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Mirror Walt Disney World 3.0 – The Definitive Version

DisneyManOne

Well-Known Member
Original Poster
Mirror Walt Disney World 3.0
The Definitive Version

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Last year, I started a project that I think is the favorite of all the projects I’ve done across ten years of being part of the online Armchair Imagineering community: Mirror Walt Disney World. Inspired by @MANEATINGWREATH and his Mirror Disneyland, Mirror Walt Disney World offered a look at how I would personally shape the history of the parks over time, from Opening Day to the present, mostly by resurrecting concepts that never made it past the drawing board, and by keeping a few old favorites open.

However, as time has gone on, I personally felt a bit creatively stifled by the project. I honestly thought the Port Disney concept that I used for the “new park” was very limiting, creative-wise. And likewise, I toyed with the idea of restoring Disney’s Hollywood Studios into my Mirror project, but I still felt there really wasn’t much to do there beyond just adding more attractions and adding just one more new land. (Maybe I’ll share how I’d make it work within this particular iteration of Mirror WDW somewhere later on down the line. I’m not quite sure yet.) Plus, as more and more new announcements have been made, I felt it would be a bit too tiring to try and find ways to weave them into this hypothetical Mirror universe. Thus, I decided to take a little break from posting these big threads here and work in private on finalizing what I consider my “definitive” Mirror Walt Disney World. Seriously, I have been working on this since October 1, 2021, the very day Walt Disney World turned 50.

And now, on October 1, 2022, 51 years to the day of the grand opening of the Most Magical Place on Earth, I proudly present to you all the result of a year’s worth of refining and re-working: Mirror Walt Disney World 3.0 — The Definitive Version.


 

DisneyManOne

Well-Known Member
Original Poster
Table of Contents

THE HISTORY OF MIRROR WALT DISNEY WORLD
  • The Magic Begins (Covering the origin of Walt Disney World, its Opening Day components, and a brief description of the Magic Kingdom)
  • One Little Spark (Covering the expansion of the 1970s, and the origin and a brief description of EPCOT)
  • The Circle of Life Continues (Covering the development of Disney’s Animal Kingdom)
  • Charting New Courses (Covering the other additions of the 1990s, and the origins and development of Disney’s Mythica)
THE TWO HUBS OF WALT DISNEY WORLD
MAGIC KINGDOM
EPCOT
DISNEY’S ANIMAL KINGDOM
DISNEY’S MYTHICA
SEASONAL EVENTS
 
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DisneyManOne

Well-Known Member
Original Poster
The Magic Begins

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There is a place where amazing things happen just to put a smile on the face of a child...

Where skies sparkle in moments of wonder that get to live forever as your memories...

A place where brothers and sisters actually get along, and families get to experience that rare delight of simply being family...

There is a place where magic lives...


Welcome to Walt Disney World.


As all Disney park fans know, these words opened the 2002 Walt Disney World Vacation Planning video, and never before have words so perfectly described the feeling of being at Walt Disney World. If you ever had a dream, and had that dream come true, then you already know about the magic Walt Disney World provides its guests. It is a magic that dates as far back as the founding of the Walt Disney Studios. Walter Elias Disney was many things: an animator, an entertainer, a family man, a pioneer in movies, television and in the modern-day theme park. But above all else, Walt was the very definition of inspiration. Time after time, this man has inspired people to follow their dreams and shoot for the stars, no matter what the circumstances. To this day, thousands of people continue to be inspired by the legacy of Walt, particularly the legacy he left that is Disneyland.

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Perhaps the most audacious experiment in a career filled with audacious experiments, Walt Disney built this “happy place” in the hopes that it would create a whole new form of family entertainment. “Disneyland really began,” Walt said, “when my two daughters were very young. Saturday was always ‘Daddy’s Day’, and I would take them to the merry-go-round and sit on a bench eating peanuts while they rode. And sitting there, alone, I felt that there should be something built, some kind of a family park where parents and children could have fun together.”

“To all who come to this happy place: Welcome. Disneyland is your land. Here, age relives fond memories of the past and here youth may savor the challenge and promise of the future. Disneyland is dedicated to the ideals, the dreams and the hard facts which have created America...with the hope that it will be a source of joy and inspiration to all the world.
— Walt Disney, July 17, 1955

And on July 17, 1955, Disneyland opened its gates to the world, and welcomed its people into a place like any other amusement park. Disneyland was never meant to be just another “county fair” or traditional amusement park. Instead, guests found themselves immersed into a land of three-dimensional fantasy. It was – and remains – a place where the world of today was left in favor of yesterday and tomorrow, fantasy and adventure.

But, old Uncle Walt was always looking for ways to “plus” his craft. He had heard that only 5% of people east of the Mississippi River (75% of the country’s overall population at the time) came to Disneyland. Plus, he disliked how other businesses were springing up around Disneyland’s sprawling 10,000 acres (only 350 of which were used for the park), and wanted control of a much larger area of land. And so, in 1959, they began to look for land for a second theme park/resort to supplement its Californian brother.


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In November of 1963, Walt flew over the sleepy town of Orlando, Florida. Seeing the well-developed network of roads, including the planned Interstate 4 and Florida’s Turnpike, with McCoy Air Force Base (which would later become the Orlando International Airport) to the east, Disney selected a centrally located site near Bay Lake. Although they used fake company names in order to get cheaper prices on the land – 30,500 acres of the stuff – the news soon was made public, and on November 15, 1965, Walt announced that Disney World was being built.

However, thirteen months after the announcement was made, December 15, 1966, Walt passed away from cancer. But his brother, Roy O. Disney, did not want to see his brother’s final dream fade away, so he deliberately postponed his retirement to oversee construction of the resort’s first phase. He even had the resort's name change from Disney World to Walt Disney World. In his own words: “Everyone has heard of Ford cars. But have they all heard of Henry Ford, who started it all? Walt Disney World is in memory of the man who started it all, so people will know his name as long as Walt Disney World is here.”


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Although the resort opened on October 1, 1971, the resort’s official dedication would take place twenty-four days afterwards on October 25. On that day, all eyes turned to Town Square as Roy dedicated his brother’s final dream.

“Walt Disney World is a tribute to the philosophy and life of Walter Elias Disney... and to the talents, the dedication, and the loyalty of the entire Disney organization that made Walt Disney’s dream come true. May Walt Disney World bring Joy and Inspiration and New Knowledge to all who come to this happy place ... a Magic Kingdom where the young at heart of all ages can laugh and play and learn — together.”
— Roy O. Disney, October 25, 1971

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When Walt Disney World first opened, the resort amenities were mainly set around the Seven Seas Lagoon, a 200-acre lake for real beaches and watersports, as well as the supplemental Bay Lake, which took up about 450 acres. The resort featured two hotels: the Contemporary Resort Hotel and the Polynesian Village Resort, a Monorail system and a Ferryboat system offering swift and efficient service between the various points of the resort, as well as two world-class golf courses: the Palm and the Magnolia. And if that wasn’t enough, the following November brought along the Fort Wilderness Resort & Campground, allowing guests the chance to authentically “rough it” out amid the wilds of Walt Disney World.

But far and away, there was one element of Walt Disney World that was considered to be its crown jewel: The Magic Kingdom.


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Basically the East Coast equivalent of the original Disneyland, but on a much grander scale, the Magic Kingdom followed in the footsteps of its predecessor and paid strict attention to its two biggest considerations: maintaining the theming of each area and ensuring easy access. For decades, world’s fairs and amusement parks had been confusing “nightmares” of environmental design. Each show or pavilion competed for the visitor’s attention like billboards along a highway. But rather than competing, Disneyland’s five distinct areas would compliment each other and contribute to the overall experience. However, the Magic Kingdom would open not with five areas; but with six…

Main Street, U.S.A.
“Here is America at the turn-of-the-century, looking towards the promise of a future full of promise, discovery and liberty. For those of us who remember the carefree time it recreates, Main Street will bring back happy memories. For younger visitors, it is an adventure in turning back the calendar to the days of grandfather’s youth.”

Adventureland
“Here is adventure. Here is romance. Here is mystery. Tropical rivers - silently flowing into the unknown. Windswept tales of danger on the Seven Seas… Temples containing both treasure and curse... The unbelievable splendor of exotic flowers… The eerie sound of the jungle - with eyes that are always watching… This is Adventureland.”

Frontierland
“Here is the story of our country’s past. The Wild West is reborn in this cinematic portrayal of the American Frontier. The mythos of Pecos Bill and Davy Crockett establish the colorful drama and adventure of the Old West in the exciting days of the covered wagon and the stage coach. Frontierland is a tribute to the faith, courage and ingenuity of the pioneers who blazed the trails across America.”

Liberty Square
“Here is a time in history when a new nation was destined to be born. This is the time of George Washington and Thomas Jefferson, the time when colonists made known their intentions to rise up against tyranny, the time when freedom was on everyone’s minds. Liberty Square is based upon the spirit of America and the ideals of ‘life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.’”

Fantasyland
“Here is the world of imagination, hopes and dreams. In this timeless land of enchantment the age of chivalry, magic and make-believe are reborn and fairy tales come true. Fantasyland is dedicated to the young and the young at heart, to those who believe that when you wish upon a star your dreams do come true.”

Tomorrowland
“Here is the future that ‘never was’ - or could be. The past, present and future coexist among the kinetic towers, soaring spacecraft, and alien creatures of this galactic starport. Tomorrowland celebrates man’s quest through time to realize his fondest hopes and dreams for the future. Here, imagination gives birth to innovation. Here, ‘what man can conceive, man can achieve.’”

Over the course of over 50 years in operation, the Magic Kingdom has grown to include three more “lands”, both with their origin and style in the same fantasy and dedication that first built the original six.

Mickey’s Birthdayland / Starland / Toontown Fair
“Here is the land Mickey, Minnie, Donald, Goofy, Pluto and all their friends call ‘home.’ This is the place where all toons can feel at ease, where wackiness and adventure are just an everyday occurrence. Within this humble community is the chance to meet up with beloved friends and join them in their latest escapades. Mickey’s Birthdayland / Starland / Toontown Fair is truly a place for all those who still listen to their inner child.”

Hollywoodland
“Here is a rose-colored look back at Hollywood in its Golden Age. Hollywoodland celebrates the epicenter of movie-making not as a place, but as a state of mind. Here, in a world where illusion and reality are fused together by technological magic, anyone can be the next big thing. Above all else, Hollywoodland well and truly is ‘the Hollywood that never was...and always will be.’”

Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge
“Here is the planet of Batuu, located in a galaxy far, far away. In a land torn asunder by an intergalactic war between the heroic Resistance and the loathsome First Order, imagination and adventure are waiting in every corner. Among the unique buildings and peculiar characters of this long-forgotten spaceport, the potential of the future of the Jedi rests within the hands of those who wish to learn of the Force’s great power.”

The former area has long since closed, having been swallowed up by an expanded Fantasyland, while the latter two are still open. Within all eight lands are a host of unique attractions, dining, shopping and experiences unique only to Disney. The Magic Kingdom truly is Disney magic at its finest.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

So begins the first major post of our sojourn through Mirror Walt Disney World. I intend to do these introductory posts as something of a day-to-day thing, and then maybe share most of the describing of the parks and amenities on more of a once-a-week scheduling. So, with that in mind, you would probably expect to see the next post coming tomorrow.

