old-fashioned Fire Engine, Paddy Wagon, Horseless Carriage, Limousine, Jitney, Omnibus, or Horse-Drawn Trolley, for a one-way trip to the center of the Magic Kingdom via Main Street, U.S.A. To choose a mode of transportation, each vehicle has a designated stopping zone marked by a decorative sign.

The Chamber of Commerce offers Disney’s “Package Pickup” service. City Hall is the home of Guest Relations. Friendly cast members are always on hand to answer questions, provide touring tips, make reservations and assist visitors with special needs. The adjacent Fire Station provides a glimpse at a period facility of the sort, housing a real fire engine. A Locker Facility can also be found in Town Square, on the first floor of the train station.

Like the various Main Streets of the real world, Main Street, U.S.A. is populated with “real,” believable people – a concept Disney calls “Streetmosphere.” The so-called Citizens of Main Street walk the street in stride, a living snapshot of the optimism, humor and pride of the American Dream. Among the many Citizens, the ever-friendly Mayor is always ready with a smile and a joke; the local Fire Chief and Police Chief are always looking out for danger (although in the Magic Kingdom, the only dangerous thing is someone not having fun); and a Suffragette frequently marches the streets, rallying people to support the cause.

A band concert in the park was a common civic diversion of small town American life at the turn-of-the-century. The Walt Disney World Marching Band hearkens back to that time with their daily concerts in Town Square. The iconic program includes energetic musicians, synchronized marches, popular songs of the early twentieth century, and songs of the Disney canon. The world-famous Dapper Dans often perform up and down Main Street to welcome us as we enter the park. Their four-part harmonic repertoire includes barbershop ballads as well as many memorable tunes from the world of Disney. At certain times throughout the morning, the Main Street Trolley Show makes its way “right down the middle of Main Street, U.S.A.”, as a chorus of energetic youths set the mood for the fun and excitement ahead of us.

On a morning like today, when Main Street is open early to guests, we are invited to leisurely wander through the area as we anxiously await for the rest of the Magic Kingdom to open, and experience its shops, exhibits and attractions, including round trips on the Walt Disney World Railroad and the first showing of Walt Disney: One Man’s Dream.


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Walt Disney might have done more to touch the hearts and minds of millions of Americans than any other man in history. He brought joy, happiness, and a universal means of communication to people of all nations. Certainly, our world shall know but one Walt Disney. In 1973, two years after the Magic Kingdom first opened its gates, The Walt Disney Story, a film created by Jack Boyd and Bill Bosche, opened within the walls of the Town Square Exposition Hall. This was a film in which Walt’s life story was illustrated via a living photo album, complete with Walt himself narrating! But in 2001, for the “100 Years of Magic” celebration, it was announced that the nearly 30-year-old film would be replaced with a newer film, and the attraction itself would receive a whole upgrade!

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Just beyond the entrance, a number of scale models, statuettes and artwork harken to the man behind the mouse. The teal and white color scheme of The Walt Disney Story has been replaced by red carpeting and golden walls. Even the plaques detailing the exhibits have changed to fit the theme, with wooden panelings and old-timey fonts. And speaking of exhibits, there’s a vast wealth of unique things on display: models, artwork, costumes, authentic movie and theme park props, awards, even a few working animatronics – for example, there’s a bird from the Tiki Room you can try your hand at controlling, and there’s even the famous “Dancing Man” display that inspired Walt to make Audio-Animatronics in the first place! In fact, with the changeover, Theater 1 was completely gutted to make way for an expanded exhibit space, thus leaving Theater 2 as the only theater used.

At the rear of the museum is the entrance to the theater; warmly-lit, with curtains hanging over the automatic doors. An elaborate mural is prominently featured on the wall nearby the theater. Originally, the mural was painted by Bill Justice, but that was removed for the 100 Years of Magic Celebration and replaced with this piece, but that was soon removed in 2022 and replaced in 2023 with an all-new mural painted by Manuel Hernandez. Inspired by two of his works – Celebration and The Big Five-Oh! – this new mural celebrates 100 years of The Walt Disney Company by having characters from every all 62 Disney Animated Canon films released throughout Disney’s first 100 years in the business, from Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs to Wish, as well as a few familiar Pixar faces and live-action faces, gathering in Central Plaza for a grand nighttime celebration. Expect to see friends like Dumbo and Mary Poppins soaring near a glimmering Cinderella Castle, the Disney princes and princesses waltzing to the strains of music courtesy of the Seven Dwarfs and Miguel Rivera, Baloo and Mowgli enjoying a nighttime cruise along the rivers, Winnie the Pooh and his Hundred Acre Wood friends picnicking, and of course, Mickey and the gang in the center of the Hub, taking in all the wonder.

It is here in this theater, of course, that we watch a film about the life of the man who started it all, narrated by Julie Andrews…and Walt himself!

Upon exiting the theater, guests find themselves in the attraction’s post-show area, “The Legacy Continues.” This is an exhibit space offering guests a glimpse at Disney’s achievements post-Walt, via facts and trivia, movie props and costumes, even a wildebeest mask used in The Lion King on Broadway. There are also scale models of the four icons of Walt Disney World’s theme parks – Cinderella Castle, Spaceship Earth, the Tree of Life and Pharos Lighthouse; not to mention scale models of Disneyland Paris’ Sleeping Beauty Castle and the Tower of Terror.


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But that’s not all! When the film switched from The Walt Disney Story to One Man’s Dream, they also turned the Disneyana Collectibles shop held within the building into The Disney Gallery. In a private collection of portraits, paintings, caricatures and sculptures, The Disney Gallery serves as a showcase for the artwork of Walt Disney Imagineering and Animation, past and present. Special displays show rare storyboards from the Walt-era films, and Q&A sessions with Imagineers and artists happen on the occasion. Plus, if your wallet’s fat enough, you can purchase some of the items on display! Among the items on sale are paintings, limited-edition prints, cels, figurines and the much-coveted Walt Disney Classics Collection.

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Located to the left of the Exposition Hall is Tony’s Town Square Restaurant. To many Disney fans, this name may sound familiar. This is because this restaurant is inspired by the same Tony’s restaurant that served as the setting of one of the most iconic scenes in Disney history: the moment when Lady and Tramp fell in love on that “lovely bella notte.” Inside this beautiful restaurant, you'll find all sorts of Italian treats: pizza, paninis, antipasto, sausage, seasonal soup, salads, scampi, chicken parmesan, fettuccine, and, of course, spaghetti and meatballs. Plus, there’s plenty of vino and birra to spare; and quite a few authentic Italian desserts.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Our tour of the Magic Kingdom has officially begun! What did you all think of Town Square? And did you notice any of the hints at what lies in store here? Feel free to leave any feedback you have! Oh, but don't think we're fully done with Main Street. We still need to head down the street itself, which we shall do on Wednesday!

By the way, the introduction to this post -- with the girl eagerly spotting the Magic Kingdom -- came from an early version of @MANEATINGWREATH's Dream Resort thread. I thought it would be nice to include as a tribute to his work, given that Mirror Disneyland 3.0 is his final work here on the forums, and that his work would go on to inspire my own dream resort threads.

Why some Roger Rabbit music isn't on Magic Kingdom Main Entrance Music Loop such as Smile Darn Ya Smile, Eddie Valiant's Theme and Maroon Cartoon Theme? You've forgot about Who Framed Roger Rabbit music on Magic Kingdom Main Entrance music loop please add theme p-p-p-p-please?
 

DisneyManOne

Well-Known Member
Original Poster
Why some Roger Rabbit music isn't on Magic Kingdom Main Entrance Music Loop such as Smile Darn Ya Smile, Eddie Valiant's Theme and Maroon Cartoon Theme? You've forgot about Who Framed Roger Rabbit music on Magic Kingdom Main Entrance music loop please add theme p-p-p-p-please?
I'm sorry, but "Hooray for Hollywood" is serving as the only musical representative of Hollywoodland in this loop. Besides, I want to keep the number of songs the same. 30 songs in the video, 30 songs here.
 
Last edited:

DisneyFan32

Well-Known Member
In the Parks
Yes
I'm sorry, but "Hooray for Hollywood" is serving as the only musical representative of Hollywoodland in this loop. Besides, I want to keep the number of songs the same. 30 songs in the video, 30 songs here.
At least you could put two extra songs "Smile Darn Ya Smile" and "Maroon Cartoon Theme" please?
 

DisneyManOne

Well-Known Member
Original Poster
~ ~ ~ ~ ~

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From Town Square, we head down Main Street itself, a charming collection of storefronts and restaurants leading up to the park’s Central Plaza. Just like all the other Main Streets before it, the ground floor buildings are built on a 9/10 scale, with the second and third stories progressively smaller – forced perspective at work. Like the credits in a movie, the windows on Main Street are used to honor those who have contributed to the creation and development of the Magic Kingdom. Amidst the patriotic bunting, swaying trees and musical stylings of Scott Joplin and George Gershwin, we embark on a nostalgic stroll down Main Street. Here we experience the simpler pleasures of small town America as it were in the turn-of-the-century.

As with every other Main Street in the Disney pantheon, we begin with the lavish Emporium, the largest mercantile in the park. Owned and operated by Osium “Osh” Popham (the character Burl Ives played in the lesser-known Disney musical Summer Magic), this superstore evokes the charm and elegance of a turn-of-the-century department store, with stained-glass decor, gas chandeliers and sweeping rotundas in presentation of the goods and wares of a childhood dream. The clanging of cash registers matches the measured pace of the passing Main Street Vehicles. Countless clothing racks and near-infinite rows of display cases offering headwear, toys, pins, snacks and souvenirs line the tiled floor.


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Per tradition, storefront windows display vignettes from animated classics of Walt’s time, all brought to life with animated figures and unique lighting and effects. A golden plaque in front of each display briefly retells the story of the film. Here are the six films represented in the windows, and the scenes presented therein.
  • Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs: The same “Silly Song” display, albeit with updated figures.​
  • Pinocchio: Similar to Pinocchio’s Daring Journey at Disneyland, this display features Pinocchio performing in Stromboli’s puppet show. Jiminy Cricket disapprovingly watches on from a lamppost.​
  • Cinderella: No longer does this display feature Cinderella and Prince Charming waltzing at the ball. Instead, this display brings to life what is said to be Walt’s favorite animation scene: the Fairy Godmother turning Cinderella’s rags into a beautiful ballgown.​
  • Peter Pan: This display brings us into the Darlings’ nursery. Having just been sprinkled with pixie dust, Wendy, Michael and John are testing out their newly-acquired flying skills, as Peter stands at the window, ready to fly off to Neverland!​
  • The Jungle Book: On a lazy jungle river, Baloo and Mowgli float idly by, spinning to and fro along the gentle waves. Bagheera watches them from a tree branch...as do quite a few monkeys, who descend down from the trees to spy on the unknowing bear and Man-cub.​
  • The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh: In a scene from Winnie the Pooh and the Blustery Day, the featurette that won Walt his last (posthumous) Academy Award, Pooh and Piglet’s “deeds of bravery and generosity” are celebrated, as Christopher Robin, Eeyore, Rabbit and Kanga use a blanket to toss them high into the sky. Tigger and Roo jubilantly bounce nearby, and Owl stands proudly, watching the proceedings.​
Come Christmastime, these displays are swapped out with displays telling the story of Mickey’s Christmas Carol.

Moving further down the street, Sherman Music Co. – which replaced the original New Century Clock Shop in 1986 – is unique in its display of phonographs, radios, grand pianos, and brass horns. Instruments of all variety and origin are for sale, along with the world’s largest library of Disney sheet music. In addition, this shop displays a surplus of music-themed wares. CDs and records can be found here, as an old phonograph plays some classic music from the turn-of-the-century, mixed in with a ragtime arrangement of the occasional Disney tune here and there, particularly tunes written by the shop’s namesake, the Sherman Brothers. The popular “Walt Disney World Forever” kiosks allow for us to instantly download or create personalized playlists with selections chosen from various Disney World attractions, both operating and defunct, as well as classic songs from the Disney movies and television shows.


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The Kodak Camera Center sits opposite the Emporium. The storied camera store offers hour-long film development, cameras for rent, PhotoPass souvenirs and on-site photo experts. Patrons can also pose for a souvenir portrait in late 19th century/early 20th century costumes in the attached photo parlor. The music of a restored, antique player piano carries into The Chapeau, found right next door, a haberdasher’s paradise of hats and headgear, most notably the famous “mouse ear” hats, as designed by famous artist Roy Williams and first worn by the Mouseketeers of The Mickey Mouse Club.

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Moving further east from The Chapeau, you’ll find the southern entrance to the Discovery Arcade. Running the length of Main Street’s eastern side, this glass-roofed arcade is an eternal tribute to those who had imaginative, and sometimes bizarre, ideas and inventions for the future. From ingenious patents to dreams of a utopian world, it’s all here to see, with startling posters depicting what prominent American cities could look like in the future and display cases filled with visionary gadgets. The turn of the century gave those of the time a feeling that anything “can, and will” be achieved by man. The Discovery Arcade pays homage to these great minds, from their ingenious yet humble patents to their wildest dreams of futuristic cities. The Discovery Arcade is a nod to the never-built Edison Square concept made for Disneyland in California. While less ambitious, it does portray the charm of early 20th century living and offers a fun glimpse into what people of the time were using to improve their lives. It also acts as a nice sister attraction to the Carousel of Progress just minutes away in Tomorrowland, which Edison Square ultimately morphed into.

Among the items on display here are a player piano, an x-ray machine, a brownie camera, a projection camera (like the one they use at the Main Street Cinema), an early vacuum cleaner, a gas turbine, a bicycle, laminated glass, a wind turbine, a ballpoint pen, a Marconi radio, and models of a zeppelin and the plane used in the historic Kitty Hawk flight. Not only that, but there are also relics and models from the 1904 World’s Fair in St. Louis, which piqued the imagination of a young Walt Disney, given that his father worked for it. But perhaps the most beautiful element of the Discovery Arcade is the Winter Garden. Accessed from Center Street, directly in the middle of the arcade, this natural arboretum includes trees, bushes and fountains.

Heading up Main Street from the Camera Center, the intoxicating aroma of sugar, vanilla, butter and caramel leads all eager nostrils to the Main Street Confectionery, the place to go to satisfy your sweet tooth. And boy, oh boy, have we picked a good time to visit! You see, the Confectionery recently hosted the Sweetest Spoon Showcase, a competition for all aspiring home confectioners. The six winners of this year’s competition – who can also be seen among the Citizens of Main Street Streetmosphere troupe – are presenting their blue-ribbon baking to all of us. In addition to these winning goodies, freshly baked treats, caramel apples, gargantuan candy bars, cotton candy, chocolate rabbits, popcorn mixed with chocolate and other sweet treats, and more decadent delicacies line the shelves of this confectionery dreamworld. Front and center, a large replica of Cinderella Castle is displayed, built entirely from gingerbread. The glass-walled kitchen looks into the live “performance” of skilled candy makers at work.