Well...funny story. You see, October 1, 2022 not only marks 51 years since Walt Disney World opened its gates, but 40 years since the second park to open did. And I figured...since it is this park's 40th, why not share that post with you one day early?
 

DisneyManOne

Well-Known Member
Original Poster
One Little Spark

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Even after Walt Disney World first opened, more and more new stuff was being developed – not just within the Magic Kingdom, but all around the land surrounding the park. A year after the place first opened, Walt Disney World saw the arrival of another hotel, the Disney Village Resort, as well as another golf course: the Lake Buena Vista Golf Course. In fact, the golfing aspect of Walt Disney World was so popular, that Disney went so far as to build a fourth hotel right in-between the Palm & Magnolia Courses, aptly named the Golf Resort, which was later renamed “The Disney Inn.” If the name sounds unfamiliar, you may recognize it by its current name: Shades of Green. The resort got that name when the U.S. Department of Defense bought the resort in 1994, turning it into a place exclusively for former and current members of the U.S. Armed Forces.

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But Disney, eager to play around with all the land they had at their disposal, wasn’t done just there. They were going to expand even further by adding more unique tourist attractions; the first of which was Discovery Island. Located on a centralized island in the middle of Bay Lake, Discovery Island was a wildlife sanctuary where guests could take a look at some of nature’s most fascinating creatures – snakes, monkeys, swans, tortoises, alligators and a whole host of beautiful birds

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But that’s not all: the people at Disney were positive that they would one day be able to achieve Walt’s biggest wish with this property: to build a fully-functioning city. You could say they started developing amenities for this city before they even built the city! Such was the case with the Lake Buena Vista Shopping Village, which opened on March 22, 1975. This was originally intended to be the city’s shopping area, but it ultimately turned into a shopping area for the guests of Walt Disney World. With views of the Disney Village Resort across the waterways, the Lake Buena Vista Shopping Village was meant to evoke a seaside New England harbor, with all sorts of wares and merchandise being ready for guests to purchase.

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The next year brought along another big development: Walt Disney World’s first water park! That park was River Country, built just a stone’s throw away from Fort Wilderness. And to describe the place … well, imagine if Tom Sawyer Island over at the Magic Kingdom was a water park. That’s basically River Country in a nutshell. In this down-home swimmin’ hole, guests could frolic and splash amid the natural beauty of Florida. The water for the main pool was directly connected to Bay Lake, in order to make for an authentic “swimmin’ hole” experience!

But among all of Walt Disney World’s growth and expansion, the biggest expansion of all was always set to be what Walt wanted the most…


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Walt Disney knew he would not see the completion of his “Florida Project” and that the job would be left to his brother Roy. Still, Walt would sit in his hospital bed at Saint Joseph’s Hospital in Burbank, across from his beloved Studio, and there, despite his condition, would plot and map the design of his new Florida property among the ceiling tiles of his hospital room. Although this project would contain an East Coast Disneyland in the Magic Kingdom, Walt’s biggest priority was for a little something he called “EPCOT.”

EPCOT was to be the heart of the Florida Project. When Walt Disney World opened in 1971, the actual geographic center of the whole forty-three-square-mile destination was where the EPCOT Center park was placed. It would be known as E.P.C.O.T. – the Experimental Prototype Community of Tomorrow. It was to be an ever-changing laboratory where the greatest minds could come together and solve the problems of the world as well as a community of nations that would serve as a showcase of harmony and goodwill. However, there were many downsides to this plan – for example, no one could retire, the behavior of teenagers would be heavily monitored, and living in general would take a backseat to showcasing the latest technologies. Some feared that it would turn into something out of a dystopian nightmare! Needless to say, when Walt died, the plans for E.P.C.O.T. were instantly put on the kibosh. While Walt’s visualized “Progress City” was never built, a spectacular scale model was, and still is, presented to guests as the post-show of Walt Disney’s Carousel of Progress at the Magic Kingdom.

In the late 1970s, then-CEO Card Walker wanted to revisit the E.P.C.O.T. idea. Still, the executives were wary and agreed that Walt’s vision for E.P.C.O.T. would not work in its initial design. Thus, a compromise was reached: The concept for E.P.C.O.T. would be turned into a theme park called “EPCOT Center”, so named because they believed that if the park was a success, they could potentially build Walt’s city of the future around it – thus, being the “Center” of EPCOT.


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“To all who come to this place of joy, hope and friendship, welcome. EPCOT is inspired by Walt Disney’s creative vision. Here, human achievements are celebrated through imagination, wonders of enterprise and concepts of a future that promises new and exciting benefits for all. May EPCOT Center entertain, inform and inspire and above all, may it instill a new sense of belief and pride in man’s ability to shape a world that offers hope to people everywhere.”
— E. Cardon Walker, October 24, 1982


EPCOT is arguably the biggest and most lasting mark of the entire resort, an incredible celebration of our cultural diversity, humanity, future, and history. EPCOT, which opened on October 1, 1982, tells the story of Earth’s greatest resource - its people. People from the past, present and future, and across the globe, are showcased in this tribute to our beloved planet and mankind’s achievements.

The park is made up of four distinct areas, each highlighting a different aspect of human experience, and altogether, the park boasts 31 pavilions. The magnificent Spaceship Earth marks the entrance to World Celebration, highlighting the spirit of innovation and the power of the human mind. World Celebration is the center of operations for all of EPCOT. Beyond Spaceship Earth, a pavilion devoted to the history of human communication, lush gardens lead towards Horizons, a pavilion devoted to showcasing the possibilities of human life in the future; the Celebration Center, the main headquarters of EPCOT’s yearly celebrations and festivals; and Journey Into Imagination, dedicated to the limitless power of imagination.

To the left of World Celebration is World Discovery, highlighting the sciences and technological advancement through four pavilions: Energy in Motion, focusing on applications of energy through kinetics and motion physics; Wonders of Life, focusing on health and the human body; Mission: SPACE, focusing on astronomy and the fascination with what lies beyond our humble blue planet; and Test Track, focusing on transportation by way of how cars are designed and tested.

To the right of World Celebration is World Nature, highlighting the natural wonders of our world, in accordance with the “land, sea and sky” triptych. Like with World Celebration and World Discovery, World Nature features four pavilions: The Land, focusing on ecology and humanity’s relationship with our planet; The Living Seas, focusing on marine life and what we can do to preserve our waterways; Journey of Water, an outdoor pavilion focusing on the water cycle; and The World Above, focusing on aviation and weather.

When EPCOT first opened, these three districts were united as one, under the name “Future World”, which was later named “Discovery World” as a result of Project Gemini, a complete park renovation that transformed the park for the new millennium. Nearly 40 years later, it was decided to split Discovery World up into three distinct neighborhoods, each with four pavilions to it.

Beyond these three districts, the path leads towards World Showcase, celebrating the many diverse cultures of our planet. When EPCOT opened, World Showcase represented nine nations: Mexico, China, Germany, Italy, the United States of America, Japan, France, the United Kingdom and Canada. These nine have since been joined by ten other nations: Morocco, Jamaica, Norway, Tanzania, Brazil, Jordan, India, South Africa, Thailand and Colombia.

Through this park, we are able to see humanity at its best, and we are given new hope for the future.


~ ~ ~ ~ ~

I'm sure that if you were to go over the pavilions of EPCOT, you'd notice two pavilions that may seem familiar to those who follow the various Imagineering games held here on the forums. Yes, this Mirror EPCOT will feature Energy in Motion, as created for Season 3 of One Little Spark by the Imagination Institute Interns, and The World Above, as created for Season 7 of The Sorcerer's Apprentice by Team Space. And I will be sure to credit all those who brough these pavilions to life when I discuss them in more detail later on.

Now, since I uploaded this particular post a day early, that means the next post won't be coming out until Monday. So stay tuned, because on Monday, we'll be going over the history of Walt Disney World's third theme park!
 

Twilight_Roxas

Well-Known Member
I can’t wait to see what you’re going to include in this version even if possible Avengers Campus depending if Universal doesn’t have the theme park rights to Marvel, and 20th Century Studios with The Simpsons along with the 100 anniversary of Disney.
 

Disney Warrior

Well-Known Member
The Magic Begins

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There is a place where amazing things happen just to put a smile on the face of a child...

Where skies sparkle in moments of wonder that get to live forever as your memories...

A place where brothers and sisters actually get along, and families get to experience that rare delight of simply being family...

There is a place where magic lives...


Welcome to Walt Disney World.


As all Disney park fans know, these words opened the 2002 Walt Disney World Vacation Planning video, and never before have words so perfectly described the feeling of being at Walt Disney World. If you ever had a dream, and had that dream come true, then you already know about the magic Walt Disney World provides its guests. It is a magic that dates as far back as the founding of the Walt Disney Studios. Walter Elias Disney was many things: an animator, an entertainer, a family man, a pioneer in movies, television and in the modern-day theme park. But above all else, Walt was the very definition of inspiration. Time after time, this man has inspired people to follow their dreams and shoot for the stars, no matter what the circumstances. To this day, thousands of people continue to be inspired by the legacy of Walt, particularly the legacy he left that is Disneyland.

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Perhaps the most audacious experiment in a career filled with audacious experiments, Walt Disney built this “happy place” in the hopes that it would create a whole new form of family entertainment. “Disneyland really began,” Walt said, “when my two daughters were very young. Saturday was always ‘Daddy’s Day’, and I would take them to the merry-go-round and sit on a bench eating peanuts while they rode. And sitting there, alone, I felt that there should be something built, some kind of a family park where parents and children could have fun together.”

“To all who come to this happy place: Welcome. Disneyland is your land. Here, age relives fond memories of the past and here youth may savor the challenge and promise of the future. Disneyland is dedicated to the ideals, the dreams and the hard facts which have created America...with the hope that it will be a source of joy and inspiration to all the world.
— Walt Disney, July 17, 1955

And on July 17, 1955, Disneyland opened its gates to the world, and welcomed its people into a place like any other amusement park. Disneyland was never meant to be just another “county fair” or traditional amusement park. Instead, guests found themselves immersed into a land of three-dimensional fantasy. It was – and remains – a place where the world of today was left in favor of yesterday and tomorrow, fantasy and adventure.

But, old Uncle Walt was always looking for ways to “plus” his craft. He had heard that only 5% of people east of the Mississippi River (75% of the country’s overall population at the time) came to Disneyland. Plus, he disliked how other businesses were springing up around Disneyland’s sprawling 10,000 acres (only 350 of which were used for the park), and wanted control of a much larger area of land. And so, in 1959, they began to look for land for a second theme park/resort to supplement its Californian brother.


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In November of 1963, Walt flew over the sleepy town of Orlando, Florida. Seeing the well-developed network of roads, including the planned Interstate 4 and Florida’s Turnpike, with McCoy Air Force Base (which would later become the Orlando International Airport) to the east, Disney selected a centrally located site near Bay Lake. Although they used fake company names in order to get cheaper prices on the land – 30,500 acres of the stuff – the news soon was made public, and on November 15, 1965, Walt announced that Disney World was being built.

However, thirteen months after the announcement was made, December 15, 1966, Walt passed away from cancer. But his brother, Roy O. Disney, did not want to see his brother’s final dream fade away, so he deliberately postponed his retirement to oversee construction of the resort’s first phase. He even had the resort's name change from Disney World to Walt Disney World. In his own words: “Everyone has heard of Ford cars. But have they all heard of Henry Ford, who started it all? Walt Disney World is in memory of the man who started it all, so people will know his name as long as Walt Disney World is here.”


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Although the resort opened on October 1, 1971, the resort’s official dedication would take place twenty-four days afterwards on October 25. On that day, all eyes turned to Town Square as Roy dedicated his brother’s final dream.

“Walt Disney World is a tribute to the philosophy and life of Walter Elias Disney... and to the talents, the dedication, and the loyalty of the entire Disney organization that made Walt Disney’s dream come true. May Walt Disney World bring Joy and Inspiration and New Knowledge to all who come to this happy place ... a Magic Kingdom where the young at heart of all ages can laugh and play and learn — together.”
— Roy O. Disney, October 25, 1971

colorful_photos_of_the_vacation_kingdom_03_1971_20120502_1289694758.jpg

When Walt Disney World first opened, the resort amenities were mainly set around the Seven Seas Lagoon, a 200-acre lake for real beaches and watersports, as well as the supplemental Bay Lake, which took up about 450 acres. The resort featured two hotels: the Contemporary Resort Hotel and the Polynesian Village Resort, a Monorail system and a Ferryboat system offering swift and efficient service between the various points of the resort, as well as two world-class golf courses: the Palm and the Magnolia. And if that wasn’t enough, the following November brought along the Fort Wilderness Resort & Campground, allowing guests the chance to authentically “rough it” out amid the wilds of Walt Disney World.

But far and away, there was one element of Walt Disney World that was considered to be its crown jewel: The Magic Kingdom.


tgmer00j8bty.jpg




Basically the East Coast equivalent of the original Disneyland, but on a much grander scale, the Magic Kingdom followed in the footsteps of its predecessor and paid strict attention to its two biggest considerations: maintaining the theming of each area and ensuring easy access. For decades, world’s fairs and amusement parks had been confusing “nightmares” of environmental design. Each show or pavilion competed for the visitor’s attention like billboards along a highway. But rather than competing, Disneyland’s five distinct areas would compliment each other and contribute to the overall experience. However, the Magic Kingdom would open not with five areas; but with six…

Main Street, U.S.A.
“Here is America at the turn-of-the-century, looking towards the promise of a future full of promise, discovery and liberty. For those of us who remember the carefree time it recreates, Main Street will bring back happy memories. For younger visitors, it is an adventure in turning back the calendar to the days of grandfather’s youth.”

Adventureland
“Here is adventure. Here is romance. Here is mystery. Tropical rivers - silently flowing into the unknown. Windswept tales of danger on the Seven Seas… Temples containing both treasure and curse... The unbelievable splendor of exotic flowers… The eerie sound of the jungle - with eyes that are always watching… This is Adventureland.”

Frontierland
“Here is the story of our country’s past. The Wild West is reborn in this cinematic portrayal of the American Frontier. The mythos of Pecos Bill and Davy Crockett establish the colorful drama and adventure of the Old West in the exciting days of the covered wagon and the stage coach. Frontierland is a tribute to the faith, courage and ingenuity of the pioneers who blazed the trails across America.”

Liberty Square
“Here is a time in history when a new nation was destined to be born. This is the time of George Washington and Thomas Jefferson, the time when colonists made known their intentions to rise up against tyranny, the time when freedom was on everyone’s minds. Liberty Square is based upon the spirit of America and the ideals of ‘life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.’”

Fantasyland
“Here is the world of imagination, hopes and dreams. In this timeless land of enchantment the age of chivalry, magic and make-believe are reborn and fairy tales come true. Fantasyland is dedicated to the young and the young at heart, to those who believe that when you wish upon a star your dreams do come true.”

Tomorrowland
“Here is the future that ‘never was’ - or could be. The past, present and future coexist among the kinetic towers, soaring spacecraft, and alien creatures of this galactic starport. Tomorrowland celebrates man’s quest through time to realize his fondest hopes and dreams for the future. Here, imagination gives birth to innovation. Here, ‘what man can conceive, man can achieve.’”

Over the course of over 50 years in operation, the Magic Kingdom has grown to include three more “lands”, both with their origin and style in the same fantasy and dedication that first built the original six.

Mickey’s Birthdayland / Starland / Toontown Fair
“Here is the land Mickey, Minnie, Donald, Goofy, Pluto and all their friends call ‘home.’ This is the place where all toons can feel at ease, where wackiness and adventure are just an everyday occurrence. Within this humble community is the chance to meet up with beloved friends and join them in their latest escapades. Mickey’s Birthdayland / Starland / Toontown Fair is truly a place for all those who still listen to their inner child.”

Hollywoodland
“Here is a rose-colored look back at Hollywood in its Golden Age. Hollywoodland celebrates the epicenter of movie-making not as a place, but as a state of mind. Here, in a world where illusion and reality are fused together by technological magic, anyone can be the next big thing. Above all else, Hollywoodland well and truly is ‘the Hollywood that never was...and always will be.’”

Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge
“Here is the planet of Batuu, located in a galaxy far, far away. In a land torn asunder by an intergalactic war between the heroic Resistance and the loathsome First Order, imagination and adventure are waiting in every corner. Among the unique buildings and peculiar characters of this long-forgotten spaceport, the potential of the future of the Jedi rests within the hands of those who wish to learn of the Force’s great power.”

The former area has long since closed, having been swallowed up by an expanded Fantasyland, while the latter two are still open. Within all eight lands are a host of unique attractions, dining, shopping and experiences unique only to Disney. The Magic Kingdom truly is Disney magic at its finest.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

So begins the first major post of our sojourn through Mirror Walt Disney World. I intend to do these introductory posts as something of a day-to-day thing, and then maybe share most of the describing of the parks and amenities on more of a once-a-week scheduling. So, with that in mind, you would probably expect to see the next post coming tomorrow.

Well...funny story. You see, October 1, 2022 not only marks 51 years since Walt Disney World opened its gates, but 40 years since the second park to open did. And I figured...since it is this park's 40th, why not share that post with you one day early?

Great to see Mirror WDW again, it’s one of my favorite projects on this forum. I wonder where you put Star Wars in Magic Kingdom, is it near Frontierland?
 

DisneyFan32

Well-Known Member
In the Parks
Yes
One Little Spark

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Even after Walt Disney World first opened, more and more new stuff was being developed – not just within the Magic Kingdom, but all around the land surrounding the park. A year after the place first opened, Walt Disney World saw the arrival of another hotel, the Disney Village Resort, as well as another golf course: the Lake Buena Vista Golf Course. In fact, the golfing aspect of Walt Disney World was so popular, that Disney went so far as to build a fourth hotel right in-between the Palm & Magnolia Courses, aptly named the Golf Resort, which was later renamed “The Disney Inn.” If the name sounds unfamiliar, you may recognize it by its current name: Shades of Green. The resort got that name when the U.S. Department of Defense bought the resort in 1994, turning it into a place exclusively for former and current members of the U.S. Armed Forces.

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But Disney, eager to play around with all the land they had at their disposal, wasn’t done just there. They were going to expand even further by adding more unique tourist attractions; the first of which was Discovery Island. Located on a centralized island in the middle of Bay Lake, Discovery Island was a wildlife sanctuary where guests could take a look at some of nature’s most fascinating creatures – snakes, monkeys, swans, tortoises, alligators and a whole host of beautiful birds

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But that’s not all: the people at Disney were positive that they would one day be able to achieve Walt’s biggest wish with this property: to build a fully-functioning city. You could say they started developing amenities for this city before they even built the city! Such was the case with the Lake Buena Vista Shopping Village, which opened on March 22, 1975. This was originally intended to be the city’s shopping area, but it ultimately turned into a shopping area for the guests of Walt Disney World. With views of the Disney Village Resort across the waterways, the Lake Buena Vista Shopping Village was meant to evoke a seaside New England harbor, with all sorts of wares and merchandise being ready for guests to purchase.

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The next year brought along another big development: Walt Disney World’s first water park! That park was River Country, built just a stone’s throw away from Fort Wilderness. And to describe the place … well, imagine if Tom Sawyer Island over at the Magic Kingdom was a water park. That’s basically River Country in a nutshell. In this down-home swimmin’ hole, guests could frolic and splash amid the natural beauty of Florida. The water for the main pool was directly connected to Bay Lake, in order to make for an authentic “swimmin’ hole” experience!

But among all of Walt Disney World’s growth and expansion, the biggest expansion of all was always set to be what Walt wanted the most…


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Walt Disney knew he would not see the completion of his “Florida Project” and that the job would be left to his brother Roy. Still, Walt would sit in his hospital bed at Saint Joseph’s Hospital in Burbank, across from his beloved Studio, and there, despite his condition, would plot and map the design of his new Florida property among the ceiling tiles of his hospital room. Although this project would contain an East Coast Disneyland in the Magic Kingdom, Walt’s biggest priority was for a little something he called “EPCOT.”

EPCOT was to be the heart of the Florida Project. When Walt Disney World opened in 1971, the actual geographic center of the whole forty-three-square-mile destination was where the EPCOT Center park was placed. It would be known as E.P.C.O.T. – the Experimental Prototype Community of Tomorrow. It was to be an ever-changing laboratory where the greatest minds could come together and solve the problems of the world as well as a community of nations that would serve as a showcase of harmony and goodwill. However, there were many downsides to this plan – for example, no one could retire, the behavior of teenagers would be heavily monitored, and living in general would take a backseat to showcasing the latest technologies. Some feared that it would turn into something out of a dystopian nightmare! Needless to say, when Walt died, the plans for E.P.C.O.T. were instantly put on the kibosh. While Walt’s visualized “Progress City” was never built, a spectacular scale model was, and still is, presented to guests as the post-show of Walt Disney’s Carousel of Progress at the Magic Kingdom.

In the late 1970s, then-CEO Card Walker wanted to revisit the E.P.C.O.T. idea. Still, the executives were wary and agreed that Walt’s vision for E.P.C.O.T. would not work in its initial design. Thus, a compromise was reached: The concept for E.P.C.O.T. would be turned into a theme park called “EPCOT Center”, so named because they believed that if the park was a success, they could potentially build Walt’s city of the future around it – thus, being the “Center” of EPCOT.


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“To all who come to this place of joy, hope and friendship, welcome. EPCOT is inspired by Walt Disney’s creative vision. Here, human achievements are celebrated through imagination, wonders of enterprise and concepts of a future that promises new and exciting benefits for all. May EPCOT Center entertain, inform and inspire and above all, may it instill a new sense of belief and pride in man’s ability to shape a world that offers hope to people everywhere.”
— E. Cardon Walker, October 24, 1982


EPCOT is arguably the biggest and most lasting mark of the entire resort, an incredible celebration of our cultural diversity, humanity, future, and history. EPCOT, which opened on October 1, 1982, tells the story of Earth’s greatest resource - its people. People from the past, present and future, and across the globe, are showcased in this tribute to our beloved planet and mankind’s achievements.