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Nearby, the distinctive sound of cartoon merriment can be heard in all its ragtime charm from inside the Main Street Cinema. Beneath a vibrant, lightbulb-illuminated marquee, make your way inside an elegant Victorian-inspired building that recalls the great motion picture houses of yesteryear. Inside the theater, you can enjoy some classic Disney shorts that play on a never-ending loop, such as Steamboat Willie, Plane Crazy and Flowers and Trees. It’s the perfect way to get away from the crowds and just take a load off for a while! Moving on from the Cinema, we have Uptown Jewelers, which sells fine jewelry, china, clocks, Disney figurines and pins; as well as the Wonderland of Wax Candle Shop, which, like its Californian counterpart, has remained perfectly intact throughout the entire history of the Magic Kingdom. The scent of candle-wax and vanished flame fills the air; candles of every shape, size and color line the shelves and counters.

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The soft glow of gas-lit street lamps mark Center Street, the dead-center of Main Street, U.S.A. Center Street offers a great, out-of-the-way place to relax and enjoy a quiet moment away from the hustle and bustle of Main Street. Center Street also helps give the illusion that Main Street is bigger than it actually is, adding some depth to the area. Furthermore, Center Street is also home to some of Main Street’s other prominent businesses, and we can often hear their proprietors at work. For example, fittingly located right next door to Sherman Music Co. is Miss Sara’s Piano School, and we can hear three of her students at work. But be warned – Miss Sara can get quite strict sometimes. Across the street, above the toy shop (more on that later), you’ll find proprietors offering singing and dancing lessons, and we can hear the sounds of singing and tap-dancing from within. Other proprietors on West Center Street include a Chinese Hand Laundry, but the windows are closed there, so we can’t hear anything, a Livery, from which we hear the sound of horses neighing, and the Champion Cyclery, where the finest bikes in all Main Street are built. We can hear the machines rumble, as well as the familiar ding of a bicycle bell...and even a child giving one of the newly-made bikes a test run! On East Center Street, we find the Hotel Marceline, from which we can hear one tenant showering, brushing his teeth and shaving; as well as the office of Dr. E.S. Bitz, who apparently specializes in “Painless Dentistry”…although, the sounds of drilling and screaming seem to indicate that what the doctor really specializes in is false advertising.

Here on Center Street, the streets are wide open and merchants take use of the beautiful weather to sell wares outside. Along the western side of Center Street, you’ll find perhaps the most beautiful sight in all the Magic Kingdom: the outdoor wares of the Greenhouse Flower Shop. There isn’t a wilted petal in sight (because the flowers displayed outside are plastic). The flowers are always fresh. And yes, you can purchase your own flowers and plants here. Although most business occurs within the Greenhouse store, many people are more familiar with the vibrant colors of this outdoor marketplace. Also located along West Center Street is the Harmony Barber Shop. This real, working barbershop is the place to go if your hair needs a little trimming. It’s also quite the popular place to go for “baby’s first haircut.” Founded by the Dapper Dans themselves, they’ll often pop by to serenade those getting, or awaiting, a haircut of their own.


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East Center Street, meanwhile, is the place where portrait drawers are located to create a drawing for you. At the end of this alcove, a small seating area is available for you to rest a spell. In addition to Wonderland of Wax, there are a few more shops to be found here; the first of which is the famous Hallmark Card Shop. Founded in 1910 by Joyce Hall, Hallmark is the oldest and largest manufacturer of greeting cards in the United States. Main Street’s own Hallmark store delves in the sale of greeting cards, picture postcards, toys, gift wrap, candies, and Hallmark Keepsake Ornaments, a holiday staple. So beloved is this store that the Magic Kingdom could not bear to part with, hence why it moved across the street to this new location in 1985.

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Picture taken by shyguy of RCT3/Planet Coaster fan site shyguy’s World

The Hallmark Card Shop is flanked on both sides by two unique stores. On the right-hand side, towards the northern center of East Center Street, familiar-looking dolls are displayed in the storefront windows at Davis, Crump, Carlson, Gibson & Blair – Toymakers to the World, a shop named after the six people responsible for giving us the iconic look of “it’s a small world”: Marc and Alice Davis, Rolly Crump, Joyce Carlson, Blaine Gibson and Mary Blair. As the music of many a classic Disney animated film fills our ears, we find an offering of turn-of-the-century toys, as well as Disney-themed toys, children’s books, music boxes and stuffed animals. Above the shelves of the store, we find a vast collection of scenes and figures from the classic Disney movies, many re-used from past Emporium window displays, and a model train chugging along the perimeter of the store. As for the other store neighboring Hallmark, well, we’ll get there later.

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Moving on from West Center Street, we’ll find Disney Clothiers, boasting the largest Disney wardrobe in town. A seamstress is always on hand to make repairs and special souvenirs from scratch. Oh, and by the way, the Disney Clothiers building also features a door that supposedly leads to the Magic Kingdom Casting Agency. We can’t go in, but the door itself is a popular photo-op spot. Next door, the Penny Arcade features a number of vintage arcade cabinets from the turn of the twentieth century, including the turn-the-crank kinetoscope movies, mechanical fortune tellers, and various other tests of strength and skill. One will not find a single video game inside the Penny Arcade. All the coin-operated conveyances are of the mechanical variety. Next door to that, House of Magic acts as Main Street’s leading purveyor of fine magic tricks, gags and novelties; and master magicians are often seen performing sleight-of-hands and other tricks for passers-by.

Walt Disney was passionate about the value of books, so it is only natural that The Storybook Store take up residence on Main Street. This is your small, friendly neighborhood bookstore of yesteryear. The reading selection includes bestsellers, classics, magazines, and perhaps the world’s finest assortment of Disney-related books anywhere: Walt Disney World travel guides, books about Imagineering, history books, Walt Disney biographies, Japanese manga, behind-the-scenes documents, photo books, and books for children and adults about Disney films. And the interior of the shop itself is loosely inspired by the Madison Public Library, as run by Marian Paroo in the classic 1962 movie musical The Music Man.


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On the edge of the northwestern side of Main Street, overlooking the Hub, is Casey’s Corner, a tribute to the golden age of baseball (the restaurant even gets its name from “Casey at the Bat”). In this candy-striped place, servers clad in baseball uniforms serve up classic ballpark fare: hot dogs, soft pretzels, French fries, peanuts, Cracker Jack, you name it, in addition to desserts and fountain drinks. Casey’s extends into an outdoor eating garden, where guests can enjoy their food under candy-striped umbrellas. A ragtime piano player is often on hand, playing the latest rags and ragtime arrangements of classic Americana and Disney songs.

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Back on the other side of the street, moving northwards from East Center Street, is the Market House. Marked by a pot-bellied stove, this old-style shop offers all sorts of treats and snacks: cookies, candies, pretzels, cheese-flavored crackers and saltwater taffy. But the Market House’s biggest claim to fame is jar after jar of jellies and jams, all courtesy of Smucker’s. Not only that, but it’s here in this store that inquisitive guests can use an old-fashioned telephone to eavesdrop on the other end of a “party line.”

Heading towards the eastern end of Main Street, The Shadow Box Silhouette Studio is the place to go for a most unique souvenir. Talented artists are there to capture you and your family’s likeness in silhouette. Sharing building space with The Shadow Box, Crystal Arts sells exclusive Disney statuettes, glass miniatures, crystal castles, snow globes, dishware, music boxes, ornaments, and stylized silverware. Here, a talented glassblower creates hand blown souvenirs in full view of patrons, an attraction all its own. The Main Street Bakery is yet another good place to escape the hustle and bustle of Main Street, U.S.A. What’s on the menu here? Well, this is the in-park home of Starbucks Coffee, and in addition to that, the bakery offers a charming selection of dining options and bakery items.


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The Plaza Ice Cream Parlor takes up residence next door. In this old-fashioned eatery, ice cream is the name of the game. Specialty sundaes, ice cream sodas, root beer floats and triple scoop cones abound. Serving as a fitting neighbor to the ice cream parlor is the Plaza Restaurant. With tufted velvet furnishings, silk woven draperies, ornate floral carpets, beveled mirrors and polished brass fixtures, the Plaza recreates the elegance and refinement of the Victorian age. Whether it’s a hearty breakfast, mouthwatering lunch, or a family dinner with decadent desserts, you’ll discover something for everyone on the Plaza’s vast menu.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

And thus, our journey down Main Street comes to a close. Oh, but don't think we're fully done with Main Street. We still need to visit the Main Street-adjacent Central Plaza! Expect that post to come out this coming Saturday!

By the way, I'd like to point out that the concept for the Storybook Store came from @MANEATINGWREATH's Mirror Disneyland. It was too good not to use for this Mirror Walt Disney World, so all credit to him!
 
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DisneyFan32

Well-Known Member
In the Parks
Yes
~ ~ ~ ~ ~

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From Town Square, we head down Main Street itself, a charming collection of storefronts and restaurants leading up to the park’s Central Plaza. Just like all the other Main Streets before it, the ground floor buildings are built on a 9/10 scale, with the second and third stories progressively smaller – forced perspective at work. Like the credits in a movie, the windows on Main Street are used to honor those who have contributed to the creation and development of the Magic Kingdom. Amidst the patriotic bunting, swaying trees and musical stylings of Scott Joplin and George Gershwin, we embark on a nostalgic stroll down Main Street. Here we experience the simpler pleasures of small town America as it were in the turn-of-the-century.

As with every other Main Street in the Disney pantheon, we begin with the lavish Emporium, the largest mercantile in the park. Owned and operated by Osium “Osh” Popham (the character Burl Ives played in the lesser-known Disney musical Summer Magic), this superstore evokes the charm and elegance of a turn-of-the-century department store, with stained-glass decor, gas chandeliers and sweeping rotundas in presentation of the goods and wares of a childhood dream. The clanging of cash registers matches the measured pace of the passing Main Street Vehicles. Countless clothing racks and near-infinite rows of display cases offering headwear, toys, pins, snacks and souvenirs line the tiled floor.


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Per tradition, storefront windows display vignettes from animated classics of Walt’s time, all brought to life with animated figures and unique lighting and effects. A golden plaque in front of each display briefly retells the story of the film. Here are the six films represented in the windows, and the scenes presented therein.
  • Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs: The same “Silly Song” display, albeit with updated figures.​
  • Pinocchio: Similar to Pinocchio’s Daring Journey at Disneyland, this display features Pinocchio performing in Stromboli’s puppet show. Jiminy Cricket disapprovingly watches on from a lamppost.​
  • Cinderella: No longer does this display feature Cinderella and Prince Charming waltzing at the ball. Instead, this display brings to life what is said to be Walt’s favorite animation scene: the Fairy Godmother turning Cinderella’s rags into a beautiful ballgown.​
  • Peter Pan: This display brings us into the Darlings’ nursery. Having just been sprinkled with pixie dust, Wendy, Michael and John are testing out their newly-acquired flying skills, as Peter stands at the window, ready to fly off to Neverland!​
  • The Jungle Book: On a lazy jungle river, Baloo and Mowgli float idly by, spinning to and fro along the gentle waves. Bagheera watches them from a tree branch...as do quite a few monkeys, who descend down from the trees to spy on the unknowing bear and Man-cub.​
  • The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh: In a scene from Winnie the Pooh and the Blustery Day, the featurette that won Walt his last (posthumous) Academy Award, Pooh and Piglet’s “deeds of bravery and generosity” are celebrated, as Christopher Robin, Eeyore, Rabbit and Kanga use a blanket to toss them high into the sky. Tigger and Roo jubilantly bounce nearby, and Owl stands proudly, watching the proceedings.​
Come Christmastime, these displays are swapped out with displays telling the story of Mickey’s Christmas Carol.

Moving further down the street, Sherman Music Co. – which replaced the original New Century Clock Shop in 1986 – is unique in its display of phonographs, radios, grand pianos, and brass horns. Instruments of all variety and origin are for sale, along with the world’s largest library of Disney sheet music. In addition, this shop displays a surplus of music-themed wares. CDs and records can be found here, as an old phonograph plays some classic music from the turn-of-the-century, mixed in with a ragtime arrangement of the occasional Disney tune here and there, particularly tunes written by the shop’s namesake, the Sherman Brothers. The popular “Walt Disney World Forever” kiosks allow for us to instantly download or create personalized playlists with selections chosen from various Disney World attractions, both operating and defunct, as well as classic songs from the Disney movies and television shows.


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The Kodak Camera Center sits opposite the Emporium. The storied camera store offers hour-long film development, cameras for rent, PhotoPass souvenirs and on-site photo experts. Patrons can also pose for a souvenir portrait in late 19th century/early 20th century costumes in the attached photo parlor. The music of a restored, antique player piano carries into The Chapeau, found right next door, a haberdasher’s paradise of hats and headgear, most notably the famous “mouse ear” hats, as designed by famous artist Roy Williams and first worn by the Mouseketeers of The Mickey Mouse Club.

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Moving further east from The Chapeau, you’ll find the southern entrance to the Discovery Arcade. Running the length of Main Street’s eastern side, this glass-roofed arcade is an eternal tribute to those who had imaginative, and sometimes bizarre, ideas and inventions for the future. From ingenious patents to dreams of a utopian world, it’s all here to see, with startling posters depicting what prominent American cities could look like in the future and display cases filled with visionary gadgets. The turn of the century gave those of the time a feeling that anything “can, and will” be achieved by man. The Discovery Arcade pays homage to these great minds, from their ingenious yet humble patents to their wildest dreams of futuristic cities. The Discovery Arcade is a nod to the never-built Edison Square concept made for Disneyland in California. While less ambitious, it does portray the charm of early 20th century living and offers a fun glimpse into what people of the time were using to improve their lives. It also acts as a nice sister attraction to the Carousel of Progress just minutes away in Tomorrowland, which Edison Square ultimately morphed into.

Among the items on display here are a player piano, an x-ray machine, a brownie camera, a projection camera (like the one they use at the Main Street Cinema), an early vacuum cleaner, a gas turbine, a bicycle, laminated glass, a wind turbine, a ballpoint pen, a Marconi radio, and models of a zeppelin and the plane used in the historic Kitty Hawk flight. Not only that, but there are also relics and models from the 1904 World’s Fair in St. Louis, which piqued the imagination of a young Walt Disney, given that his father worked for it. But perhaps the most beautiful element of the Discovery Arcade is the Winter Garden. Accessed from Center Street, directly in the middle of the arcade, this natural arboretum includes trees, bushes and fountains.

Heading up Main Street from the Camera Center, the intoxicating aroma of sugar, vanilla, butter and caramel leads all eager nostrils to the Main Street Confectionery, the place to go to satisfy your sweet tooth. And boy, oh boy, have we picked a good time to visit! You see, the Confectionery recently hosted the Sweetest Spoon Showcase, a competition for all aspiring home confectioners. The six winners of this year’s competition – who can also be seen among the Citizens of Main Street Streetmosphere troupe – are presenting their blue-ribbon baking to all of us. In addition to these winning goodies, freshly baked treats, caramel apples, gargantuan candy bars, cotton candy, chocolate rabbits, popcorn mixed with chocolate and other sweet treats, and more decadent delicacies line the shelves of this confectionery dreamworld. Front and center, a large replica of Cinderella Castle is displayed, built entirely from gingerbread. The glass-walled kitchen looks into the live “performance” of skilled candy makers at work.


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Nearby, the distinctive sound of cartoon merriment can be heard in all its ragtime charm from inside the Main Street Cinema. Beneath a vibrant, lightbulb-illuminated marquee, make your way inside an elegant Victorian-inspired building that recalls the great motion picture houses of yesteryear. Inside the theater, you can enjoy some classic Disney shorts that play on a never-ending loop, such as Steamboat Willie, Plane Crazy and Flowers and Trees. It’s the perfect way to get away from the crowds and just take a load off for a while! Moving on from the Cinema, we have Uptown Jewelers, which sell fine jewelry, china, clocks, Disney figurines and pins; as well as the Wonderland of Wax Candle Shop, which, like its Californian counterpart, has remained perfectly intact throughout the entire history of the Magic Kingdom. The scent of candle-wax and vanished flame fills the air; candles of every shape, size and color line the shelves and counters.

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The soft glow of gas-lit street lamps mark Center Street, the dead-center of Main Street, U.S.A. Center Street offers a great, out-of-the-way place to relax and enjoy a quiet moment away from the hustle and bustle of Main Street. Center Street also helps give the illusion that Main Street is bigger than it actually is, adding some depth to the area. Furthermore, Center Street is also home to some of Main Street’s other prominent businesses, and we can often hear their proprietors at work. For example, fittingly located right next door to Sherman Music Co. is Miss Sara’s Piano School, and we can hear three of her students at work. But be warned – Miss Sara can get quite strict sometimes. Across the street, above the toy shop (more on that later), you’ll find proprietors offering singing and dancing lessons, and we can hear the sounds of singing and tap-dancing from within. Other proprietors on West Center Street include a Chinese Hand Laundry, but the windows are closed there, so we can’t hear anything, a Livery, from which we hear the sound of horses neighing, and the Champion Cyclery, where the finest bikes in all Main Street are built. We can hear the machines rumble, as well as the familiar ding of a bicycle bell...and even a child giving one of the newly-made bikes a test run! On East Center Street, we find the Hotel Marceline, from which we can hear one tenant showering, brushing his teeth and shaving; as well as the office of Dr. E.S. Bitz, who apparently specializes in “Painless Dentistry”…although, the sounds of drilling and screaming seem to indicate that what the doctor really specializes in is false advertising.

Here on Center Street, the streets are wide open and merchants take use of the beautiful weather to sell wares outside. Along the western side of Center Street, you’ll find perhaps the most beautiful sight in all the Magic Kingdom: the outdoor wares of the Greenhouse Flower Shop. There isn’t a wilted petal in sight (because the flowers displayed outside are plastic). The flowers are always fresh. And yes, you can purchase your own flowers and plants here. Although most business occurs within the Greenhouse store, many people are more familiar with the vibrant colors of this outdoor marketplace. Also located along West Center Street is the Harmony Barber Shop. This real, working barbershop is the place to go if your hair needs a little trimming. It’s also quite the popular place to go for “baby’s first haircut.” Founded by the Dapper Dans themselves, they’ll often pop by to serenade those getting, or awaiting, a haircut of their own.


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East Center Street, meanwhile, is the place where portrait drawers are located to create a drawing for you. At the end of this alcove, a small seating area is available for you to rest a spell. In addition to Wonderland of Wax, there are a few more shops to be found here; the first of which is the famous Hallmark Card Shop. Founded in 1910 by Joyce Hall, Hallmark is the oldest and largest manufacturer of greeting cards in the United States. Main Street’s own Hallmark store delves in the sale of greeting cards, picture postcards, toys, gift wrap, candies, and Hallmark Keepsake Ornaments, a holiday staple. So beloved is this store that the Magic Kingdom could not bear to part with, hence why it moved across the street to this new location in 1985.

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Picture taken by shyguy of RCT3/Planet Coaster fan site shyguy’s World

The Hallmark Card Shop is flanked on both sides by two unique stores. On the right-hand side, towards the northern center of East Center Street, familiar-looking dolls are displayed in the storefront windows at Davis, Crump, Carlson, Gibson & Blair – Toymakers to the World, a shop named after the six people responsible for giving us the iconic look of “it’s a small world”: Marc and Alice Davis, Rolly Crump, Joyce Carlson, Blaine Gibson and Mary Blair. As the music of many a classic Disney animated film fills our ears, we find an offering of turn-of-the-century toys, as well as Disney-themed toys, children’s books, music boxes and stuffed animals. Above the shelves of the store, we find a vast collection of scenes and figures from the classic Disney movies, many re-used from past Emporium window displays, and a model train chugging along the perimeter of the store. As for the other store neighboring Hallmark, well, we’ll get there later.

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Moving on from West Center Street, we’ll find Disney Clothiers, boasting the largest Disney wardrobe in town. A seamstress is always on hand to make repairs and special souvenirs from scratch. Oh, and by the way, the Disney Clothiers building also features a door that supposedly leads to the Magic Kingdom Casting Agency. We can’t go in, but the door itself is a popular photo-op spot. Next door, the Penny Arcade features a number of vintage arcade cabinets from the turn of the twentieth century, including the turn-the-crank kinetoscope movies, mechanical fortune tellers, and various other tests of strength and skill. One will not find a single video game inside the Penny Arcade. All the coin-operated conveyances are of the mechanical variety. Next door to that, House of Magic acts as Main Street’s leading purveyor of fine magic tricks, gags and novelties; and master magicians are often seen performing sleight-of-hands and other tricks for passers-by.

Walt Disney was passionate about the value of books, so it is only natural that The Storybook Store take up residence on Main Street. This is your small, friendly neighborhood bookstore of yesteryear. The reading selection includes bestsellers, classics, magazines, and perhaps the world’s finest assortment of Disney-related books anywhere: Walt Disney World travel guides, books about Imagineering, history books, Walt Disney biographies, Japanese manga, behind-the-scenes documents, photo books, and books for children and adults about Disney films. And the interior of the shop itself is loosely inspired by the Madison Public Library, as run by Marian Paroo in the classic 1962 movie musical The Music Man.


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On the edge of the northwestern side of Main Street, overlooking the Hub, is Casey’s Corner, a tribute to the golden age of baseball (the restaurant even gets its name from “Casey at the Bat”). In this candy-striped place, servers clad in baseball uniforms serve up classic ballpark fare: hot dogs, soft pretzels, French fries, peanuts, Cracker Jack, you name it, in addition to desserts and fountain drinks. Casey’s extends into an outdoor eating garden, where guests can enjoy their food under candy-striped umbrellas. A ragtime piano player is often on hand, playing the latest rags and ragtime arrangements of classic Americana and Disney songs.

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Back on the other side of the street, moving northwards from East Center Street, is the Market House. Marked by a pot-bellied stove, this old-style shop offers all sorts of treats and snacks: cookies, candies, pretzels, cheese-flavored crackers and saltwater taffy. But the Market House’s biggest claim to fame is jar after jar of jellies and jams, all courtesy of Smucker’s. Not only that, but it’s here in this store that inquisitive guests can use an old-fashioned telephone to eavesdrop on the other end of a “party line.”

Heading towards the eastern end of Main Street, The Shadow Box Silhouette Studio is the place to go for a most unique souvenir. Talented artists are there to capture you and your family’s likeness in silhouette. Sharing building space with The Shadow Box, Crystal Arts sells exclusive Disney statuettes, glass miniatures, crystal castles, snow globes, dishware, music boxes, ornaments, and stylized silverware. Here, a talented glassblower creates hand blown souvenirs in full view of patrons, an attraction all its own. The Main Street Bakery is yet another good place to escape the hustle and bustle of Main Street, U.S.A. What’s on the menu here? Well, this is the in-park home of Starbucks Coffee, and in addition to that, the bakery offers a charming selection of dining options and bakery items.


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The Plaza Ice Cream Parlor takes up residence next door. In this old-fashioned eatery, ice cream is the name of the game. Specialty sundaes, ice cream sodas, root beer floats and triple scoop cones abound. Serving as a fitting neighbor to the ice cream parlor is the Plaza Restaurant. With tufted velvet furnishings, silk woven draperies, ornate floral carpets, beveled mirrors and polished brass fixtures, the Plaza recreates the elegance and refinement of the Victorian age. Whether it’s a hearty breakfast, mouthwatering lunch, or a family dinner with decadent desserts, you’ll discover something for everyone on the Plaza’s vast menu.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

And thus, our journey down Main Street comes to a close. Oh, but don't think we're fully done with Main Street. We still need to visit the Main Street-adjacent Central Plaza! Expect that post to come out this coming Saturday!

By the way, I'd like to point out that the concept for the Storybook Store came from @MANEATINGWREATH's Mirror Disneyland. It was too good not to use for this Mirror Walt Disney World, so all credit to him!

I wonder what Hollywoodland's Music Loop will be like?
 

DisneyFan32

Well-Known Member
In the Parks
Yes
Essentially, Hollywoodland's main music loop will be the same music loop that plays on Hollywood Boulevard at DHS.


Except more movies score with old and new will played during the loop such as Titanic, Who Framed Roger Rabbit, Avatar, Superman (1978), Singin in the Rain, the Wizard of OZ, Fantasia, Mary Poppins, Star Wars, Indiana Jones, Rocky, Ghostbusters, etc...
 

DisneyManOne

Well-Known Member
Original Poster
And now, let us explore the very heart of the Magic Kingdom.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Central Plaza

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Like Disneyland before it, Main Street, U.S.A. leads into the heart of the park: Central Plaza, also known as “The Hub.” Central Plaza celebrates the wonders of nature and the joys of the imagination, offering to visitors an absolute escape from the everyday world. Shooting out from here like the cardinal points of a compass are paths leading to the other seven magical realms of the Magic Kingdom: Adventureland, Frontierland, Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge, Liberty Square, Fantasyland, Hollywoodland and Tomorrowland. The popular tunes from the early 20th century provide an orchestral backdrop for the color and excitement of the Plaza.

* Of course, Frontierland, Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge and Hollywoodland aren’t accessible via Central Plaza. You have to travel through either Adventureland or Liberty Square to reach Frontierland, and then travel through Frontierland to reach Galaxy’s Edge; and you have to travel through Fantasyland to reach Hollywoodland.

Central Plaza itself is an island, surrounded on all ends by a calm river. The Plaza is kept separate from Adventureland, Liberty Square, Fantasyland and Tomorrowland by a unique bridge, each designed and themed to their land of origin. For example, the bridge from Liberty Square is built of wood and stone, and is adorned with small candle-lit streetlamps (lit every night by authentic lamplighters), while the Fantasyland bridge – the one leading into the northeastern side of Fantasyland – is built entirely from medieval stone and mortar, with snarling gargoyles keeping watch. In 2015, the Hub was expanded to include lush fountains, colorful gardens, spacious lawns (which also serve as special viewing areas for fireworks) and shaped topiaries, all of which provide a quaint atmosphere. And with no shortage in picnic tables, benches or shaded trees (which are equipped with “twinkle lights” that provide a dream-like effect at night), the Central Plaza is an ideal place to relax and take in the scenery.

Central Plaza is an off-shoot to turn-of-the-century Main Street, U.S.A. Several musical groups associated with Main Street often perform in Central Plaza, including the Walt Disney World Marching Band, the Main Street Trolley Show and the Dapper Dans, who often travel past on their bicycle built for four, or hop on the Trolley to serenade those going for a ride. And on special occasions, the Castle Forecourt Stage is set up in front of Cinderella Castle. Normally, this stage only comes around for Halloween and Christmas, to perform shows during the respective holiday parties: the Hocus Pocus Villain Spelltacular and Celebrate the Season, the latter of which even features live musical accompaniment, and is often performed during the day in the days leading up to Christmas.

The Plaza Popcorn Wagon is one of several colorful snack wagons stationed throughout the Magic Kingdom. Like the Tokyo Disney Resort, each popcorn wagon is unique for its special flavoring. Such flavors include Butter (Main Street), Ghost Pepper, Lemon Pepper and Curry (Adventureland), Cheddar Bacon, Garlic Parmesan and Barbecue (Frontierland), White Cheddar and Red, White and Blue (Liberty Square), Honey and Cinnamon (Fantasyland), Oscar Gold Caramel (Hollywoodland), and Rocketship Ranch and Venus Vegan (Tomorrowland). And that’s not to discount the many churro, turkey leg, ice cream, and cotton candy carts also found throughout the Magic Kingdom. In fact, chief among these carts are two other Central Plaza institutions: the Plaza Ice Cream Truck, a legitimate, vintage ice cream truck that is often parked nearby the bridge to Liberty Square; and the Coca-Cola Truck, a mobile drink stand in the vintage tradition that often drives up and down Main Street.


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Standing proudly in the dead-center of Central Plaza, Partners is a storied tribute to Walt and his most treasured creation, Mickey Mouse. Walt and Mickey, hand-in-hand, look down Main Street, U.S.A., a timeless capture of a “man and his mouse”. A plaque at the base of the sculpture reads “We believe in our idea: a family park where parents and children could have fun — together.” - Walt Disney.

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Another quadrant of the Plaza plays host to the famous Plaza Rose Garden, a peaceful and tranquil path, where hundreds upon thousands are in bloom, chief among them roses. In fact, among these roses is one named for First Lady Barbara Bush! Not only that, there are shady trees, topiaries shaped like Mickey and Minnie, and an elaborate lawn, the perfect place for couples to exchange nuptials come nightfall. The Plaza Rose Garden is also a good place to meet up with your Disney friends. Throughout the day, various Disney friends make meet ‘n’ greet appearances here and throughout the Plaza. You never know who you’re gonna meet here!

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But that’s not all – from a special path within the Rose Garden, you can get a glimpse of the Magic Kingdom in a very special way via the Plaza Swan Boats. In the late 1800s and early 1900s, there was nothing more elegant than cruising down the river in a pontoon. I’m sure my readers will likely be thinking of the swan boats that have been cruising through Boston’s Public Garden since 1877. Well, it is in that spirit that the elegant vessels here at the Magic Kingdom strive to live up to. On board these boats, you can take a leisurely cruise around the waterways of Central Plaza, passing underneath the newly-implemented lawns, making a loop around the Swiss Family Treehouse in Adventureland, and even sailing right past Cinderella Castle.