The park is made up of four distinct areas, each highlighting a different aspect of human experience, and altogether, the park boasts 31 pavilions. The magnificent Spaceship Earth marks the entrance to World Celebration, highlighting the spirit of innovation and the power of the human mind. World Celebration is the center of operations for all of EPCOT. Beyond Spaceship Earth, a pavilion devoted to the history of human communication, lush gardens lead towards Horizons, a pavilion devoted to showcasing the possibilities of human life in the future; the Celebration Center, the main headquarters of EPCOT’s yearly celebrations and festivals; and Journey Into Imagination, dedicated to the limitless power of imagination.

To the left of World Celebration is World Discovery, highlighting the sciences and technological advancement through four pavilions: Energy in Motion, focusing on applications of energy through kinetics and motion physics; Wonders of Life, focusing on health and the human body; Mission: SPACE, focusing on astronomy and the fascination with what lies beyond our humble blue planet; and Test Track, focusing on transportation by way of how cars are designed and tested.

To the right of World Celebration is World Nature, highlighting the natural wonders of our world, in accordance with the “land, sea and sky” triptych. Like with World Celebration and World Discovery, World Nature features four pavilions: The Land, focusing on ecology and humanity’s relationship with our planet; The Living Seas, focusing on marine life and what we can do to preserve our waterways; Journey of Water, an outdoor pavilion focusing on the water cycle; and The World Above, focusing on aviation and weather.

When EPCOT first opened, these three districts were united as one, under the name “Future World”, which was later named “Discovery World” as a result of Project Gemini, a complete park renovation that transformed the park for the new millennium. Nearly 40 years later, it was decided to split Discovery World up into three distinct neighborhoods, each with four pavilions to it.

Beyond these three districts, the path leads towards World Showcase, celebrating the many diverse cultures of our planet. When EPCOT opened, World Showcase represented nine nations: Mexico, China, Germany, Italy, the United States of America, Japan, France, the United Kingdom and Canada. These nine have since been joined by ten other nations: Morocco, Jamaica, Norway, Tanzania, Brazil, Jordan, India, South Africa, Thailand and Colombia.

Through this park, we are able to see humanity at its best, and we are given new hope for the future.


~ ~ ~ ~ ~

I'm sure that if you were to go over the pavilions of EPCOT, you'd notice two pavilions that may seem familiar to those who follow the various Imagineering games held here on the forums. Yes, this Mirror EPCOT will feature Energy in Motion, as created for Season 3 of One Little Spark by the Imagination Institute Interns, and The World Above, as created for Season 7 of The Sorcerer's Apprentice by Team Space. And I will be sure to credit all those who brough these pavilions to life when I discuss them in more detail later on.

Now, since I uploaded this particular post a day early, that means the next post won't be coming out until Monday. So stay tuned, because on Monday, we'll be going over the history of Walt Disney World's third theme park!

I wanna see your Roger Rabbit's Runaway Trolley ridethrough so badly.
 

Suchomimus

Well-Known Member
When EPCOT first opened, these three districts were united as one, under the name “Future World”, which was later named “Discovery World” as a result of Project Gemini, a complete park renovation that transformed the park for the new millennium. Nearly 40 years later, it was decided to split Discovery World up into three distinct neighborhoods, each with four pavilions to it.
I see the reasoning to evolve Future/Discovery World into three “neighborhoods”, though I admittedly don’t understand why F/D.W. couldn’t stay on as the name of that half of the park. I see it working the same way with WestCOT’s iteration World Showcase with its four “neighborhoods”.
 
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DisneyManOne

Well-Known Member
Original Poster
I can’t wait to see what you’re going to include in this version even if possible Avengers Campus depending if Universal doesn’t have the theme park rights to Marvel, and 20th Century Studios with The Simpsons along with the 100 anniversary of Disney.
I made mention of this in my last Mirror WDW thread, but in this Mirror universe, Disney does not buy out 20th Century Fox. It remains its own separate film company. As for the Avengers...well, I have a very specific plan for them.

Great to see Mirror WDW again, it’s one of my favorite projects on this forum. I wonder where you put Star Wars in Magic Kingdom, is it near Frontierland?
Basically. It's in the same place it would be at Disneyland. In essence, Mirror Magic Kingdom 3.0's layout is similar to the pre-Disney-Universal Studios Mirror Disneyland @MANEATINGWREATH devised, with both Galaxy's Edge and Hollywoodland beyond the railroad track.

I wanna see your Roger Rabbit's Runaway Trolley ridethrough so badly.
I've said this many, many times, but @MANEATINGWREATH is the mind behind Roger Rabbit's Runaway Trolley, as it was he who devised for his first Mirror Disneyland in 2019, and I have merely worked it into Mirror Walt Disney World (quite fitting, actually, as Walt Disney World has plenty of clones from its Californian counterpart); so if you want to see a ride-through, it all depends on if the man ever returns to the forums to complete Mirror Disneyland. I'm sure he'd do a ride-through there, as I am also sure that it will be part of his Disney-Universal Studios concept.

Likewise, I've also said many, many times that I am not at all familiar with Who Framed Roger Rabbit beyond a basic understanding of the plot, so I really have nothing to go off on to devise my own ride-through.
 

DisneyManOne

Well-Known Member
Original Poster
For this next part of our introduction, I borrowed a few portions from @MANEATINGWREATH's introduction to WestCOT from his recent Mirror Disneyland project; and likewise, much of the "history of EPCOT" portion of the EPCOT post was from the WestCOT introduction, as well, so credit to him on that. I forgot to acknowledge that in the last post, hence why I'm doing it now.

Also, this excellent article from Disney at Work, and the MickeyWiki served as a huge inspiration for this portion, as it really went into detail about what will be discussed here.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Circle of Life Continues

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As the 1980s wore on, Disney saw a great shake-up. The 1970s were tumultuous years for Walt Disney Productions. Following Walt’s death in 1966, the “Mouse House” faced numerous challenges. Walt Disney was infamously a CEO whose executive branch was mainly comprised of yes-men; and with their boss gone, creative decisions that happened at Disney mainly revolved around one question: “What would Walt have done?” Yes, from 1966 to 1984, that one question served as sole guidance for most of what Disney contributed to the world of entertainment, and as those years wore on, those contributions were not churning out strong profits. For the most part, the company’s live-action film output mainly comprised of outrageous, zany, slapstick-filled comedies – a favorite style of Walt’s – and as time went on, they were not bringing in much at the box office. The animation department was suffering under the constraints of budget cuts and creative differences; which not only led to Don Bluth leading an infamous exodus, but also led to the failure of The Black Cauldron, the film that nearly ended the production of Disney animated films as a whole. Even at the theme parks, there was trouble. Upon its opening, EPCOT Center was not bringing in projected attendance and was widely considered a boring flop. What is more, during this time, there was more than one hostile takeover attempt. It was clear that Disney was in some major trouble.

But as the decade ended, Disney finally got their act together and emerged stronger than ever with friendly investors and a new management team: CEO Michael Eisner, Chairman Jeffrey Katzenberg and President Frank Wells, installed in 1984, naught but two years after the opening of EPCOT Center. In this same time, the Disney Parks faced a period of ambitious design and development. In addition to the Magic Kingdom and EPCOT Center, the company’s first international destination, Tokyo Disneyland, opened on April 15, 1983. Tokyo Disneyland would prove to be a major milestone for the company, laying the groundwork for an international expansion that would later continue into France and twice in China. It proved to Disney Management, including Michael Eisner, that there was a considerable audience (and appetite) for the Disney name.

Eisner, Katzenberg and Wells began a revitalization of the Disney name, and what followed the opening of Disney-Universal Studios at the Disneyland Resort in 1990 – a park experiment even more audacious than EPCOT, combining the Imagineering forces of Disney with the innovative film creativity of Universal, whose original Studio Tour helped shape the park’s focus on the “behind-the-scenes”, as well as the idea of “riding the movies” – would become the most ambitious project Imagineering had ever conceived: The Disney Decade. The ambitious project would broaden the Disney family of theme parks and hotels internationally and stateside, with such projects as Disneyland Paris and WestCOT coming to light. And naturally, it was also announced that Walt Disney World would be receiving a third park, as well. But what would that park be? Eisner did confirm that a new park was in development in 1990, but he refused to give any information as to what that park would entail.


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In 1989, in the wake of Disney-Universal Studios’ finishing development, Eisner challenged the Imagineers to come up with a unique concept for Walt Disney World’s third gate. Although the Imagineers came up with many concepts, the one that attracted Eisner’s attention the most was that of a park centered around animals. Hiring an Imagineer named Joe Rohde to lead the project, what followed was, perhaps, the most ambitious project in Walt Disney World history.

With the aid of Rick Barongi, a former official at the San Diego Zoo, Rohde and his team of Imagineers – six of them, in fact: Zofia Kostyrko, Tony Marando, Patsy Tillisch, Christopher West, and two men both named Kevin Brown – set out to create a new way people looked at zoos, blending the dense, immersive theming of a Disney theme park experience with the natural wonder of our planet’s flora and fauna. In 1990, the team took the first of six research trips to Africa, to get a sense of what they wanted to see in the park. In 1995, Rohde and Barongi would set up an advisory board to get further insight on how to look after the animals featured in the park; a decision spurred on by the failure that was Disney’s America, a project that practically went charging in without much input from legit experts and historians. It would prove to be a smart decision, as the animal experts would help make the park stronger.


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The same year, on June 21, the park’s theme and name were finally announced to the world. The park would be known as Disney’s Animal Kingdom, and would not just show guests unique animals, but bring them into their world. Guests would feel as if they were on a legitimate African wildlife reserve, or trekking through the Asian jungles. They would even get a glimpse of what animals were, and what animals could have been.

This dedication to detail was heavily looked upon. In order to create the most realistic animal exhibits possible, it was decided to plant all the plants in the park for two growing seasons before they brought the animals in – a feat completed in the spring of 1996, and the animals were brought in the following fall. And beyond construction, Disney was hiring zookeepers and managers for the new park, with Barongi’s aid, left and right.

After nearly a decade in development, and after three years of construction, Disney’s Animal Kingdom opened on – fittingly enough – Earth Day, April 22, 1998. Said Eisner of Animal Kingdom’s opening: “Whatever doubts we may once have had about the Animal Kingdom’s viability were answered on April 22, 1998, the day the park opened. The crowds were so large that we were forced to close our gates to further guests by 9:00 a.m. Over the next few months, attendance has exceeded every expectation, and the ratings from guests are the highest we’ve received for any park in our history. In a way, the Animal Kingdom takes us full circle. Thirty years ago, all you could find on our Orlando property were vast herds of grazing animals and some rather intimidating reptiles. Today, after billions of dollars in investment, we have unveiled our most original theme park concept yet: vast herds of grazing animals and some rather intimidating reptiles.”


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“Welcome to a kingdom of animals... real, ancient, and imagined: a kingdom ruled by lions, dinosaurs, and dragons; a kingdom of balance, harmony, and survival; a kingdom we enter to share in the wonder, gaze at the beauty, thrill at the drama, and learn.”
— Michael D. Eisner, April 22, 1998


From The Oasis and Safari Village (later renamed Discovery Island), paths lead towards four different areas. To the southwest, Beastly Kingdom, a land devoted to the animals of myth, as well as the animals of Europe. To the northwest, the rolling plains of Africa, with train access to the dazzling rainforests of South America. To the northeast, the dense jungles of Asia. And to the southeast, Dinoland, U.S.A., a land devoted to the prehistoric beasts of yore, themed around an archaeological dig site. Later expansions would bring guests into the majestic Outback of Australia and into the verdant forests of North America.

With all that said, it’s clear that Disney’s Animal Kingdom is filled with adventure just waiting to be discovered.


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Suchomimus

Well-Known Member
Eisner, Katzenberg and Wells began a revitalization of the Disney name, and what followed the opening of Disney-Universal Studios at the Disneyland Resort in 1990 – a park experiment even more audacious than EPCOT, combining the Imagineering forces of Disney with the innovative film creativity of Universal, whose original Studio Tour helped shape the park’s focus on the “behind-the-scenes”, as well as the idea of “riding the movies”
If you’re not going to have Disney absorb 20th Century in this Mirror Universe, then what about the merger with Universal here?
 

DisneyManOne

Well-Known Member
Original Poster
If you’re not going to have Disney absorb 20th Century in this Mirror Universe, then what about the merger with Universal here?
Like with my old Mirror Walt Disney World-A concept, this takes place within the same Mirror universe as MEW's Mirror Disneyland 2021 - Final Draft, which features Disney-Universal Studios opening as the second park of the Disneyland Resort. There, Disney-Universal Studios was not the result of a merger. It was basically the equivalent to our real-life Disney-MGM Studios, a partnership between two independent film companies.

In fact, here's what MEW had to say about it:

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Sid Sheinberg, President and CEO of MCA, had overseen three of Universal’s highest-grossing films: Jaws, E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial, and Back to the Future, a result of his ongoing partnership with director Steven Spielberg. Their success had only enticed Sheinberg to revitalize plans for a Florida theme park, or perhaps reopen the Hollywood property with a fresh look. Eisner, overhearing rumors of MCA’s intentions, approached Sheinberg in February of 1985 with a unique, if not bold idea. Although it was at first a bit off-putting to Sheinberg, the opportunities that might follow would prove endless. So, in March of that same year, Eisner, Wells, Sheinberg, and filmmakers George Lucas and Steven Spielberg vacationed in secret for two weeks in Colorado.

By December 1985, an agreement was made and an announcement followed: Disney and Universal would collaborate and create Disney-Universal Studios in Anaheim, California.

The agreement was unprecedented. Disney and Universal would share the worldwide rights to use one another’s name, including their logo and brand in association with the new theme park. Whereas Disney owned 100% of the Anaheim site chosen for the theme park, both companies would share the ticket sales, 40% to Disney and 60% to Universal. Disney would receive 100% of all merchandising profits from the park, while Universal would receive 100% from concession sales. Likewise, the construction fees and ongoing, year-round maintenance of the park would be split 50% to Universal and 50% to Disney. By contractual agreement, MCA-Universal would not be allowed to build another Universal Studios theme park until 2000, and likewise, Disney would be unable to build another Studios-themed park of their own until 2000. Steven Spielberg and George Lucas were hired on to lead WED Enterprises in the incredible design process ahead.

One final arrangement: No Universal characters would appear outside the Studio Park. Woody Woodpecker, Count Dracula and Lucille Ball would never appear within Disneyland Park, nor in any Disney offerings outside the Park. As such, Mickey Mouse and Goofy would never appear in any future Universal Park outside the Anaheim location.

By January 1987, construction had begun on a site not far from Disneyland Park on Disney's Anaheim property, and on June 7, 1990, Disney-Universal Studios opened to an excited public.


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“The World you have entered was created by The Walt Disney Company and MCA-Universal, and is dedicated to Hollywood—not a place on a map, but a state of mind that exists wherever people dream and wonder and imagine, a place where illusion and reality are fused by technological magic. We welcome you to a Hollywood that never was—and always will be.”
- Michael Eisner, June 7, 1990


Like Disneyland before it, the design of Disney-Universal Studios was unprecedented. Rather than competing, the distinctly themed areas would compliment each other and contribute to the total Guest Experience. The audience here does not simply sit before a motion-picture screen. They are to physically experience an adventure, seldom as spectators, but almost always as “participants” in the drama. Here they can “Ride the Movies.” Scene One is Hollywood Boulevard, "The Hollywood 'That Never Was' - or Could Be.

The Studios Park opened exclusively with four “lands”: Hollywood Boulevard - Manhattan Waterfront - Toontown - Production Backlot. The biggest draw was the “Studio Tour” which consumed much of the 180-acre site. The real Universal backlot, which never closed to film productions, remained in Hollywood, often the birthplace of future thematic additions to the Studio Tour.


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With a gala fit for Hollywood, Disney-Universal Studios opened to tremendous success and rave reviews. The signature Studio Tour anchored a number of satellite production facilities for films and television shows, a small backlot, and an animation studio used by both Walt Disney Feature Animation and Spielberg’s Amblimation. Though by 1995, contractual disagreements and conflicts of interest would shutter the production facilities and satellite studios altogether.

The Park was a victim of its own success. Parking lots were full by 11:00 AM and the 6:00 PM closing was extended to midnight. Tickets sold out weeks in advance, with the Park’s signature Great Movie Ride and Studio Tour garnering wait times of over six hours! As the years went by, the Park’s design and mission statement evolved. Like Disneyland, the Park would only climb to greater heights, eventually downsizing the Studio Tour and “studio-like” attractions altogether for further flights of fantasy, as well as new “lands,” including:


Jurassic Park
“Time, the Ever-Flowing River. Come with Us Now, to the Time Before Man, when the River Flowed through a Newborn World, and Giants Walked the Earth. Welcome to Jurassic Park!”

Star Wars: Galaxy's Edge
"The Crossroads of a Galaxy Far, Far Away: The Planet of Batuu. The Past, Present and Future of this Fantastical Realm Coexist Among the Soaring Spacecraft and Alien Creatures of this Thriving Spaceport. Galaxy's Edge Celebrates the Magic and Mystery of George Lucas's 'Star Wars'; Here Imagination Gives Birth to Adventure."

The Wizarding World of Harry Potter: Hogsmeade & Diagon Alley
“Only Here Can You Ride a Dragon, Sample a Butterbeer, and Experience All the Magic and Adventure of the ‘Harry Potter’ Films and Books. The Wizarding World of Harry Potter Envelops You in Wondrous Surprises and Takes You on an Extraordinary Adventure with Harry and His Friends.”

And that’s not forgetting an additional three lands built in the years following.

- Springfield, U.S.A.
-
Super Nintendo World
- Avengers Campus


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Today, Disney-Universal Studios remains an unusual, but much beloved remnant of the Eisner and Sheinberg era - the unique Park that brought expansion to Disneyland and turned it into the multi-day Disneyland Resort - the Park that brought Universal back into the themed entertainment market, a feat the studio would not replicate until May 2005, when Universal Studios Orlando finally opened, not ironically in direct competition to Walt Disney World.

Even still, the agreement between Disney and Universal remains, a strong connection that has made the “Happiest Place on Earth” a “whole lot happier.” The first 30 years of Disney-Universal Studios have been a landmark in family entertainment and fun, and one that can only continue to grow and evolve at the Disneyland Resort.
 

DisneyManOne

Well-Known Member
Original Poster
In a Mirror Walt Disney World without Port Disney, the question must be asked: What will MWDW's fourth park be? Well, let's find out, shall we?

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Charting New Courses

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Beyond the development and construction of Disney’s Animal Kingdom, there were more new developments being planned all throughout the resort. Walt Disney World Village received a new neighbor, Pleasure Island, and both were later combined into Downtown Disney alongside a new area, the West Side; two new water parks were built: Typhoon Lagoon and Blizzard Beach; and dozens of new hotels were springing up. However, in the wake of Animal Kingdom’s grand opening, the expansion boom wore off. It seemed as though there was nowhere else to expand. Once the new millennium came, the two most notable non-park additions were two more resorts: Disney’s Animal Kingdom Lodge and the DVC-exclusive Disney’s Saratoga Springs Resort & Spa, which opened in the space formerly held by the Disney Institute; and likewise, beyond the multiple new additions to the theme parks, the only major update was the rebranding of Downtown Disney to Disney Springs in 2015.

Then again, given the boom, it was highly understandable to see why Disney left the American parks alone for a while. Both Disneyland and Walt Disney World had three parks under their belt and a vast wealth of other unique experiences to guarantee a week-long stay. Therefore, for most of the new millennium, the new park openings were all international. In 2001, Tokyo DisneySea opened, followed by Disney Studios Paris in 2002, Hong Kong Disneyland in 2005, Hong Kong DisneySea in 2015 and Shanghai Disneyland just one year later. However, as Walt Disney World drew closer and closer to its 50th anniversary, it was decided to mark the occasion in one big way.

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(Needless to say, in this Mirror universe, Hotel Plaza Boulevard does not get built here. But I had to use this picture in order to help my readers get a sense of what parcel of land I’ll be referring to.)

In the wake of the roaring success that was the Lake Buena Vista Shopping Village, Disney started setting aside the land west of the Village, and even buying new land nearby, to create another park. If the Shopping Village could draw such big crowds over towards the eastern side of Walt Disney World, just imagine what a whole theme park could do! A monorail extension was even being built to take guests directly to the Village, so it could pull double-duty as a station for both the Village and the new park!

However, the ideas for what this “Eastern Park Concept” would entail would never make it past development, as work soon began on EPCOT Center, which, by that time, had fully transformed from a city of the future to the World’s Fair we know and love today. And of course, further complicating things was the subsequent decision to build Disney’s Animal Kingdom on the western side of the resort. As time wore on, and the 2000s came and went, it was rumored that Disney had ultimately given up on the “Eastern Park Concept.” With three massive, elaborate parks to spare, making a fourth just seemed redundant.

But when the time came to prepare for Walt Disney World’s 50th anniversary, Disney decided to, at long last, return to the “Eastern Park Concept.” Plans for the development were made known in early 2015, but it wouldn’t be until the D23 Expo later that August when Disney Parks Chairman – and future CEO – Tom Staggs announced that Walt Disney World was, at long last, going to get a fourth theme park! The park would be called Disney’s Mythica, and be focused around the ancient myths and legends of world history.

Blog%2B-%2BWDW%2BMythica%2Bpt%2B3.png




“To all who come seeking adventure, welcome. Disney’s Mythica imbues all who enter with a spirit of curiosity and excitement. Here, all are invited to set a path for mysterious and exciting places; lands of adventure, intrigue and romance. Disney’s Mythica is dedicated to all those who yearn to venture outside their comfort zone, and explore the vast history and mythology of our planet Earth. May your adventures here be adventures worth remembering for years to come.”
— Thomas O. Staggs, May 1, 2021


On May 1, 2021, five months prior to the big event, Disney’s Mythica became Walt Disney World’s fourth theme park. Disney’s Mythica is the place where the legends and mythology of our world comes to life before our very eyes. Great research has been endeavored to make sure everything is letter-accurate. If the Magic Kingdom represents “the World of Fantasy”, EPCOT represents “the World of Discovery” and Disney’s Animal Kingdom represents “the World of Zoology”, then Disney’s Mythica represents “the World of Mythology.”