The lavish Crystal Palace overlooks the western half of Central Plaza, nestled quietly between Casey’s and the entrance to Adventureland. Inspired by Victorian greenhouses of the late 1800s, the Crystal Palace brims with light, topiaries and tropical palms, not forgetting a collection of crystal-chandeliers and whirring ceiling fans. The Crystal Palace offers elegant buffets for breakfast, lunch and dinner, all of which offer a chance to dine alongside the gang from the 100 Acre Wood: Winnie the Pooh, Tigger, Piglet and Eeyore. And in-between the Crystal Palace and Casey’s, held within a small, out-of-the-way garden is a pavilion serving as the home of two important park amenities: the Baby Care Center and First Aid Station.


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On the other side of Central Plaza, just in-between the Central Plaza entrance to the Discovery Arcade and the entrance to Tomorrowland, is Walt’s – An American Restaurant. Walt’s is one of the most acclaimed restaurants to come out of Disneyland Paris. This is a luxurious restaurant featuring upscale American classics in an upscale setting inspired by the original Disneyland. It’s pretty much Club 33 in everything but exclusiveness. As such, the Imagineers decided to bring the restaurant state-side, replacing the Plaza Pavilion in 1993. It turned out to be a good idea in the end, because it helped to give Main Street a bit of feng-shui, with both this and Crystal Palace flanking the street.

Drenched in dazzling décor, this two-story Victorian manor offers the finest in upscale American fare. Upon entering Walt’s, you find yourself in an extravagant lobby, decorated with a grand piano, a bust of Walt, and relics from the pre-animation days, like a Zoetrope. The staircase leading up to the second floor even has pictures of some of Walt’s biggest achievements! As you can see, the lobby alone is gorgeous and has a ton of cool details. Even if you aren’t able to score reservations, it’s worthwhile to pop inside to check out the various pieces of Disney history on display. You probably won’t be able to go upstairs without dining at Walt’s. But once you get upstairs, it's a whole ‘nother ball game. Within the fanciful estate, silk draperies, ornate floral carpets, crystal chandeliers, silk woven draperies, beveled mirrors, polished brass fixtures and tufted velvet furnishings compose a lavish sight for the senses, all within nine unique dining rooms – three on the first floor, six on the second floor. Live musicians often accompany a luxuriant dinner by candlelight, often intertwined with a hint of romance.

The nine rooms of Walt’s are, as follows:


  • Walt Disney’s Room (First Floor): Reflecting on Walt Disney’s early days, the décor is themed around his childhood in Marceline, Missouri – the town that served as the biggest inspiration for Main Street.​
  • Lillian Disney’s Room (First Floor): Marked by a fireplace and fine china, this room highlights Walt’s wife. Photographs of the couple line the walls.​
  • Main Street Room (First Floor): Meant to further showcase the connection between Marceline and Main Street, this room features Herb Ryman’s designs for Main Street framed on the walls, and a model of the Main Street train station.​
  • Fantasyland Room (Second Floor): Gothic-inspired, this room features artwork themed around Disney’s fairy tales and the stories represented in Fantasyland (i;e sculptures of famous Disney princesses and heroes, concept art for Fantasyland characters, art inspired by Fantasyland rides), as well as a gilded portrait of Dorothea Redmond’s concept art for Cinderella Castle.​
  • Adventureland Room (Second Floor): Marked by artifacts from Africa and Asia, Marc Davis’ artwork for Pirates and Jungle Cruise, and even replicas of the José, Fritz, Pierre and Michael animatronics!​
  • Tomorrowland Room (Second Floor): The walls here are decorated with artwork from Tomorrowland throughout the years, as well as models of Space Mountain, Astro Orbiter, and even a golden Nautilus atop the fireplace!​
  • Seven Seas Lagoon Room (Second Floor): A small room featuring artwork inspired by the three hotels along the Seven Seas Lagoon: the Contemporary, the Polynesian Village and the Grand Floridian. There’s even photos of the hotels that inspired them!​
  • Liberty Square Room (Second Floor): Adjacent to Frontierland, this small room features original concept art for the Haunted Mansion, Liberty Square, and its predecessor, Disneyland’s Liberty Street. A miniature statue of Sam Eagle (he of America Sings, not of The Muppets) is prominently displayed.​
  • Frontierland Room (Second Floor): Basically one giant tribute to Marc Davis, this upscale Western library-inspired room features sketches from the Country Bear Jamboree and Thunder Mesa. The animatronic Hoot Gibson that used to be part of The Walt Disney Story was moved here.​
Right next door to Walt’s, located at Number 33 Main Street, U.S.A., is one of the Disney Parks’ “best-kept secrets”. A simple green door with “33” marked in gold next to it has long since been a place of wonder and mystery for Disney park fans around the world, for beyond that door lies… Club 33.

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Big thanks to @spacemt354 for this amazing concept art!

In the late 2010’s, it was decided to bring Club 33 to other Disney parks around the world. To that point, Walt Disney World’s Club 33 would, fittingly enough, be in the Magic Kingdom. And since the Magic Kingdom doesn’t have a New Orleans Square to it, the Imagineers decided to put the Club right next door to Walt’s namesake restaurant. The private, two-story club is exclusive to members only, and has a waiting list that runs well past a decade in length. Members pay a mere $25,000 just to sign up – not to mention yearly payments anywhere from $10k to $15k – entitling themselves entrance to the four parks of Walt Disney World (and not to mention an annual dose of 50 Park Hopper tickets to give to their loved ones), exclusive entertainment amenities, access to a private bar and dozens of other unique privileges. In addition, there are large windows in the lounge area of Club 33, providing excellent views of Central Plaza and Cinderella Castle, a view only amplified by the nightly fireworks.

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Central Plaza is also a good place to watch the Magic Kingdom’s various processionals. The route for these processionals begins in Frontierland, entering right past Thunder Mesa, going through Liberty Square, Central Plaza and down Main Street, exiting through a backstage entrance in-between the Fire Station and the Emporium. Throughout the day, you can watch various Cavalcades. Introduced in 2020, cavalcades are essentially smaller parades, but still nonetheless allow people to see their favorite characters. Their shortness also means guests won’t have to reserve spots in advance, and their frequent times mean that they’ll have plenty of chances to catch them. Oftentimes, once the cavalcade has gone backstage, the characters will then re-appear in Town Square (or in the case of one of these cavalcades, Central Plaza) to have meet ‘n’ greets around the area. The Magic Kingdom currently has four cavalcades going:
  • Mickey & Friends Cavalcade: Riding on two tiered floats and accompanied by a crew of dancers are Mickey, Minnie, Donald, Daisy, Goofy, Pluto, Chip, Dale, Clarice, Clarabelle, Horace, Max, Panchito and Jose.​
  • Royal Princess Processional: Rapunzel, Tiana, Anna and Elsa begin this cavalcade in a gazebo float, and they are followed by the iconic “mirror castle” float, which has been used in Magic Kingdom parades since 1984. Riding on this float are Snow White, Cinderella, Aurora, Ariel, Belle, Elena and the Fairy Godmother.​
  • Adventure Friends Cavalcade: Utilizing only two floats – both from the short-lived Move It! Shake It! Celebrate It! Street Party – this cavalcade features quite the company: 29 characters in all! It features: Woody, Buzz, Jessie, Mr. Incredible, Mrs. Incredible, Frozone, Miguel Rivera, Moana, Merida, Mirabel, Mulan, Raya, Tarzan, Terk, Timon, Baloo, King Louie, Aladdin, Jasmine, Genie, Nick Wilde, Judy Hopps, Alice, Peter Pan, Wendy, Lilo, Stitch, Mary Poppins and Bert. (This is the only cavalcade to offer a post-cavalcade meet ‘n’ greet in Central Plaza, as Town Square would be much too small to handle all these characters, even though only 16* take part in the meet ‘n’ greet due to the relative close proximity of meet ‘n’ greets for the others elsewhere in the park.)
  • Hundred Acre Cavalcade: This one doesn’t really utilize the full processional route. Instead Piglet, Eeyore and Rabbit take a ride on the Trolley, going up and down Main Street, as Winnie the Pooh and Tigger follow them on foot.​
In addition, the Rainy Day Cavalcade has often served as a last-minute happening in case the Florida rain puts the kibosh on scheduled parades; even before regular cavalcades were a thing.

* Those 16 characters being Woody, Buzz, Jessie, Mr. Incredible, Mrs. Incredible, Frozone, Miguel, Mirabel, Mulan, Raya, Nick Wilde, Judy Hopps, Lilo, Stitch, Mary Poppins and Bert.

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Of course, parades continue to remain a quintessential part of the Magic Kingdom experience; and the park currently has two – one for the day and one for the night. By day, we line up at the curb to see and hear the astonishing sights and sounds of the Remember the Magic Parade, a traditional cavalcade of favorite Disney friends, colorful floats and high-stepping dancers. Created in 1996 for Walt Disney World’s 25th anniversary, Remember the Magic is a celebration of all magic and imagination, ever evolving and changing through the years. The unbridled enchantment and vivid pageantry of fantasy winds its way through the park in a thrilling spectacular. The beloved parade features glorious, state-of-the-art floats, colorfully costumed performers on stilts, audience participation… and even a steampunk, mechanical, fire-breathing dragon! The current version of the parade runs year-round, only unavailable for the 4th of July, and the weeks leading up to Halloween and Christmas, when America on Parade, Mickey’s Boo to You Halloween Parade and Mickey’s Once Upon a Christmastime Parade respectively take to the streets; as well as for the occasional minor refurbishment, special event, or anniversary parade.

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By night, we line up at the curb once more for the illumination, mystery and illusion of SpectroMagic. Since the original Main Street Electrical Parade debuted in 1972, the world-famous concept of an “electric light parade” has since entertained audiences the world over. In fact, this vivid spin-off of the Main Street Electrical Parade has been delighting guests now for 35 years, having debuted in 1991 for Walt Disney World’s 20th anniversary. In this all-electric pageant hosted by Jiminy Cricket himself, over a half a million twinkling lights enthrall the senses in a “glimmering, shimmering, carouseling” world of vivid dreams, familiar characters and spectacular music.

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But that’s not all: two very special shows serve to end a day at the Magic Kingdom. First, in Once Upon a Time, Mrs. Potts, the matronly teapot from Beauty and the Beast, shares bedtime stories with Chip, taking them on a magical trip through the most adventurous scenes from favorite Disney films like Cinderella, Peter Pan, Alice in Wonderland and The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh. The show uses projection-mapping technology to cover every nook and cranny of Cinderella Castle in vibrant images that appear almost three-dimensional. But of course, that’s just the precursor to something truly amazing. After all, what would “Once Upon a Time” be without “Happily Ever After”?

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Yes, the Magic Kingdom’s signature nighttime spectacular truly lives up to its name, showing guests just how magical and emotional that fairy tale ending can be. Utilizing the finest in pyrotechnic and digital technology, Happily Ever After captivates spectators of all ages in a street-to-sky spectacular beyond imagination. One minute, we’re standing on Main Street, U.S.A., the next, we're transported into the timeless tales of Disney, from classics like Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, Pinocchio, The Little Mermaid and Aladdin, to modern hits like The Princess and the Frog, Tangled, Moana and Encanto. Characters and scenes from more than 50 Disney films are featured through state-of-the-art projections, enhanced by more than 50 choreographed spotlights, brilliant lasers and plenty of awe-inspiring fireworks. Plus, with an update created for the 50th Anniversary Celebration, new projection-mapping technology was set up, allowing all of Main Street, U.S.A. to become part of the magic. Paired with an emotional score, this nighttime odyssey drives the message home that anyone can grab hold of their dreams and make them come true as long as they are brave enough to listen to what guides them and bold enough to pursue their destiny. Happily Ever After celebrates the magic of Disney in an immersive spectacular, harmoniously uniting the past, present and future of the Walt Disney Company.

Here in Central Plaza, the stage is set before Cinderella Castle, a focus for the wonder that is the Magic Kingdom…


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Cinderella Castle is a fairytale world resplendent with pomp, circumstance and pixie dust. It is a fanciful icon with its roots engraved in pure fantasy, an everlasting symbol of peace, friendship and the power of imagination. The architectural style is a composite of French and Bavarian influence from the Middle Ages. The 189-foot tall spires appear to be even higher through the visual technique of forced perspective, with larger stones placed near the base, and progressively smaller ones toward the top. Hues of white, blue, silver and gold illuminate and reflect in the sunlight, a tasteful complement to the spiraling-turrets and vertical orientation. A magnificent clock rests above a balcony at the front. The lush greenery and peaceful waterways of the Central Plaza help to make Cinderella Castle even more picturesque.

“Good morning, dreamers of all ages, and welcome to the Magic Kingdom! All of us here are glad to have you as our guests on this special day. Whether this is your first visit or your one-hundredth, we know that there are many memories to be shared with friends and family, just waiting to be discovered. As Roy Disney said on Opening Day, ‘May Walt Disney World bring joy and inspiration and new knowledge to all who come to this happy place … a Magic Kingdom where the young at heart of all ages can laugh and play and learn – together.’ From all of us here at Walt Disney World, we hope you enjoy your day here in the Magic Kingdom! And now, for your safety and the safety of others, we ask that you please walk slowly and carefully to your first destination. Have a great day!”

At precisely 8:55 a.m., our Disney friends appear in the castle’s forecourt for a special ceremony called “Let the Magic Begin.” With the aid of Mickey Mouse, the Mayor of Main Street (or otherwise, the Fire Chief, or even one of the Dapper Dans), the Trolley Show dancers and a specially-chosen family, we are invited to help make a little magic to officially open the Magic Kingdom for the day, with the magic being made precisely at 9:00, the time the park officially opens! One thing is clear: Our time at the Magic Kingdom has just begun, and there are hundreds upon hundreds of great adventures and stories just waiting for us to discover!

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There we have Central Plaza! I'm sorry it took me a little later than usual to post this, but I had a rather busy day today. Nonetheless, this post is finally here and I hope you all enjoyed it! Now, the next portion of our journey will take us into the wilds of Adventureland, and you can expect the first of two Adventureland posts to come along this Tuesday -- October 18. See you then!

Oh, and with the recent announcement of Happily Ever After's triumphant return next year, expect to see this post get updated around the time it does re-open. They did promise the hit show would receive an update, so I'll edit it to describe what exactly those updates are. Likewise, regarding the opening ceremony, if the description is any indication, my idea is basically to utilize the original train station ceremony that played from the mid-2000s to 2017, when the new castle ceremony took over -- the reason why, I have heard, is that it was getting too cumbersome to get that many people in to view the train station show; and they feared it would be a potential safety hazard -- but to set it around the castle.
 