Guests to Disney’s Mythica enter through Anglia, highlighting the legends of Victorian and Medieval England. Helios transports guests to Ancient Greece, the age of gods and heroes. The mysterious and mythical Aegyptus brings the wonder of Ancient Egypt to life. In Valhalla, the thrills and figures of Norse mythology bring a sense of heroism to the park. Tianxi brings to life Ancient China, and its legends of dragons and the Monkey King. And Atua highlights Māori mythology, where gods and demigods alike bring prosperity (which sits on the land currently occupied by the Oxbridge section of Anglia). As the park went through its first five years, it gained two new lands: The spirit of adventure lives on in Atlantis, set around the long-fabled “lost city.” And Inti transports guests to the Inca Empire, home of many mysteries. These disparate epochs are united by a replica of the Pharos Lighthouse, serving as the park’s central icon and the epitome of Mythica’s artistry.

(Of course, Mythica was the idea of S.W. Wilson of Ideal Buildout fame, and I thought it was too good not to bring to Mirror Walt Disney World. The opening date reflects the date S.W. Wilson first posted the map.)

disney-world-50th-anniversary-concept-art.jpg.webp

As it stands today, Walt Disney World includes four theme parks, three water parks, an entertainment district, an island-based recreation area, seven golf courses, two miniature golf courses, all sorts of other sports and recreation options, and eighteen resort hotels. It’s not for nothing that this place has become one of the most popular tourist destinations of all time! Today, Walt Disney World continues the legacy of Walt’s dream, bringing joy and laughter into the hearts of those who wish to unlock its magic. Here we find acres upon acres of vacation paradise, where endless enjoyment, fascination, illumination and a lifetime of happy memories are less than a dream away.


~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Well, there we have it: the history of Mirror Walt Disney World 3.0's four theme parks! Starting in the next post, which should be coming out at some point tomorrow, we'll finally be discussing the amenities of the resort, starting with its northern hub.

Also, I would like to note that I included a line from @D Hulk's DisneySky dedication into my Mythica dedication, as a nod to his park, so credit on that count goes to him!
 

Disney Warrior

Well-Known Member
In a Mirror Walt Disney World without Port Disney, the question must be asked: What will MWDW's fourth park be? Well, let's find out, shall we?

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Charting New Courses

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Beyond the development and construction of Disney’s Animal Kingdom, there were more new developments being planned all throughout the resort. Walt Disney World Village received a new neighbor, Pleasure Island, and both were later combined into Downtown Disney alongside a new area, the West Side; two new water parks were built: Typhoon Lagoon and Blizzard Beach; and dozens of new hotels were springing up. However, in the wake of Animal Kingdom’s grand opening, the expansion boom wore off. It seemed as though there was nowhere else to expand. Once the new millennium came, the two most notable non-park additions were two more resorts: Disney’s Animal Kingdom Lodge and the DVC-exclusive Disney’s Saratoga Springs Resort & Spa, which opened in the space formerly held by the Disney Institute; and likewise, beyond the multiple new additions to the theme parks, the only major update was the rebranding of Downtown Disney to Disney Springs in 2015.

Then again, given the boom, it was highly understandable to see why Disney left the American parks alone for a while. Both Disneyland and Walt Disney World had three parks under their belt and a vast wealth of other unique experiences to guarantee a week-long stay. Therefore, for most of the new millennium, the new park openings were all international. In 2001, Tokyo DisneySea opened, followed by Disney Studios Paris in 2002, Hong Kong Disneyland in 2005, Hong Kong DisneySea in 2015 and Shanghai Disneyland just one year later. However, as Walt Disney World drew closer and closer to its 50th anniversary, it was decided to mark the occasion in one big way.


Hotel-Plaza-Map.jpg


(Needless to say, in this Mirror universe, Hotel Plaza Boulevard does not get built here. But I had to use this picture in order to help my readers get a sense of what parcel of land I’ll be referring to.)

In the wake of the roaring success that was the Lake Buena Vista Shopping Village, Disney started setting aside the land west of the Village, and even buying new land nearby, to create another park. If the Shopping Village could draw such big crowds over towards the eastern side of Walt Disney World, just imagine what a whole theme park could do! A monorail extension was even being built to take guests directly to the Village, so it could pull double-duty as a station for both the Village and the new park!

However, the ideas for what this “Eastern Park Concept” would entail would never make it past development, as work soon began on EPCOT Center, which, by that time, had fully transformed from a city of the future to the World’s Fair we know and love today. And of course, further complicating things was the subsequent decision to build Disney’s Animal Kingdom on the western side of the resort. As time wore on, and the 2000s came and went, it was rumored that Disney had ultimately given up on the “Eastern Park Concept.” With three massive, elaborate parks to spare, making a fourth just seemed redundant.

But when the time came to prepare for Walt Disney World’s 50th anniversary, Disney decided to, at long last, return to the “Eastern Park Concept.” Plans for the development were made known in early 2015, but it wouldn’t be until the D23 Expo later that August when Disney Parks Chairman – and future CEO – Tom Staggs announced that Walt Disney World was, at long last, going to get a fourth theme park! The park would be called Disney’s Mythica, and be focused around the ancient myths and legends of world history.


Blog%2B-%2BWDW%2BMythica%2Bpt%2B3.png




“To all who come seeking adventure, welcome. Disney’s Mythica imbues all who enter with a spirit of curiosity and excitement. Here, all are invited to set a path for mysterious and exciting places; lands of adventure, intrigue and romance. Disney’s Mythica is dedicated to all those who yearn to venture outside their comfort zone, and explore the vast history and mythology of our planet Earth. May your adventures here be adventures worth remembering for years to come.”
— Thomas O. Staggs, May 1, 2021


On May 1, 2021, five months prior to the big event, Disney’s Mythica became Walt Disney World’s fourth theme park. Disney’s Mythica is the place where the legends and mythology of our world comes to life before our very eyes. Great research has been endeavored to make sure everything is letter-accurate. If the Magic Kingdom represents “the World of Fantasy”, EPCOT represents “the World of Discovery” and Disney’s Animal Kingdom represents “the World of Zoology”, then Disney’s Mythica represents “the World of Mythology.”

Guests to Disney’s Mythica enter through Anglia, highlighting the legends of Victorian and Medieval England. Helios transports guests to Ancient Greece, the age of gods and heroes. The mysterious and mythical Aegyptus brings the wonder of Ancient Egypt to life. In Valhalla, the thrills and figures of Norse mythology bring a sense of heroism to the park. Tianxi brings to life Ancient China, and its legends of dragons and the Monkey King. And Atua highlights Māori mythology, where gods and demigods alike bring prosperity (which sits on the land currently occupied by the Oxbridge section of Anglia). As the park went through its first five years, it gained two new lands: The spirit of adventure lives on in Atlantis, set around the long-fabled “lost city.” And Inti transports guests to the Inca Empire, home of many mysteries. These disparate epochs are united by a replica of the Pharos Lighthouse, serving as the park’s central icon and the epitome of Mythica’s artistry.

(Of course, Mythica was the idea of S.W. Wilson of Ideal Buildout fame, and I thought it was too good not to bring to Mirror Walt Disney World. The opening date reflects the date S.W. Wilson first posted the map.)


disney-world-50th-anniversary-concept-art.jpg.webp

As it stands today, Walt Disney World includes four theme parks, three water parks, an entertainment district, an island-based recreation area, seven golf courses, two miniature golf courses, all sorts of other sports and recreation options, and eighteen resort hotels. It’s not for nothing that this place has become one of the most popular tourist destinations of all time! Today, Walt Disney World continues the legacy of Walt’s dream, bringing joy and laughter into the hearts of those who wish to unlock its magic. Here we find acres upon acres of vacation paradise, where endless enjoyment, fascination, illumination and a lifetime of happy memories are less than a dream away.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Well, there we have it: the history of Mirror Walt Disney World 3.0's four theme parks! Starting in the next post, which should be coming out at some point tomorrow, we'll finally be discussing the amenities of the resort, starting with its northern hub.

Also, I would like to note that I included a line from @D Hulk's DisneySky dedication into my Mythica dedication, as a nod to his park, so credit on that count goes to him!

Interesting using Mythica (one of SW Wilson’s best original park creations that isn’t an Animal Kingdom or DisneySea) as the fourth gate instead of Port Disney. Of course, it will take a while, but I’m excited for that. What gets built in Hollywood Studios’ plot of land in this version?
 

DisneyManOne

Well-Known Member
Original Poster
Interesting using Mythica (one of SW Wilson’s best original park creations that isn’t an Animal Kingdom or DisneySea) as the fourth gate instead of Port Disney. Of course, it will take a while, but I’m excited for that. What gets built in Hollywood Studios’ plot of land in this version?
I have a specific plan for that parcel of land. You'll find out about that later.

I know you said that Disney doesn’t acquire 20th Century Fox, but with World of Mythology would that include the Percy Jackson series?
Nope. Not at all familiar with Percy Jackson, so Helios will mainly focus on an original-to-Mythica depiction of the Greek gods; although Disney's Hercules will be given a few cursory glances.
 

DisneyManOne

Well-Known Member
Original Poster
~ ~ ~ ~ ~
The date is October 1, 2026. This date is remarkable, for today marks the 55th Anniversary of Walt Disney World. Our time in The Most Magical Place on Earth” could begin in one of two places. There are two separate hubs where guests can start their day’s journey from – one for the north and one for the south, but the most prominent hub among the two is the northern one. If you head north, you’ll find that any day at Walt Disney World begins amidst the color and excitement of…

Disney Square

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Formerly known as the Transportation and Ticket Center, Disney Square – as it became on October 1, 1996 – is an accessible, spectacular port of transportation and travel. The air is filled with wonderful atmospheric music of the Disney canon. Lush gardens, fountains and trees set an inspired threshold to the exciting worlds of make-believe that lie just beyond its borders. Here in this square, beauty is the thing that is stressed the most. Almost every remnant of the original, outdated Transportation and Ticket Center has been demolished; the sole survivors being the Monorail Station, the Ferryboat Landing, and the Parking Center.

os-magic-kingdom-parking-lot-20150616

The Parking Center offers parking for guests eager to spend a day at the Magic Kingdom. It’s divided into two distinct lots: the Mickey & Friends Lot and the Seven Dwarfs Lot. Each lot has eight sections to it. The Mickey & Friends Lot has sections named after Mickey, Minnie, Donald, Daisy, Goofy, Pluto, Chip ‘n’ Dale and Huey, Dewey & Louie; and the Seven Dwarfs Lot has, of course, Doc, Grumpy, Happy, Sleepy, Bashful, Sneezy, Dopey and Snow White. Altogether, the Parking Center can host up to 15,000 cars! (The Walt Disney World Speedway does not open here in MWDW, so – as it is currently happening in real life – the space becomes more parking spaces.)