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DisneyManOne

Well-Known Member
Original Poster
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Adventureland

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Primeval, exotic and mysterious, Adventureland is a wonderland of both fact and fantasy. In this timeless realm of exploration and discovery, we leave the everyday world far behind, for here the atmosphere is filled with the sights and sounds typical of an isolated trading post on some hidden jungle waterway. Our senses are stirred by the sights of lush jungle foliage, the harrowing sounds of not-too-distant wild animals, and the aromas of tropical blossoms. We answer the call to adventure via a rickety, old footbridge lined with decor reminiscent of pulp adventure films of the ‘30s and ‘40s: Polynesian masks and tikis, African shields and spears, and primitive arrowheads. The giant thatched-sign welcoming us to the land glows eerily at night as bamboo torches illuminate the surrounding darkness. In the intense foliage below, unseen creatures snarl and screech. Our adventure is about to unfold…

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Stepping into Adventureland is like stepping into the reels of Raiders of the Lost Ark or The Jungle Book. The luscious and untamed landscape of the surrounding jungle hints at exploration and adventure... Rugged, weather-worn architecture of no specific origin protrude among the treetops, their occupants being the few brave merchants and settlers who dared to explore such an untamed region... Seldom ancient ruins decay among the plantlife, nearby excavation tools scattered nearby. This is truly a romanticized vision of an exotic world that never was, seemingly forgotten by time and popular culture. This first of two sub-areas of Adventureland is known as the Forgotten Kingdom.



As the legend goes, in 1930, notable archaeologist Dr. Henry Jones, better known as Indiana Jones, reunited missing fragments of a map scroll of parchment documenting the precise location of an ancient Bengalese temple. The Temple of the Forbidden Eye, containing countless intriguing artifacts buried beneath silt by a flood of the nearby rivers over two thousand years ago, is undergoing excavation for archaeological research. The temple deity Mara seems to conditionally offer one of three gifts to all who come to the hallowed site: earthly riches, eternal youth, or visions of the future. The only condition is that one must never gaze into the eyes of Mara. Although Jones’ discovery has set the archaeological community abuzz, his funding has run out. It wasn’t until Indy invited his good friend Sallah to the temple that the Forgotten Kingdom Exploration Team (F.K.E.T.) was formed and Sallah decided to capitalize upon the popular mythology of the temple to fund the excavation. Much to Indy’s dismay, Sallah opened the temple to tours from random visitors, such as you and I, with promises of riches unlike any other.

Soon enough tourists began flooding into the place, turning the desolate jungle into a luxurious tropical resort – the “Paradise Kingdom”, as it came to be called. Tourists spent millions upon millions foolishly exploring the temple in search of treasures the likes of which no man had ever known. Good fortune has come to many of the tourists who survive, but others have not returned. With this success came a whole slew of hopeful entrepreneurs and shysters, ready to make quick money off the tourists. From all corners of the world they came, setting up their own restaurants, tacky gift shops and tourist traps, each one branded in the style of their home turf. One notable visitor to the Paradise Kingdom was there long before Indy came. This visitor was Dr. Albert Falls, a major member of S.E.A. – the Society of Explorers and Adventurers – who famously discovered Schweitzer Falls and who founded the Jungle Navigation Co., Ltd. in 1911. He set up the Navigation Co. as a shipping business that moved cargo along the jungle rivers. However, once his granddaughter, Alberta, took over the company, business unfortunately declined. Noticing that the local area had become more of a spot for globetrotters than cargo shipping, a skipper approached Alberta with the idea to offer guided tours of the jungle rivers to passengers.

All was well until 1934 when Indy mysteriously disappeared into the depths of the temple. Locals believed the misfortune to be the work of ancient spirits and fearing the worst, tourists and residents alike fled from the jungle, slowly turning the town into the “Forgotten Kingdom”, as it came to be called.

Now, a hazy mist rains down from the trees as we enter the rundown colony, where tangled wires and excavation lamps illuminate the muddy streets and steamy swamps, flickering and fading in sync with a churning power generator in the heart of town. Crackling phonographs and old radios churn out big band rhythms of the ‘30s and ‘40s. Tattered canvas awnings, collapsed ruins and rusted excavation equipment establish a theme among the symphonic chatter of exotic birds, mischievous monkeys and the rhythmic pulse of distant tribal drums. Lush waterfalls, gurgling streams and lazy bayous flow into cattail-laced bogs, where giant leeches and hungry crocodiles undoubtedly lie in wait... Above the towering treetops, a crumbling, age-old temple looms before the haunting sunset, flamingos silently soaring past. Welcome to the Forgotten Kingdom, circa 1935.


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From the weathered statues of tigers and elephants scattered amidst the underbrush, to the false storefronts and houses owned by some adventurer or jungle denizen off on a fool’s quest, the Forgotten Kingdom is perhaps one of the most detailed areas ever conceived for a Disney park. Amidst architecture reminiscent of the colonies of French-Polynesia, British-Colonial India and the Caribbean, we first come across the entrance to the Tropical Hideaway. This is a small lounge blending together multiple styles – Caribbean, Indian, African, Chinese, Polynesian – all representing the various people who have come to the Paradise Kingdom. The Hideaway is found within a veranda, built along the edge of the Central Plaza waterways. Trace, yet noticeable, signs like suitcases and excavation equipment prove that the F.K.E.T. frequent this lounge. The gentle strains of steel guitar provide a soothing ambience for hungry travelers. The melting pot of cuisine is distinctly in influence from Hawaii, China and the Middle East. The outdoor veranda has interspersed detail that hints at an ongoing excavation in the surrounding vegetation.

But that’s not all the Tropical Hideaway has to offer. If you dine here, overlooking the waterways of Adventureland, you may find yourselves entertained by none other than Rosita, the cockatoo for whom José over at the Enchanted Tiki Room has pined over for so long. Indeed, for years, José has wondered where she had gone off to, and the answer is that she decided to strike it out on her own. Perched on a pile of junk, held inside a net, Rosita is always ready with a song and friendly conversation…and given that this restaurant shares real estate with the Skipper Canteen (more on that later), she’s picked up on how to properly tell a Jungle Cruise-level joke.

Heading back across the way from the Tropical Hideaway, we come across Bwana Bob’s merchandise stand, which boasts a full range of chic-jewelry to prepare you for jungle fashions, as well as offerings such as sunglasses, flip-flops, toy guns, and straw hats. Oh, and fun fact: the stand gets its unique name from the legendary comedian Bob Hope, as it is a reference to his 1963 film Call Me Bwana.

Right nearby, we find a path leading towards an old cave hidden deep among the dense jungle vegetation. According to the locals and historians of the Forgotten Kingdom, this cave is where the shamans of jungle civilizations past gathered to weave the tales of the jungle. Some say these tales are still told even today…


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In this cave, we are invited to relive the Legend of the Lion King. This show, which opened in Adventureland on July 8, 1994 – almost a month after the film first came to theaters – makes use of an expansion pad located near the Crystal Palace, an expansion pad just big enough to hold a theater. Stepping inside the cave, we notice the walls are decorated with drawings, inspired by real-life African cave drawings. One corner of this cave has a rock protruding out from it. When the time comes, the rock separates itself in two and pulls itself back to reveal Rafiki, the wise mandrill. Utilizing the “articulated head” technology found the resort over, Rafiki introduces us to the story he will tell. After his spiel, a screen closes in around the small stage and plays the film’s iconic “Circle of Life” sequence. Once that concludes, we are led into the main theater.

The main theater also has cave drawings along its walls, but what separates this from the pre-show area is the fact that this section of cave has been taken over by the vegetation. Vines, moss and branches are prominently present across the theater. The theater holds 500 people, who watch the show unfold across a 125-foot stage. In fact, the stage is bigger than the seating area in order to use gigantic sets, including an 18-foot Pride Rock. Of course, the main show re-tells the story of Simba, the little lion cub destined to be king, and his struggle to find his place in the “circle of life.” In order to bring the all-animal cast to life on stage, the show utilizes large puppets, known as “Humanimals.” The show also makes use of clips from the film, and in-theater effects, like wind and rain. The theater even rumbles during the infamous stampede scene! Altogether, the show runs 23 minutes (7-minute pre-show, 16-minute main show).

Continuing further down the paths of the Forgotten Kingdom, we find Sunshine Tree Terrace, a snack stand built within the building that hosts the Tropical Hideaway. Sunshine Tree Terrace is well-known for its Citrus Swirl and other citrus-based takes on ice cream, and it is also well-known for being the home of one of Walt Disney World’s most famous and endearing characters: the Orange Bird, who often appears outside to meet new friends.


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But believe it or not, this building hosts yet another food location – specifically, the Jungle Navigation Co., Ltd. Skipper Canteen. This patchwork cathedral of tropical tile patterns, hardwood latticework and French-colonial lighting fixtures is a wonderful place. In the wake of the Jungle Navigation Co. turning from a shipping business to a tourism business, the business boomed so much so that the Jungle Skipper Canteen was opened to feed hungry passengers fresh from their Jungle Cruises. Inside the Skipper Canteen, guests can enjoy “World Famous Jungle Cuisine” in one of several unique dining rooms – including the crew mess hall, the Falls’ family parlor and a once-hidden secret S.E.A. meeting room. The restaurant is even staffed by the skippers!

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From the pages of Jonathan Wyss’ novel Swiss Family Robinson, came the 1960 Disney film of the same name. And from the film, the Swiss Family Treehouse literally “grew” to life-size in Adventureland. The tree used six tons of reinforced steel and 110 cubic yards of concrete in construction. With over 300,000 handmade vinyl leaves and blossoms, the 60-foot high wonder is known as a Disneyodendron eximus, which means “out of the ordinary Disney tree.” As you approach the treehouse, the words of the family’s patriarch, as played by John Mills, may come to mind. “The world is full of nice, ordinary little people who live in nice, ordinary little houses on the ground...but didn’t you ever dream of having a house up in a treetop?” Resonating from a pipe organ salvaged from a shipwreck, we hear the memorable “Swisskapolka” throughout our climb and descent of the famous treehouse.

Steps away, we find a walkway leading towards Frontierland and Liberty Square, as well as a restroom area. Nearby this walkway is Colonel Hathi’s Safari Club, the first of two major stores found in the Forgotten Kingdom. Inspired by The Jungle Book, this shop offers Hawaiian shirts and paraphernalia, rubber snakes and insects, tiki totems and other rare trinkets and curios from the South Pacific, in addition to plush jungle animals, Disney character merchandise – particularly characters from films like The Jungle Book, The Lion King and Tarzan – and sundries and other “bare necessities” in an old temple setting, with lush trees, a small indoor waterfall and murals depicting scenes from the classic animated feature. The militant elephant often joins Baloo, Mowgli and King Louie for meet and greets across the way from his shop; while Rafiki and Timon meet guests nearby the bridge leading towards Legend of the Lion King, and Tarzan, Jane and Terk near the entrance to the Jungle Cruise.


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Continuing past the store, the guests arrive into the heart of the Forgotten Kingdom: a lush oasis of swaying palm trees and colorful tiki gods. The oasis evokes the ambience of a South Seas paradise, with lush foliage, cascading waterfalls and exotic blossoms. Truly, this is a world untouched by human interference. The music of the ‘30s fades away in favor of music with a more exotic flavor; music of Arabian, Polynesian and African descent. Moana, that intrepid young voyager, can often be seen meeting guests in a grove nearby.

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Surrounding the oasis on the right is the Adventureland Bazaar. When the park first opened in 1971, this Bazaar was a series of small shops – Tropic Toppers, Traders of Timbuktu, Tiki Tropic Shop, The Magic Carpet and Oriental Imports, Ltd. – all offering unique adventure-themed wares. But in 1992, when Aladdin became Disney’s latest smash hit, the original Bazaar was demolished and transformed into an elaborate Arabian marketplace, complete with Oriental carpets, brass fixtures, and colorful canopies. Adding to the ambiance, the atmosphere is filled with haunting musical sounds evocative of 1,001 Arabian Nights. This is a fascinating maze of winding lanes, little squares and exotic gardens, where merchants beckon and barter, craftsmen sit cross-legged plying their trades, and musicians – the Arabian Knights – play to the seductive trickle of a quiet fountain in their own bandstand.

Oriental rugs and fringed shawls hang from the rough adobe walls, while below sit dresses of the finest Egyptian cotton, Indian tablecloths, bags of scented Moroccan leather, and costume jewelry gathered from across Persia. A king’s ransom of exotic jewelry spills out into the streets from the Bazaar. East African tribal artifacts, handcrafted baskets, gaily painted pottery and strange wooden figures line the stone shelves. Mosaics and murals portray the icons and legends of 1,001 Arabian Nights, a collection of Middle Eastern and South Asian folk tales compiled in Arabic in the Islamic Golden Age. Aladdin, Jasmine, Abu, Genie, and even Jafar make their homes along the Bazaar, often wandering about, or staying put nearby the oasis, or nearby one of the bazaar’s rarest finds: the magic lamp!


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You know, as you walk through the Forgotten Kingdom, you may just get a spring in your step and feel that happy feeling one gets while adventuring. Maybe it’s just a trick of the atmosphere…or a trick of the wonderful side-effects given by the one and only Dole Whip sold at Aloha Isle Refreshments (a location which, because of said Dole Whip, is sacred ground among many Disney fans), which is a neighbor to Walt Disney’s Enchanted Tiki Room, where “the birds sing words and the flowers croon.” Having delighted guests since it opened at Disneyland in 1963, the Enchanted Tiki Room is a South Seas island adventure that features the singing of some 225 tropical birds, flowers and tiki gods. Even before entering the Tiki Room itself, we are given a taste of the tropical magic in store, as José’s cousin, Juan, serves as a “Barker Bird”, enticing guests to come see the show; and in a pre-show, two toucans named Clyde and Claude, voiced by Dallas McKennon and Sebastian Cabot, respectively, describe how they traveled the jungles of Adventureland and found the Tiki Room.

The colorful macaw hosts of this theater-in-the-round show – José, Michael, Fritz, and Pierre – welcome you into a tropical Polynesian display, to witness a musical extravaganza of songs and wonder. An extravagant feast for the eyes and ears, this theater-in-the-round show invites spectators to experience a land of joyous song and wondrous miracles – the beauty and magic of the Pacific Islands. The show has won the hearts of millions, and has entertained visitors to Disney parks for over a half a century. The five-song-strong soundtrack is among one of the most beloved in Disney theme park history, giving us songs like “The Tiki, Tiki, Tiki Room”, “Let’s All Sing Like the Birdies Sing”, and an increasingly-building version of “Hawaiian War Chant.” Originally, there were six songs performed, but the “Barcarolle” (from Offenbach’s “The Tales of Hoffmann”) was removed from the line-up in the mid-’90s. But, no matter how many songs come and go, Walt Disney’s Enchanted Tiki Room will always remain one of the Magic Kingdom’s most beloved classics.

Across from Walt Disney’s Enchanted Tiki Room is the Liki Tikis water feature, a Polynesian-inspired water playground for explorers looking to relax, refresh and enjoy a break from the dreadful weather of the mighty jungle.


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Past the ramshackle bazaars and small cafés, we make our way down a flight of stairs toward the near-reclaimed stronghold of an old boathouse, worn from years of monsoon damage, now rotted and entangled in rich foliage and exotic fungi. What lies ahead is anyone’s guess… Tribal masks, hanging cargo nets, storied photographs, timber canoes, and preserved specimens stand out among the interior décor of this ominous explorer’s launch. This is what else but the world-famous Jungle Cruise. As we leave the last outpost of civilization, we venture out into the exotic heart of darkness, where beautiful plants, fearsome beasts and other remnants of a pulp fictitious yesteryear reside… Aboard one of sixteen 30-passenger riverboats, we travel down twisted, “danger-filled” rivers through impenetrable jungles and mysterious waterways, where mischievous monkeys, bathing elephants and charging hippos roam. A band of exuberant gorillas invade a deserted safari camp, while a frenzied rhinoceros attempts to teach a misguided band of safari-goers the point of “location, location, location.” Per tradition, waiting around the final bend is the headquarters of salesman Trader Sam. After all, what would a Disney ride be without a gift shop at the end?

“Dateline: Paradise Springs, 1930. TOURISTS FLOCK TO MYSTERIOUS TEMPLE!

The remote jungles of a Forgotten Kingdom - from all over the world they are flocking here, following the strange story of a mysterious temple and gifts from the gods. The story begins, one year ago, world famous archaeologist ‘Indiana Jones’ follows a tattered map to an ancient edifice. Could this be the fabled Temple of the Forbidden Eye? According to Jones, the temple contains a Chamber of Destiny - where an ancient idol lured visitors with promises of gifts - eternal youth, earthly riches, or visions of the future. But, many who looked into the eyes of this double-dealing deity took a detour to doom! A chilling tale indeed... But not chilling enough to cool off the hot pursuit of thousands of greedy globe-trotters! They’re ready for a supernatural shopping spree…”

An overgrown bamboo forest and canyon of volcanic rock lead us well past the last outpost of the Forgotten Kingdom and into the midst of an archaeological dig. Crumbling relics and fallen artifacts lead our trail inside the clifftop Temple of the Forbidden Eye...

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Within the mysterious tombs of this long-lost temple, we follow Indy’s footsteps and encounter intricate booby traps, decayed skeletons, and the flutter of unseen vampire bats... Carvings and frescos tell the story of Mara, a powerful deity who promises great treasures…and vengeance to those foolish enough to gaze into its all-seeing eyes. The unearthed artifacts and shimmer of lanterns lead our steps to a rusty motor pool for Indiana Jones Adventure: Temple of the Forbidden Eye. The rugged troop transport vehicles will not only carry us down a well-hidden track, but also act as a self-contained motion base complete with audio system and safety apparatus, and looks for all the world like it belongs in the “Forgotten Kingdom” in the 1930s. Given the unique enhanced motion vehicle (EMV) system that was developed for this attraction, Imagineers were given free rein to create an adventure right out of the movies. Setting off aboard our transport, we enter into the Chamber of Destiny... Someone, probably you, foolishly looks into Mara’s eyes and, in no time at all, we are thrust into the midst of inconceivable dangers - screaming mummies, swarms of giant insects, spear-throwing wraiths, collapsing bridges, slithering snakes, and a massive, two-ton rolling boulder.

Indiana Jones Adventure is often perceived as one of the pinnacles of modern Imagineering. Its unique ride system, attention to detail and feeling of epic adventure have made it a beloved classic among Disney park-goers. When Indiana Jones and the Lost Expedition opened in Disneyland, it didn’t take long at all for plans to begin to take it over to the Magic Kingdom. Alas, they realized that they didn’t have enough space to do the full expedition, so they decided to just clone the EMV ride. But, they refused to let this budget cut stop them from going all-out with it. Therefore, when it was announced that this ride would be coming to the Magic Kingdom on March 4, 1996, they made sure to specify that not even the tiniest detail would be spared. The only major change the Florida equivalent received is an even more impressive temple façade that can be seen throughout Adventureland, enticing guests to come and explore the secrets of Mara for themselves. Indiana Jones Adventure is one of the Magic Kingdom’s major attractions, and unless you have no tolerance whatsoever for thrill rides, this is a “must do” attraction. This is a fantastic ride that does not disappoint.


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And there we have the Forgotten Kingdom section of Adventureland! Not many changes from the original MWDW post, but still quite fun to revisit. Of course, I must credit @MANEATINGWREATH for this Forgotten Kingdom backstory, which dates back as far as his 2016 Dream Resort thread.

Oh, and fun fact: Colonel Hathi's Safari Club is actually just a twist on something I created for the One Sentence Competition in 2020 called "Baloo's Bazaar." In looking up the original stores of the Magic Kingdom (a decision which also helped me set up Mirror Main Street), I learnt that Island Supply was originally called Colonel Hathi's, so I figured "Why not place my Jungle Book gift shop concept there?"

Now, the next post will be coming out on Thursday, October 20, and it's going to be a slightly shorter post. I say that because that post will be discussing Adventureland's second, and smaller, sub-area: Caribbean Plaza! See you all then!
 
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Suchomimus

Well-Known Member
Red, White and Blue
Sorry if I had asked this in an older MWDW, but does each color have their own corresponding flavor or is it akin to something like M&M's where all the colors are the same flavor? And how does this popcorn get its color? Is it candy coated?
S.E.A. – the Society of Explorers and Adventurers
And would the Society for Knowledge and Yearning per chance make an appearance in MWDW?
 

DisneyManOne

Well-Known Member
Original Poster
Sorry if I had asked this in an older MWDW, but does each color have their own corresponding flavor or is it akin to something like M&M's where all the colors are the same flavor? And how does this popcorn get its color? Is it candy coated?
I don't know if I told you this before or not, but I always envisioned Red, White and Blue popcorn getting its color from food coloring. It would still taste just like regular popcorn.
And would the Society for Knowledge and Yearning per chance make an appearance in MWDW?
Not sure yet. I have a specific idea for what I want to do with DisneySky in the Mirror universe (which, again, takes place in the universe that houses MEW's Mirror Disneyland 2021), but I want to run it by @D Hulk for permission first.
 

DisneyManOne

Well-Known Member
Original Poster
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Leaving the temple behind and heading back to the Forgotten Kingdom mainland, we notice something new regarding the landscaping. From our standing point we can smell the scent of “paradise”, a very nice tropical smell of fruit, fresh foliage, and clean seawater. On the other side of the path we can see the looming figures of various works of architecture. Walking down the trail, we leave the jungle-like atmosphere of the Forgotten Kingdom behind. The jungle has become a tropical paradise, lining both sides of the path. A crystal-clear waterfall pours down into a rushing stream. Nearby, a band of Hawaiian shirt-wearing musicians play a collection of steel drums and maracas. This encourages us to move forward and towards the other side of the bridge. As we continue, a sign appears reading “WELCOME TO CARIBBEAN PLAZA.”

No longer are we in the dense rainforests of the Forgotten Kingdom. We are now in the tropical paradise that is the Caribbean. Spanish-style architecture overtakes the plaza as dock-side shops and taverns line the streets. The smell of saltwater and all the delicious foods of the nearby restaurants fill the air and further strengthen the atmosphere. Tropical music fills the air, a nice departure from the swinging sounds of the 1930s music we’ve been hearing. Along the mainland, you may come across quite a few interesting entertainers. The Bootstrappers, a motley band of musical pirates, bring a sense of atmospheric charm to the long-lost seaport. Familiar faces from the Pirates of the Caribbean film series – Jack Sparrow, Will Turner, Elizabeth Swann, Hector Barbossa and Tia Dalma – can often be found wandering through Caribbean Plaza, as can Redd, a female pirate marked by her red hair. The Adventureland Steel Band is a Hawaiian-shirt clad steel-drum band, providing tropical tunes to all who care to listen. Inches away from the Steel Band’s stage is La Fuente de la Fortuna (“The Fountain of Fortune”), a fountain where you can toss pennies in to make a wish. All the pennies and coins thrown into the fountain are donated to charities.

de7f3-2.jpg




Dominating Caribbean Plaza is Castillo del Morro, an empowered stronghold meant to protect the thriving seaport from unwanted visitors. A telescope can be seen from the top of the Torre del Cielo watchtower. Inside this fortress, you can take off to face these rogues yourselves, aboard one of Disney’s most beloved theme park attractions: Pirates of the Caribbean.

Most of the development of the Magic Kingdom was done in the wake of this ride’s premiere at Disneyland in 1967. And although the new attraction was a resounding success, it was decided not to bring it eastward, as Florida was quite close to the actual Caribbean, and they didn’t want to seem redundant. But when the park opened, the most common guest complaint was “Where is Pirates of the Caribbean?” And to say that the executives were shocked was quite the understatement. They didn’t know how beloved these buccaneers really were! Thus, the plans for Western River Expedition, Pirates’ intended Floridian equivalent, were put on hold so they could build a new version of Pirates, which opened in Adventureland on December 15, 1973.

14494194799_0dccbc4622_k-1024x794.jpg

As we step foot inside Castillo del Morro, we hear the sounds of footsteps running overhead, voices yelling commands in Spanish, and the deafening sound of cannon-fire. Unlike the ride’s Disneyland counterpart, we’re not going back in time to the days when the pirates attacked Puerto Dorado. We are there. In fact, as we approach an escape route, we can see a ship on the horizon. The pirates are coming…

There is an escape route ready for us, and a boat is on the water ready to take us out of the fort before the pirates arrive. Sailing silently through the mysterious caverns in the underbelly of the Castillo, we are greeted by several eerie reminders of past pirate attacks. The thunder of rampaging waterfalls can be heard on every side, skeletons hold sway over a mountain of pirate treasure, and a haunting voice issues an ominous warning of danger lurking ahead…

“Ye come seekin’ adventure with salty old pirates, eh? Sure you’ve come to the proper place. But keep a weather eye open, mates, and hold on tight. [...] And mark well me words, mateys: Dead men tell no tales!

PiratesOfTheCarribbean_Disneyland-2.jpg

Making our daring escape via a waterfall, we find ourselves lucky to have escaped when we did. That pirate ship we saw in the queue, the feared Wicked Wench, has made its presence known; and we are suddenly caught in a crossfire between a stone-walled fortress on the right and the Wicked Wench on the left, the latter complete with bellowing Audio-Animatronics buccaneers and gunfire aplenty. After avoiding a barrage of flying cannonballs that land too close to our boat for comfort, we sail next into a seaport town where a few rum-fuddled looters ransack and burn the community, chase after and auction off valuable treasure, and sing and laugh to the iconic chantey, “Yo-Ho, Yo-Ho, A Pirate’s Life for Me.” And finally, with the sight of pirates trapped in jail, jealously watching their companions enjoy the vast wealth of treasure, we sail quickly away before the pirates can break out.

caextlpd.jpg




When our pirate adventure comes to an end, we make a quick detour through the Plaza del Sol Caribe Bazaar, where glittering jewels, treasure chests, gold doubloons and treasure maps hint at the loot within. Toy rifles, fool’s gold, plastic cutlasses, hook-for-hand replacements, miniature telescopes, pirate hats, and eye patches are all for sale. One corner of the Bazaar is home to Laffitte’s Portrait Deck, where we can pose for a practical portrait…in full pirate array, no less!

Nearby is the Caribbean Arcade, home to one-of-a-kind, pirate-themed arcade games in beautiful wooden cabinets with rope edges. Such “retro” games include “Freebooter Shooter”, a shoot-em-up game with drunken pirate-targets, and “Whack-a-Croc,” inspired by the pesky crocodile that follows Captain Hook. Fortune Red, a mechanical pirate soothsayer with a disgruntled grin and finger pointed at the X on an unfurled treasure map, offers to tell our fortune at the drop of a coin, no doubloons necessary. Next door to that, The Pirate’s League is the place to go for all wannabe pirates and mermaids to learn the tricks of the trade, and to don the robes and make-up of a seafarer. Basically, this is a piratical equivalent to the Bibbidi Bobbidi Boutique over in Fantasyland.

tortuga-tavern.jpg

Located just across the way from the entrance of Castillo del Morro is El Pirata y El Perico (“The Pirate and the Parrot”), a quick service Spanish-inspired restaurant themed to an old tavern. The bill of fare is Mexican and Spanish-influenced entrees, including chicken, beef, tapas, vegetarian burritos, taco salad, empanadas and nachos.

Golden%2BGalleon%2BInt.png

A secret path nearby the restaurant leads into a hidden courtyard of Caribbean Plaza, where we find two more shops. First is The Golden Galleon, specializing in all sorts of nautical wares: items in gold and brass, spyglasses, ship’s wheels, mirrors, and even ships in bottles and scrimshaw! Then there is La Princesa de Cristal, which is, essentially, an Adventureland take on Crystal Arts on Main Street – both are Arribas Brothers locations, and both specialize in unique glassware and jewelry, and feature live glassblowing. However, La Princesa has its own unique merchandise option: crystal ships!


~ ~ ~ ~ ~

With that, Adventureland is complete! What did you guys think? Please feel free to leave any thoughts or constructive criticism you have.

Now, the next two posts will be coming one after the other -- on the 24th and the 25th -- and those two posts will be covering the two sub-areas of "the wildest land in the wilderness", Frontierland! See y'all then!
 

DisneyFan32

Well-Known Member
In the Parks
Yes
~ ~ ~ ~ ~

90413-7.jpg




Leaving the temple behind and heading back to the Forgotten Kingdom mainland, we notice something new regarding the landscaping. From our standing point we can smell the scent of “paradise”, a very nice tropical smell of fruit, fresh foliage, and clean seawater. On the other side of the path we can see the looming figures of various works of architecture. Walking down the trail, we leave the jungle-like atmosphere of the Forgotten Kingdom behind. The jungle has become a tropical paradise, lining both sides of the path. A crystal-clear waterfall pours down into a rushing stream. Nearby, a band of Hawaiian shirt-wearing musicians play a collection of steel drums and maracas. This encourages us to move forward and towards the other side of the bridge. As we continue, a sign appears reading “WELCOME TO CARIBBEAN PLAZA.”