Now, there are two methods of getting to Disney Square from here. We can either walk from the parking lot (if we were lucky enough to park close enough to the entrance), or we could take an electric Tram, the latest in green transportation methods. They make stops at every section of the two parking lots. As we approach Disney Square, we can see those electric Trams drop guests off at the entrance to the area. First stop in Disney Square: the Gateway.


enhance

The original ticket booths have been demolished in favor of a new Victorian style, similar to the ticket booths found at Disneyland’s Main Gate. The main entrance to the Gateway is marked by a large Victorian portico, similar to what is seen in the picture above. A circular frame hangs in the center of the portico, bearing the Walt Disney World logo on a field of royal blue with golden embellishments. Above the logo is a “magic window.” Similar to what was set up on Cinderella Castle for Disneyland’s 50th anniversary – in fact, both were set up in 2005 – the magic window changes images every 60 seconds. The images are, of course, the emblems of Walt Disney World’s first three theme parks – Cinderella Castle, Spaceship Earth and the Tree of Life – all designed as if they were stained glass. This changing is accomplished via three-sided rotating panels.

The Gateway is where one can purchase tickets or Annual Passes. There’s even a special will call booth for those who purchased reserved tickets. In fact, here is a brief list showcasing some of the basic ticket prices that are used here in this Mirror Walt Disney World. Here, tickets are much cheaper – about the same price as they were around the early 2000s, particularly around 2000-2005, the year the Magic Your Way ticket was introduced. This way, more people can get the chance to visit this place without feeling like they’re being priced out (a common criticism regarding how our real-life WDW is run nowadays).


Basic 1-Day Theme Park Ticket (for guests just visiting for one day only; i.e. Florida locals taking day trips and such like): $50.00 for adults; $35.00 for children
Weekday Select Pass*: $100.00 for adults; $70.00 for children
Theme Park Select Pass**: $200.00 for adults; $155.00 for children

Basic 1-Day Water Park Ticket: $35.00 for adults; $29.00 for children
Water Park Annual Pass: $139.00 for adults; $98.00 for children
Basic 1-Day Athel Island Ticket: $30.00 for adults; $15.00 for children
Pleasure Island/Lights District Multi-Club Ticket: $20.95 for adults; $16.95 for children
Pleasure Island/Lights District Single Club Ticket: $10.00 for adults; $5.00 for children
Pleasure Island/Lights District Annual Pass: $99.00

* Allows Florida residents access to the four theme parks from Mondays to Fridays. Also includes free parking, park-hopping and up to 20% off select dining and merchandise. Blockout dates do apply.
** Allows Florida residents access to the four theme parks for 325 days out of the year. Also includes free parking and up to 20% off select dining and merchandise. Blockout dates do apply.


Magic Your Way Tickets:
Magic Your Way Base Ticket:
1-Day: $55.00 for adults; $49.00 for children
2-Day: $119.00 for adults; $96.00 for children
3-Day: $171.00 for adults; $137.00 for children
4-Day: $185.00 for adults; $148.00 for children
5-Day: $193.00 for adults; $155.00 for children
6-Day: $196.00 for adults; $157.00 for children
7-Day: $199.00 for adults; $160.00 for children
8-Day: $202.00 for adults; $162.00 for children
9-Day: $205.00 for adults; $164.00 for children
10-Day: $208.00 for adults; $167.00 for children
Park Hopper Add-On*: $35.00
Water Park Fun and More** Add-On: $45.00
No Expiration:
On 2-Day and 3-Day Tickets: $10.00
On 4-Day Ticket: $15.00
On 5-Day Ticket: $35.00
On 6-Day Ticket: $45.00
On 7-Day Ticket: $55.00
On 8-Day, 9-Day and 10-Day Tickets: $100.00

* Allows guests to visit more than one park on a single day.
** Allows access to the three Disney Water Parks, Pleasure Island, the Lights District, Athel Island and the various golf and mini-golf courses found throughout the resort.


Annual Passes:
Bronze Pass (available for Florida residents only):
Offers:

  • Admission to all four theme parks with three blockout periods: spring break, summer and late December/January
  • Park-hopping
  • Up to 20% off select dining and merchandise
  • Free standard parking
Price: $350 for adults; $300 for children

Silver Pass (available for Florida residents and DVC members only):
Offers:

  • Admission to all four theme parks with only two blockout dates: spring break and late December/January
  • Park-hopping
  • Free PhotoPass downloads
  • Up to 20% off select dining and merchandise
  • Free standard parking
Price: $550 for adults; $500 for children

Gold Pass (available for everyone):
Offers:

  • Admission to all four theme parks with no blockout dates
  • Park-hopping
  • Free PhotoPass downloads
  • Up to 20% off select dining and merchandise
  • Free standard parking
Price: $750 for adults; $700 for children

Platinum Pass (available for everyone):
Offers:

  • Admission to all four theme parks, all three water parks, Athel Island, Pleasure Island, the Lights District and Disney’s Oak Trail Golf Course with no blockout dates
  • Park-hopping
  • Free PhotoPass downloads
  • Up to 20% off select dining and merchandise
  • Free standard parking
Price: $950 for adults; $900 for children

Likewise, the Gateway is also home to security screening areas. In 2020, a new screening system was put into action that checks bags by having guests walk through a contactless scanner*. If you come to the Magic Kingdom by car, or by public transport, this is where you will have your bags checked before you enter the park. If you stay at any resort that is connected to the parks by monorail, a checkpoint is set up before you reach that resort’s monorail station; and if you stay at a resort connected to the parks by PeopleMover, the checkpoint is near the Magic Kingdom’s PeopleMover station.

* I know this measure was installed in 2020 because of the pandemic, but in this Mirror universe, the COVID-19 pandemic does not occur, but the contactless system is installed nonetheless.

There are two entrances to the Gateway – one from the Parking Center, and one from the Transportation Station. Old-timey fans whir over guests’ heads, to help alleviate the hot Florida heat. Video screens over these checkpoint gates provide engaging songs from Disney films, showcase Disney trivia and games, and show previews for attractions throughout the resort. For as efficient as Disney security can be, these elements will help entertain guests in line.

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Once past the Gateway, the beauty of Disney Square really starts to kick in, and helps set the stage for what lies ahead. Selections from the expansive Disney songbook fill our ears, via an updated version of the music loop that played at the entrance to the Magic Kingdom from 1992 to 2005, which was added to the area in 2021.

For the most part, this is the same loop that used to be at the Magic Kingdom entrance from 1991 to 2005, but some songs have been swapped out to include new songs. I originally wanted to include 50 songs in the loop, but most CDs can only play 70 to 80 minutes worth of content, and most of the area music loops at Disney are an hour long, at least. * indicates a selection from an original motion picture soundtrack, or any other officially-released soundtrack; and ** indicates an original arrangement made for the loop. All other songs will have a link to the certain arrangement I have in mind.
  1. “When You Wish Upon a Star” – Leigh Harline and Ned Washington, Pinocchio
  2. “Mickey Mouse March” – Jimmie Dodd, The Mickey Mouse Club
  3. “The Tiki, Tiki, Tiki Room” – Richard M. Shermand and Robert B. Sherman, The Enchanted Tiki Room
  4. “One Little Spark” – Richard M. Sherman and Robert B. Sherman, Journey Into Imagination (from the 2001 EPCOT entrance loop)
  5. “Circle of Life” – Elton John and Tim Rice, The Lion King (from Disney’s Orchestra Collection)
  6. “Go the Distance” – Alan Menken and David Zippel, Hercules (from the WDW Today 2019-2021 loop, 52:38 – 55:45 in the video)
  7. “Under the Sea” – Alan Menken and Howard Ashman, The Little Mermaid
  8. “Winnie the Pooh” – Richard M. Sherman and Robert B. Sherman, The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh (also from Disney’s Orchestra Collection)
  9. “Heigh-Ho” – Frank Churchill and Larry Morey, Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs
  10. “You Can Fly! You Can Fly! You Can Fly!” – Sammy Fain and Sammy Cahn, Peter Pan
  11. “Yo Ho (A Pirate’s Life for Me)” – George Bruns and Xavier Atencio, Pirates of the Caribbean
  12. “Avengers Theme Suite” – Alan Silvestri, Avengers: Infinity War *
  13. “Colonel Hathi’s March” – Richard M. Sherman and Robert B. Sherman, The Jungle Book (Paris entrance loop; 29:09 – 30:26)
  14. “Nemo Egg” – Thomas Newman, Finding Nemo *
  15. “Define Dancing” – Thomas Newman, WALL-E *
  16. “Le Festin” – Michael Giacchino and Camille Dalmais, Ratatouille (WDW Today)
  17. “For the First Time in Forever” – Robert Lopez and Kristen Anderson-Lopez, Frozen (WDW Today; 38:16 – 41:57 in the video)
  18. “The Bare Necessities” – Terry Gilkyson, The Jungle Book **
  19. “The Ballad of Davy Crockett” – George Bruns and Thomas W. Blackburn, Davy Crockett
  20. “There’s a Great Big Beautiful Tomorrow” – Richard M. Sherman and Robert B. Sherman, Carousel of Progress (fades out at 2:50, before narration starts)
  21. “Theme from Zorro – George Bruns and Norman Foster (Paris entrance loop; 32:09 – 34:50)
  22. “Soarin’” – Jerry Goldsmith, Soarin’
  23. “How Far I’ll Go” – Lin-Manuel Miranda, Moana **
  24. “Main Title” – John Williams, Star Wars *
  25. “New Horizons” – George Wilkins, Horizons **
  26. “Golden Dream” – Robert Moline and Randy Wright, The American Adventure (from 2001 EPCOT entrance loop)
  27. “Married Life” – Michael Giacchino, Up (WDW Today; 47:57 – 49:50)
  28. “Almost There” (instrumental) – Randy Newman, The Princess and the Frog *
  29. “Bella Notte” – Peggy Lee and Sonny Burke, Lady and the Tramp
  30. “Grim Grinning Ghosts” – Buddy Baker and Xavier Atencio, arranged by John Debney, The Haunted Mansion
  31. “Pecos Bill” – Eliot Daniel and Johnny Lange, Melody Time
  32. “The Rainbow Connection” – Paul Williams, The Muppet Movie (Muppet*Vision area loop; 27:34 – 31:06 in the video)
  33. “You’ve Got a Friend in Me” (instrumental) – Randy Newman, Toy Story *
  34. “It’s a Small World” – Richard M. Sherman and Robert B. Sherman, arranged by John Debney, “it’s a small world”
  35. “A Whole New World” – Alan Menken and Tim Rice, Aladdin (from the original version of Aladdin JR.)

In the dead center of Disney Square, a bronze statue of Sorcerer Mickey conducts the waters of the Fantasia Fountain, an ornate “compass” of sorts. With its marching broomsticks and jumping fountains, the four cardinal points of the Fantasia Fountain direct us toward the various points of northern Walt Disney World. North, we find the Magic Kingdom; south, the Parking Center; west, the Polynesian Village Resort and the Grand Floridian Resort & Spa, in addition to Disney’s Wedding Pavilion and the Palm and Magnolia Golf Courses; east, the Wilderness Lodge, Fort Wilderness Resort & Campground, River Country, Athel Island, the world-class Contemporary Resort, and Walt Disney World’s newest resort hotel, the Villa Avventura Resort.

The Walt Disney World Monorail, WEDWay PeopleMover, elaborate Ferries, moving walkways and electric Trams offer simple, sophisticated transportation throughout the Resort. This high-tech transportation network, once thought to be that of science-fiction, is now in line with science-fact, free accommodations for all guests, save those who wish to explore by foot or by automobile.