No longer are we in the dense rainforests of the Forgotten Kingdom. We are now in the tropical paradise that is the Caribbean. Spanish-style architecture overtakes the plaza as dock-side shops and taverns line the streets. The smell of saltwater and all the delicious foods of the nearby restaurants fill the air and further strengthen the atmosphere. Tropical music fills the air, a nice departure from the swinging sounds of the 1930s music we’ve been hearing. Along the mainland, you may come across quite a few interesting entertainers. The Bootstrappers, a motley band of musical pirates, bring a sense of atmospheric charm to the long-lost seaport. Familiar faces from the Pirates of the Caribbean film series – Jack Sparrow, Will Turner, Elizabeth Swann, Hector Barbossa and Tia Dalma – can often be found wandering through Caribbean Plaza, as can Redd, a female pirate marked by her red hair. The Adventureland Steel Band is a Hawaiian-shirt clad steel-drum band, providing tropical tunes to all who care to listen. Inches away from the Steel Band’s stage is La Fuente de la Fortuna (“The Fountain of Fortune”), a fountain where you can toss pennies in to make a wish. All the pennies and coins thrown into the fountain are donated to charities.


de7f3-2.jpg




Dominating Caribbean Plaza is Castillo del Morro, an empowered stronghold meant to protect the thriving seaport from unwanted visitors. A telescope can be seen from the top of the Torre del Cielo watchtower. Inside this fortress, you can take off to face these rogues yourselves, aboard one of Disney’s most beloved theme park attractions: Pirates of the Caribbean.

Most of the development of the Magic Kingdom was done in the wake of this ride’s premiere at Disneyland in 1967. And although the new attraction was a resounding success, it was decided not to bring it eastward, as Florida was quite close to the actual Caribbean, and they didn’t want to seem redundant. But when the park opened, the most common guest complaint was “Where is Pirates of the Caribbean?” And to say that the executives were shocked was quite the understatement. They didn’t know how beloved these buccaneers really were! Thus, the plans for Western River Expedition, Pirates’ intended Floridian equivalent, were put on hold so they could build a new version of Pirates, which opened in Adventureland on December 15, 1973.


14494194799_0dccbc4622_k-1024x794.jpg

As we step foot inside Castillo del Morro, we hear the sounds of footsteps running overhead, voices yelling commands in Spanish, and the deafening sound of cannon-fire. Unlike the ride’s Disneyland counterpart, we’re not going back in time to the days when the pirates attacked Puerto Dorado. We are there. In fact, as we approach an escape route, we can see a ship on the horizon. The pirates are coming…

There is an escape route ready for us, and a boat is on the water ready to take us out of the fort before the pirates arrive. Sailing silently through the mysterious caverns in the underbelly of the Castillo, we are greeted by several eerie reminders of past pirate attacks. The thunder of rampaging waterfalls can be heard on every side, skeletons hold sway over a mountain of pirate treasure, and a haunting voice issues an ominous warning of danger lurking ahead…


“Ye come seekin’ adventure with salty old pirates, eh? Sure you’ve come to the proper place. But keep a weather eye open, mates, and hold on tight. [...] And mark well me words, mateys: Dead men tell no tales!

PiratesOfTheCarribbean_Disneyland-2.jpg

Making our daring escape via a waterfall, we find ourselves lucky to have escaped when we did. That pirate ship we saw in the queue, the feared Wicked Wench, has made its presence known; and we are suddenly caught in a crossfire between a stone-walled fortress on the right and the Wicked Wench on the left, the latter complete with bellowing Audio-Animatronics buccaneers and gunfire aplenty. After avoiding a barrage of flying cannonballs that land too close to our boat for comfort, we sail next into a seaport town where a few rum-fuddled looters ransack and burn the community, chase after and auction off valuable treasure, and sing and laugh to the iconic chantey, “Yo-Ho, Yo-Ho, A Pirate’s Life for Me.” And finally, with the sight of pirates trapped in jail, jealously watching their companions enjoy the vast wealth of treasure, we sail quickly away before the pirates can break out.

caextlpd.jpg




When our pirate adventure comes to an end, we make a quick detour through the Plaza del Sol Caribe Bazaar, where glittering jewels, treasure chests, gold doubloons and treasure maps hint at the loot within. Toy rifles, fool’s gold, plastic cutlasses, hook-for-hand replacements, miniature telescopes, pirate hats, and eye patches are all for sale. One corner of the Bazaar is home to Laffitte’s Portrait Deck, where we can pose for a practical portrait…in full pirate array, no less!

Nearby is the Caribbean Arcade, home to one-of-a-kind, pirate-themed arcade games in beautiful wooden cabinets with rope edges. Such “retro” games include “Freebooter Shooter”, a shoot-em-up game with drunken pirate-targets, and “Whack-a-Croc,” inspired by the pesky crocodile that follows Captain Hook. Fortune Red, a mechanical pirate soothsayer with a disgruntled grin and finger pointed at the X on an unfurled treasure map, offers to tell our fortune at the drop of a coin, no doubloons necessary. Next door to that, The Pirate’s League is the place to go for all wannabe pirates and mermaids to learn the tricks of the trade, and to don the robes and make-up of a seafarer. Basically, this is a piratical equivalent to the Bibbidi Bobbidi Boutique over in Fantasyland.


tortuga-tavern.jpg

Located just across the way from the entrance of Castillo del Morro is El Pirata y El Perico (“The Pirate and the Parrot”), a quick service Spanish-inspired restaurant themed to an old tavern. The bill of fare is Mexican and Spanish-influenced entrees, including chicken, beef, tapas, vegetarian burritos, taco salad, empanadas and nachos.

Golden%2BGalleon%2BInt.png

A secret path nearby the restaurant leads into a hidden courtyard of Caribbean Plaza, where we find two more shops. First is The Golden Galleon, specializing in all sorts of nautical wares: items in gold and brass, spyglasses, ship’s wheels, mirrors, and even ships in bottles and scrimshaw! Then there is La Princesa de Cristal, which is, essentially, an Adventureland take on Crystal Arts on Main Street – both are Arribas Brothers locations, and both specialize in unique glassware and jewelry, and feature live glassblowing. However, La Princesa has its own unique merchandise option: crystal ships!

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

With that, Adventureland is complete! What did you guys think? Please feel free to leave any thoughts or constructive criticism you have.

Now, the next two posts will be coming one after the other -- on the 24th and the 25th -- and those two posts will be covering the two sub-areas of "the wildest land in the wilderness", Frontierland! See y'all then!

@DisneyManOne Guess what I'm doing different timeline of Disney-MGM Studios right now.
You can check this my topic:
 

DisneyManOne

Well-Known Member
Original Poster
~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Frontierland

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The year is 1885 as a proud sternwheeler makes its way up a muddy river. Stagecoaches and covered wagons make their way up the street, as simple townsfolk and Native Americans walk side by side. Gold miners sail out on makeshift rafts to the mines across the river, while music and laughter emits from the local saloon. And from the dense wilderness comes the whistling of trains and the lonely howl of a coyote, longing to be with its companions. The realm we have entered is an amalgam of sights and sounds that authentically conjure up images of America’s expansion. In Frontierland, the United States during the era when it was still a floundering young nation has been recreated and preserved for all generations to explore and appreciate. In this land of historical fact and fiction, wooded natural surroundings give way to a rustic frontier town. We have been whisked from the modern day and transported back to the dust-swept, horseshoe-scarred streets of a western settlement. The triumphant orchestral theme of a classic western film fills the air as we explore the little boomtown of Thunder Ridge.

In all the myths and legends passed down the old Chisholm Trail, Thunder Ridge was once the cutest little boomtown this side of the Mississippi. This was of course on account of the gold vein running through the mountain that gave this little town its name: Thunder Mesa. The biggest and most fanciful mountain range in the entire West - second to Bryce Canyon, Utah - Thunder Mesa brought the little boom-town from a little-known pioneer encampment to a bustling mining town overnight, bringing with it the advent of the railroad and riverboat, not to mention hundreds of would-be tycoons in the form of curious cowpoke and friendly foreigners. The once quiet town had more river and rail traffic than it could ever have hoped to handle.

Alas, there was something about the mountain that the settlers didn’t know... You see, long before the pioneers came, Thunder Mesa was a sacred spot to the Native Americans, and it carried a powerful curse – a curse that offered a powerful vendetta against the greedy and the selfish. Before long, the settlers’ desecration of the mountain caused the curse to be fulfilled; and the town was caught in the midst of a great earthquake. Though most townsfolk perished in the quake, some did survive, others fleeing for parts unknown. The mining operation went bust, and before long, Thunder Ridge was a ghost town, deemed “cursed” by miners across the frontier, an ominous reminder of the strange happenings and devastating quake of that fateful day.

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Today we visit Thunder Ridge just a few years past the great quake, warned and inspired by the various wood-carvings and relics of the Native Americans and the mountain’s curse found throughout town. But our time in Frontierland begins before we even set foot inside Thunder Ridge; for on the outskirts of town, serving as the transition from nearby Liberty Square to Frontierland, is the famous Diamond Horseshoe Saloon, home to the equally famous Diamond Horseshoe Saloon Revue. To an ice cream sundae and a bottle of sarsaparilla, we enjoy an Old West musical revue of can-can dancers, vaudeville routines and melodramatic punchlines. Other treats on the menu here include fried chicken, chili, sandwiches, hamburgers, French fries and fish and chips, with a wide variety of fixin’s and sides; as well as a wide variety of other ice cream treats and cookies. And to wash it down, an ice-cold Coca-Cola and other non-alcoholic beverages.

The show is a duplicate of the original Golden Horseshoe Revue at Disneyland. In fact, when the Magic Kingdom first opened, Wally Boag temporarily left the California show to help break in the Revue in Florida! Hosted by the one and only Slue Foot Sue, the Diamond Horseshoe Saloon Revue performs five hour-long shows per day, and to keep things fresh, different acts perform at certain shows. Among these acts include Mark Key, who likes to lead the audience in sing-alongs; and Lock, Stock and Barry, a comic sketch trio whose sketches often involve audience participation (basically, the Floridian equivalent of Disneyland’s former Laughing Stock Company). Of course, each show also features performances by Slue Foot Sue, genial Irish tenor Diamond Jim, a comical traveling salesman (who later portrays Pecos Bill), occasional guest stars and a vivacious troupe of can-can dancers, all of whom perform to the accompaniment of three musicians on piano, trumpet and drums, respectively.

Right next door to the Diamond Horseshoe, located right next to the passageway separating Frontierland from Adventureland, is the Westward Ho! Clothing Co. As if the name didn’t tip you off, this shop specializes in western-wear: cowboy hats, boots, spats and jeans.




The entrance into town is marked by a representation of a Civil-War era stockade turret. The American flag billows from atop the log-built turret, while poised-and-ready rifles peer over the walls of the fort, ready for battle. A hand-carved sign reading “Frontierland” hangs from the turret. Along the turret is a bridge leading over a small stream spilling out into the Rivers of America nearby. This is supposed to represent the Mississippi River, thus serving as our transition from the Colonial-era America of Liberty Square to the Wild West of Frontierland.

Across the way from the turret is the town's official welcome sign...

“Welcome to Thunder Ridge!
The Biggest Boom Town in the West!
Population: 1,110 - 888 - 303 - 119 - 24?
Elevation: Not Sure”

Yikes! Judging by the amount of times the town’s population count has been crossed out and replaced by a significantly smaller number, Thunder Ridge truly lives up to its “ghost town” status. Past the promenade and down the main thoroughfare, we feel as if we have stepped into the reels of a classic western, where cacti and tumbleweeds are the local flora. A cigar store Indian Chief stands guard from a shaded porch. Weary travelers seek refuge in quaint rocking chairs and a creaking hammock. Humorous wanted posters and aged advertisements (i;e “Pain for Less Dentistry”) line the sand-kissed facades and signposts, pulling our adventurous spirit deeper into this romanticized vision of the pioneer age.

Immediately to your left is the Frontierland Shootin’ Arcade, a good old-fashioned shooting exposition, where interactive elements and triggers make one feel as if they conquered the West. Nearby is the Frontier Trading Post, Thunder Ridge’s general store. Marked by its antler-covered rooftop (an old trick to attract cowboys), this shop – owned by “Texas” John Slaughter – is our go-to for any and all souvenirs of the Old West, from hard candies and knick-knacks to coonskin hats and sarsaparilla.

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In the center of town is the historic Grizzly Hall, home of the wildest show in the wilderness: Country Bear Jamboree. Henry, our ursine host, takes us on a musical journey through the music and lore of the Wild West. Starring in this frontier musical is a pack of bears unlike any we’ve ever heard. Henry’s job (like his mindedness) is simple: keep the audience in stitches, and introduce the stars of the show. The first group to suffer through a Henry introduction are the Five Bear Rugs, the finest assortment of instrument-playing bears the Magic Kingdom has to offer. After the boys in the band, we are introduced to Wendell, Liver Lips McGrowl, Trixie, Shaker, the Sun Bonnet Trio, Ernest, Swingin’ Teddi Barra, and the one and only Big Al, whom you’ll recognize immediately from the lousiest guitar-playing you’ve ever heard in your life. In addition to these bears, a trio of talkative trophy heads – Max the stag, Buff the buffalo and Melvin the moose – serve as a “peanut gallery” for the show, trading barbs with Henry. All these critters and more await an audience in the finest celebration of music and song this side of the great outdoors. Some of these bears – namely Big Al, Liver Lips, Wendell and Shaker – can often be found prowling about outside Grizzly Hall, ready for autographs, pictures and, forgive the pun, bear hugs with their adoring fans.

The Country Bear Jamboree changes its repertoire throughout the year, keeping things fresh and giving guests an incentive to “come again.” From January to May, the original 1971 Country Bear Jamboree entertains guests. And when June and summertime begin, the Country Bear Vacation Hoedown, which premiered in 1986, takes over Grizzly Hall. When September rears its head, the latest incarnation of the show – Country Bear Halloween Hootenanny (the creation of our own @MANEATINGWREATH), which debuted in 1994 – scares up some smiles, and come November, the show’s very first seasonal overlay – 1984’s Country Bear Christmas Special – is a delight.

The musical motifs of the Country Bear Jamboree provides a natural transition to what happens outside Grizzly Hall throughout the day. Let me tell you, it’s always somethin’ to see when Thunder Ridge comes alive with the sound of the Frontierland Hoedown! Accompanied by a live band of country musicians, some of our favorite frontier friends – the likes of the Country Bears, Woody and Jessie, Pocahontas and Meeko, as well as the classic Disney characters in their best Western attire – join a troupe of four dancing couples in a rowdy barn dance that really puts the “kick in country!” After a few rehearsed pieces from the musicians and dancers, we’re invited to come and join them on the dance floor, learning how to box step, pivot, hokey-pokey and so on. The show performs in the center of Frontierland in the off-season, and in front of Thunder Mesa during peak season, in order to make sure crowd flow is not held up.

But that’s not all: the center of Frontierland is also home to the Frontierland Stunt Show. At certain points throughout the day, an epic battle between bandits and sheriffs takes place on the streets and along the rooftops of Thunder Ridge. Expect to see falling ladders, flips and other acrobatics, and even a few dumb jokes in this thrilling Streetmosphere event!

Built from a converted Conestoga wagon, Big Al’s is the ultimate store for fans of the Country Bear Jamboree, with toy instruments, plush critters, specialized t-shirts, and a dramatic portrait of a much younger (and skinnier) Al on a journey down the Missouri. Moving along through Thunder Ridge, we come across Prairie Outpost & Supply. This is a rather unique store as it sells authentic western wares such as Native American-made blankets, figurines, and artwork.

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Next door to Prairie Outpost, an old saloon plays host to the Mile Long Bar. Named for its opposing mirrors that create the illusion of an infinitely long counter, the Mile Long Bar is a full-service bar of the Wild West, where all weary travelers can whet their whistles with decidedly non-alcoholic beverages: Coca-Cola products, apple cider, lemonade, in addition to delicious treats like frozen bananas, ice cream and other baked goods. Among the lively patrons of the bar are Max, Buff and Melvin, who have a second home here. They’re located above the entrance to the bar, and they're known for welcoming all diners with a hearty rendition of “Come On In.”

Next door is Pecos Bill Café, a quick-service restaurant that serves southwestern foods, hamburgers, onion rings, ribs and a complete salad bar, amongst many other things on the menus. The quick-service restaurant features both indoor seating, as well as an outdoor seating area, which makes for a prime seating location during the parades. If guests enter Frontierland from Adventureland’s Caribbean Plaza, it's safe to say that this is the first thing they’ll see. It’s not uncommon to see guests enjoy a meal at Pecos Bill’s, then head over to the Mile Long Bar for dessert. Speaking of, it’s not uncommon to see Pecos Bill himself and his beloved Slue Foot Sue meeting guests nearby the café.

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At the farthest edge of town is the Frontierland Railroad Station. This quaint, farm-like station serves as the second of three stops for the Walt Disney World Railroad.

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Past this ghost town and further into the Great Southwest, we come upon what might be the largest and most fantastical sight in any Disney Park today: Thunder Mesa. Rugged peaks, soaring rock walls, towering cliff tops, and thundering waterfalls are among the scenery of this massive mountain range, where a collection of attractions, hiking trails, Conestoga wagon and stagecoach rides and stunning views of the Magic Kingdom take up residence in this seamless amalgam of Bryce Canyon, Utah and Monument Valley, Arizona.

Intrigued (and intimidated), we head south to the foreground of the sprawling mountain range, first discovering the Thunder Mesa Railroad. Aboard a weather-beaten train of rickety ore cars, we ascend through the pleasant hills and buttes of Thunder Mesa, overlooking the serene prairie landscape. A steep incline, however, brings our journey to a jolt, as we scale the mountaintop and race through a narrow labyrinth of collapsed caverns… It’s clear the earthquake did a number on these mine trains, and the track starts to creak and move ominously… Will we be able to escape before the mine fully collapses?

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Below the Thunder Mesa Railroad station is the dock for Beaver Brothers Rafting Co., a flume ride that simulates the unique sensation of white-water rafting. The journey begins with boarding a wooden canoe, followed by passing into a cave at the foot of Thunder Mesa, and into the famous Rainbow Caverns. The caverns are dark inside, illuminated only by the pools and waterfalls of brightly colored, glowing water. The original, almost ethereal music from the Rainbow Caverns Mine Train and Mine Train Through Nature’s Wonderland at Disneyland fills the air. Through illuminated dyes, and under black light, the magic of Rainbow Caverns comes to life, a brief conclusion to our fantastic journey through the Old West. The many stalactites, stalagmites and weird rock formations are illuminated only by the omnipresent glow of the supernatural waters.

After this serene cruise through one of nature’s greatest landmarks, a lift hill takes us up to the top of Thunder Mesa, offering stunning views of Frontierland and Adventureland. However, this is where the white-water aspect really kicks into gear. We slip down through a valley of saguaros, followed by a rapid plunge down a long canyon river and some pretty intense white-water rafting. No bones about it: with the Beaver Brothers, you’re guaranteed to get soaked!



Having just survived a wild ride, the trains of the Thunder Mesa Railroad amble past the Mesa Terrace Restaurant. Basically the Western equivalent to Disneyland’s Blue Bayou, replacing the bucolic bayous of New Orleans with the gentle splendor of the Western wilderness at night. Remember the “Blue Shadows on the Trail” sequence that began the “Pecos Bill” segment of Melody Time? That’s the kind of mood we’re going for here. The entrance to Mesa Terrace is marked by a great many buildings, making up a small Western town. But in actuality, the interiors of these buildings are one, continuous whole, serving as the lobby and dining area of the restaurant.

The Mesa Terrace is perhaps the Magic Kingdom’s most elegant dining location – second only to Cinderella’s Royal Table – a timeless capture of the romance, beauty and elegance of a bucolic desert in the glow of moonlight. Here we might dine under the moon and stars while trains carrying passengers aboard the Thunder Mesa Railroad silently drive by, just before charting their course back to the station. We are surrounded in the essence of the Old West as overhead strings of lanterns cast an ethereal glow, dotting the darkness where crickets chirp, coyotes howl and fireflies wink. Elegant takes on classic Western barbecue await: steak, marinated chicken, pork chops, ribs, roasted gambas, and more.

On the outskirts of Thunder Mesa, overlooking the Rivers of America, is Lookout Point. This is the place to go in Frontierland if you want to meet some beloved Disney characters. Throughout the day, three different character groups – Mickey and the gang; Kenai and Koda; and Woody, Jessie and Bullseye – rotate doing meet and greets at Lookout Point and in front of the mighty Thunder Mesa. Miguel Rivera, the young musician from Coco, can also be found near Thunder Mesa, as well.

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Hiking Trails, Conestoga Wagons and Stagecoaches are among the “scenic” attractions of Thunder Mesa. Past rushing rivers, natural arches, the rickety tracks of the Thunder Mesa Railroad, and all the desert flora and fauna we could hope for, we explore the sandy trails and canyons of the soaring mountain range by foot, by Conestoga wagon or by stagecoach, almost blurred from the lines of reality. Thundering waterfalls and shaded tunnels lead our trail to a tabletop plateau, setting the stage for breathtaking panoramic views of the Magic Kingdom. The paths and vehicles continue down the mountainside.

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The star attraction of Thunder Mesa – if not the entire Magic Kingdom – is none other than the legendary Western River Expedition, the crowning achievement of Disney Legend Marc Davis. With this attraction, Marc hoped to outdo his previous success with Pirates, and make an attraction that would make Pirates look like a cheap carnival attraction. However, the road to glory was a bumpy one.

In 1971, a mere two months after Walt Disney World opened, Roy O. Disney, passed away. He had been Western River Expedition’s biggest cheerleader, and his successor, E. Cardon Walker – or simply, “Card” – was not too keen on the idea; instead, wanting to satiate guests’ overwhelming demands for Pirates. The Imagineers tried to sell him on what they considered would be the next generation of E-ticket attractions, but the new CEO would hear none of it. It seemed that Western River would now seem redundant with the addition of Pirates. Further complicating matters, concern was expressed over Marc’s portrayal of Native Americans, which were decidedly cartoonish, stereotypical, and not at all politically correct, even for the far-more-politically-incorrect ‘70s.

Thus, a compromise was reached. Construction on WRE and Thunder Mesa would begin in 1974, shortly after Pirates opened the previous December. In order to set itself apart from Pirates, WRE would be more of a thrill ride, with its climactic drop being higher than Pirates’ highest drop – by half as much, I should say. And furthermore, all scenes with the offensive portrayals of Native Americans were removed. And as 1974 began, so did construction on Thunder Mesa. For well over two years, guests to the Magic Kingdom watched as the mesa gradually took shape. And at long last, on July 4, 1976 – the Bicentennial of the United States of America – Thunder Mesa made its triumphant debut! And if there was ever an attraction guests flocked to on that day, Western River Expedition was it! In fact, WRE had the longest wait times of the day, barely beating out the wait for America on Parade, with guests lining up for that procession hours in advance!

Western River Expedition is an exhilarating flume ride through the legendary days of cowboys and Native Americans. In the vein of the classic Pirates of the Caribbean, this spectacular voyage of the Old West brings forth a fantastic production of Audio Animatronic figures, groundbreaking special effects, an original musical score, and thrills aplenty. Entering through a cave in the base of the old Thunder Mesa Mining Co., winding tunnels and abandoned mines pour into a fantastical canyon at twilight. From aboard a logger’s sailing barge, we embark on a spellbinding adventure beneath the stars, past constellations and clouds in the shape of western icons. The wise owl Hoot Gibson is our narrator as we drift through a cowboy camp at nightfall. Singing cattle lead into a stagecoach robbery by noon, where masked banditos and their masked horses take aim at their unsuspecting victims. Boisterous cowpoke, dancing showgirls, disapproving townsfolk, and vile outlaws take the little town of Dry Gulch by storm, most drunk on the spoils of a successful cattle drive.

As we relive the fateful storm that brought the mining town to its knees, a deadly wildfire engulfs the surrounding forest, sending our boat uphill and into further danger… The banditos have returned, and this time we’re the target. Amid crackling lighting, monstrous flames and rushing waters, we narrowly escape via waterfall – 40 feet down with a tremendous splash!

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The town of Thunder Ridge borders a Magic Kingdom staple: The Rivers of America. The Rivers of America represent the many great rivers of the North American continent: the Missouri, the Mississippi, the Rio Grande, etc., as they appeared in the time of American expansion. This eight-shaped river serves as the centerpiece of Frontierland.

The Rivers of America is bustling with activity, with various vessels gliding across the water, chief of which is the majestic Liberty Belle Riverboat, whose dock is located across the way from Thunder Mesa. Named for the famous American landmark, the Liberty Belle departs from a landing all-too-familiar with the architecture of New England. The Liberty Belle is an authentic reproduction of the historic vessels that ferried people up and down the mighty Mississippi River. A working steam engine converts the water from the Rivers of America into steam that in turn powers the large paddle that propels the boat. The 47-foot tall riverboat is comprised of three pristine decks:

Sun Deck, the “top deck”, the ideal place to enjoy the outdoors as you float down the river
Promenade Deck includes a salon, an outside wheelhouse and the Captain’s Quarters
Main Deck includes the boiler and pistons that run the paddle-wheel, as well as an outdoor viewing platform

A Magic Kingdom icon all its own, the stately steamboat brings passengers on a voyage around the Rivers of America thru a vast wilderness beyond imagination; giving us a glimpse of the beauty and splendor of the American frontier. A burning settlers cabin and village of Plains Indians are among the sights encountered along the riverfront. Wild animals and lush greenery stock the shoreline, where a chance encounter with foul river pirates and a fantastic, panoramic view of Frontierland’s mountain range allow the ultimate in thematic storytelling, brilliantly narrated by our down-to-earth captain from aboard the pilothouse.

The Davy Crockett Explorer Canoes launch from a nearby landing a few feet north, allowing man-powered journeys around and about the Rivers of America, narrated by a wise-cracking guide on either end of the hand-carved and hand-painted canoe.

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Another form of vessel is a fleet of old rafts that take us to the fun and adventure of Tom Sawyer Island. Here on this island, the works of Mark Twain come to life. This is an island where the likes of Tom Sawyer, Becky Thatcher and Huckleberry Finn might have played. Dusty dirt roads lined with sycamore and oak trees and creaky suspension bridges mark this natural haven. You may even stumble upon secret mined caves and uncover an age-old fort. Stepping foot on Tom Sawyer Island recalls the bygone days of youth in the 1800s, a vast forest, unremarkable to the adult eye, but to the eye of a child, a world where imagination can transform anything into a grand adventure.

The island is filled with suspension bridges to cross, tree houses and rocks to climb, trails to survey, caves to explore and an authentic replica of a frontier log fort: Fort Langhorn. Fort Langhorn was constructed from logs hewed by hand and trucked in from nearby mountains. The timber was floated across the Rivers of America and hoisted up to dry land, where it was assembled to create the realistic 19th century army fort. The fort stands perched on a lookout hill with a view of both the island interior and the river bend, which heightened its realism and sense of place.

Another major point of interest, Harper’s Mill, stands to the island’s southern shore, a mysterious beacon of exploration and discovery. Marked by the large waterwheel to its side, the creaky wheels and cranks still turn inside this place, since long-abandoned. And Disney nerds, take good notice here: a nest of birds is lodged between the wedges of one of the wheels inside the mill...not unlike a similar set of birds in the Academy-Award winning short The Old Mill. Added to the island in 1998, Clemens Lodge, designed after Disneyland’s equivalent to Harper’s Mill, is a rather rustic-looking building, presumably serving as a place of relaxation for all young adventurers. However, we cannot go in ourselves, as the Lodge mainly serves as a place to store equipment for something very special that happens here on the Island… And if all the exploring has made you hungry, Aunt Polly’s Dockside Inn offers home-style comfort foods and a seating area under a beautiful wood-carved gazebo, overlooking the Rivers of America.

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Welcome to Fantasmic! Tonight, our friend and host, Mickey Mouse, uses his vivid imagination to create magical imagery for all to enjoy. Nothing is more wonderful than the imagination, for in a moment, you can experience a beautiful fantasy or an exciting adventure! But beware… nothing is more powerful than the imagination, for it can also expand your greatest fears into an overwhelming nightmare. Are the powers of Mickey’s incredible imagination strong enough and bright enough to withstand the evil forces that invade Mickey’s dream? You are about to find out. For we now invite you to join Mickey and experience Fantasmic!, a journey beyond your wildest imagination.


On special nights (weekends in non-peak seasons, nightly during peak season), the Rivers of America are magically transformed into an amazing celebration of imagination, hopes and dreams. The incredible world of Mickey Mouse’s imagination comes to life in Fantasmic!, an extravagant nighttime pageant as viewed from the streets of Frontierland and Liberty Square. Tom Sawyer Island is the thematic stage for this timeless clash between good and evil, which uses state-of-the-art lasers, cascading waters, giant mist screens, breathtaking pyrotechnics, and extraordinary projection mapping to make the story come to life.

In Mickey’s dream, we witness the forces of good and evil engaged in conflict, where mischievous monkeys, pink elephants, wild cowpoke, magical genies, swashbuckling pirates, daring heroes, and waltzing princesses more surprisingly appear on and around the island and the surrounding waterways. But when Mickey is pulled into the Magic Mirror, the forces of evil are awakened as Queen Grimhilde summons some of Disney’s most dastardly villains: Ursula, Scar, Dr. Facilier, Chernabog, and Maleficent, the latter having transformed into a 45-foot, fire-breathing dragon!

Will Mickey triumph over the evil forces inside his imagination?


~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Yee-haw, that was a wild time! Then again, any time in Frontierland is a wild time. Ah, but the best part is: We're not even done yet! In this third iteration of Mirror Walt Disney World, Frontierland has gained a second sub-land! And that is exactly what we'll be exploring tomorrow! See y'all then!
 
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