A small but beautiful set of walking trails and man-made woods look to the shore of Seven Seas Lagoon, a staple since the resort was built. The 200-acre lake is home to real beaches and water sports; fishing, parasailing, and water skiing among others, activities which can also be found on its sister lagoon, Bay Lake. And not only that, these waters play host to a special, “free-to-the-public” nighttime spectacular…


electrical-water-pageant-gallery01.jpg




On October 25, 1971, the day Roy O. Disney officially dedicated Walt Disney World, the public first gazed upon the fantasy and wonder that is the Electrical Water Pageant. A Walt Disney World exclusive, this aquatic procession – which would go on to inspire the famous Main Street Electrical Parade – features unique floats depicting all sorts of nautical creatures, all performing to the strains of a unique soundtrack combining Jean-Jacques Perrey and Gershon Kingsley’s “Baroque Hoedown” with nautical-themed Disney music. The show has undergone many revisions over the years, the most recent one debuting in 2021, to celebrate the 50th anniversary of Walt Disney World.

After opening with the fanfare from the Main Street Electrical Parade, the show follows this template. And note, all the creatures depicted only use one float, except where noted.

  • Sea Serpent (comprised of four floats to suggest a long body): “Baroque Hoedown”
  • Whale: “A Whale of a Tale” from 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea
  • Turtle: “Baroque Hoedown”
  • Octopus: “Poor Unfortunate Souls” from The Little Mermaid
  • Jumping Dolphins (three separate floats): “Baroque Hoedown”
  • Crocodile: “Never Smile at a Crocodile” from Peter Pan
  • Three Mermaids: “Part of Your World” from The Little Mermaid
  • Neptune and Four Seahorses (two separate floats; one for Neptune and one for the seahorses): “Fanfare” and “Under the Sea” from The Little Mermaid
And then, much like with the MSEP, the show ends with a salute to the U.S. of A. All the floats have hidden lights on them, in the shape of either the American flag or of red, white and blue stars, and once Neptune and the seahorses have been highlighted, the nautical shapes fade to black and the patriotic shapes come alive to a medley of “You’re a Grand Old Flag”, “Yankee Doodle” and “America the Beautiful.” With that, the floats go sailing off to the next location, accompanied by one last reprise of “Baroque Hoedown” and the closing fanfare from the MSEP.

The pageant follows a set route, making sure to visit all the locations along the shores of the Seven Seas Lagoon and Bay Lake – first passing by Villa Avventura, then passing by the Polynesian Village, then Grand Floridian, then Wilderness Lodge, then Fort Wilderness, and then the Contemporary, before ending at the Magic Kingdom entrance.


world-of-disney-disneyland-paris-5.jpg

To the east of the Fantasia Fountain, Disney Square Imports sells all matter of merchandise and necessities. If you forgot to bring something with you, or if you’d like to pick up a last-minute gift for a loved one, this is the place to do it! Having opened in 2015, replacing Mickey’s Gift Station, Disney Square Imports is designed and decorated with crates and suitcases, the latest “imports” to arrive. In this circular gift shop, the walls are decorated with exotic locales as seen in the Disney movies (ex. Peter Pan in London, Lilo and Stitch in Hawaii, Tarzan in Africa, Carl and Russell in Venezuela), done similarly to the artwork at the World of Disney store in Disneyland Paris. Likewise, the domed ceiling is designed to look like the night sky, with the images of classic Disney characters representing various constellations (ex. Baloo as Ursa Major; Winnie the Pooh as Ursa Minor; Figment as Draco; and Hercules and Pegasus as their namesake constellations).

Exotic Locale Images (listed in clockwise order)
  • Mickey and the Gang in front of the Four Emblems of WDW (at 12:00)
  • Remy in Paris (at 1:00)
  • Peter Pan and the Darling Children in London
  • Tarzan in Africa
  • Mulan and Mushu in China
  • Moana on the Pacific Ocean
  • Lilo and Stitch in Hawaii
  • Luca, Alberto and Guilia in Italy
  • Aladdin, Jasmine and Genie in Agrabah
  • Bernard, Bianca and Jake in Australia
  • Carl and Russell in Venezuela
  • Anna and Elsa in Arendelle
Constellations
  • Aquarius – The Water-Bearer: Ariel
  • Aquila – The Eagle: Marahute
  • Aries – The Ram: Merlin as a ram
  • Cancer – The Crab: Sebastian
  • Canis Major – The Greater Dog: Lady
  • Canis Minor – The Lesser Dog: Tramp
  • Crater – The Cup: Chip
  • Draco – The Dragon: Figment
  • Equuleus – The Horse: Maximus
  • Gemini – The Twins: Chip and Dale
  • Hercules
  • Horologium – The Pendulum Clock: Cogsworth
  • Leo – The Lion: Mufasa
  • Leo Minor – The Smaller Lion: Young Simba
  • Libra – Balance: Jiminy Cricket
  • Pegasus
  • Pisces – The Fish: Nemo
  • Sagittarius – The Archer: Merida
  • Scorpius – The Scorpion: Scroop
  • Serpens – The Snake: Kaa
  • Taurus – The Bull: Babe the Blue Ox
  • Ursa Major – The Bear: Baloo
  • Ursa Minor – The Smaller Bear: Winnie the Pooh
  • Virgo – The Maiden: Snow White
  • Vulpecula – The Fox: Robin Hood

Disney Square Imports also serves as the home of Lost & Found, and there are ATMs found just outside.

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The western half of the complex consists mainly of the Gardens of Magic, a beautiful garden filled to the brim with gorgeous landscaping and vegetation and features many different Disney character topiaries and hidden “Easter eggs” that guests can enjoy finding. At night, the gardens transform as they glow with bio-luminescent technology, making the landscaping, vegetation and pathways glow with a magical vibe. Along the banks of the Seven Seas Lagoon near these Gardens is the ornate, Victorian Ferryboat Landing, offering ferry rides to the entrance of the Magic Kingdom.

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Also found here is the Village Market, a restaurant/bistro in the style of places like Moose Lodge in Lake Placid, as pictured above. Set along the waterside, in the shadow of the hill the Monorail Station sits upon, the Village Market usually opens about an hour and a half prior to park openings, so it is a good place to go if you want to have breakfast before you head to one of the parks for a day of fun. Coffee, pastries, eggs and bacon are on the menu; and during the day, salads, fruit, sandwiches and desserts are provided for lunch and dinner. The Market also features an outdoor eating garden and picnic area, offering dramatic views of the Seven Seas Lagoon, with the Main Street railroad station and Cinderella Castle in the distance. Naturally, restroom facilities are found here, as well as at the Disney Square Imports complex.

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Art by @TheDesignPirate

The most prevalent aspect of Disney Square is the Transportation Station, a combined hub for almost any and all transportation access; marked by its blue, white and silver color scheme and Mediterranean-style architecture, adding another sense of elegance to the Square. Inside, skylights and lush tropical plants soften the asphalt and concrete. Covered seating areas are available for waiting guests, also done in Mediterranean styling. The Transportation Station is a two-floor structure, with each floor servicing different forms of transportation. The ground floor services the following…
  • Public buses
  • Private vehicles (this includes taxis, ride-shares like Uber, Lyft, and Disney’s own Minnie Vans, and personal drop-offs from friends and family.)
  • Self-driving vehicles
  • Shuttles servicing Good Neighbor Hotels
  • Disney’s Magical Express, the service offering complimentary transportation and luggage delivery to on-site hotel guests coming from Orlando International Airport or Orlando-Sanford International Airport
Elevators, escalators and moving walkways bring guests up to the second floor of the Transportation Station, servicing the Walt Disney World Monorail, the stations for which remain where they are now (the various ramps are removed due to the new access methods).

Here is a map signifying where everything is in Disney Square:


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However, do note that in MWDW 3.0, the PeopleMover does not stop here at the Transportation Station.

Both the Monorail and the WEDWay PeopleMover also connect to the secondary hub of Walt Disney World…

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

…and we shall explore that secondary hub tomorrow!

I must credit @D Hulk for being the creator of the Gateway and most of the Transportation Station, both of which were concepts borrowed from his incredible DisneySky concept; so thank you very much, D Hulk!

The way I set up the Electrical Water Pageant for Mirror Walt Disney World is a combination of the 1971 original and the current version, utilizing one float that was removed in 1977 as well as the original inclusion of "Baroque Hoedown", and utilizing the idea of Disney songs being interwoven into the score. In fact, if you want to get a picture of what this Electrical Water Pageant will be like, check out these links: This one leads to a recreation of the 1971 original, and this one leads to a video of the current version.
 
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DisneyManOne

Well-Known Member
Original Poster
Venture Port

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Venture Port, which opened in 2002, is inspired by the original concept Herb Ryman designed for Walt’s EPCOT city, complete with its visage being marked by a tower and spire. Here in this circular hub, decorated in shades of blue and chrome, monorails dart to and from various locations, and the WEDWay PeopleMover glides over our heads. Parking trams pull in down below, bringing guests in from EPCOT’s various parking lots. Orchestral versions of EPCOT favorites fill the air. Skylights provide natural light, and fresh plants and trees add a splash of color to the area, blending in beautifully with the trees and flowers of World Bridge, EPCOT’s entrance plaza.

Much like the original EPCOT concept, Venture Port is radial, with the park’s main entrance being in the center of the hub, and the other amenities located around it. Venture Port is divided into two floors, each one offering different services. However, although Venture Port basically serves the same purpose to the south of WDW what Disney Square does to the north, Venture Port focuses much more on the transportation aspect. Thus, there is no custom restaurant to be found here, and although there is a gift shop, it is very small compared to Disney Square Imports.


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The Main Lobby of Venture Port is a thing of beauty. An elaborate indoor garden, complete with water features, is the focal point of the lobby. The various other amenities of Venture Port can be seen from the Main Lobby, and there are various directional signs pointing guests towards the Monorail and PeopleMover stations. Now, tying in to what I said about the hub and spoke layout, most of the amenities are located along each spoke. The Main Lobby is the hub, and at the northern end (by the way, I’m referring to these directions as they would appear if you viewed Venture Port directly from the south, facing Spaceship Earth) is the Main Entrance to EPCOT, with security checkpoints and turnstiles. The canopy that hangs over the turnstiles has become a greenhouse-like latticework of steel and glass draped in vines and “alien” flowers, a futuristic “conservatory” if you will (basically, how @MANEATINGWREATH described the Transportation Center of his Disneyland Plaza). At the southern end is the Tram Depot. Although cars are parked outside, the trams take you directly inside the Venture Port.

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The trams take off from the EPCOT Parking Center, which, as told by the name, offers parking for guests eager to spend a day at EPCOT. It’s divided into seven distinct lots: Amaze, Create, Discover, Explore, Imagine, Journey and Wonder. Collectively, these seven lots can hold over 11,000 cars.

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At the southeastern spoke, you’ll find Venture Port’s main shop, Mouse Gear. Mouse Gear basically serves as a counterpoint to Disney Square Imports. In this whimsical shop, gigantic, spinning gears and cogs add a “timeless” futuristic feel. It should feel like we are in the DreamPort, as seen in Journey Into Imagination. The wares? Typical EPCOT and Walt Disney World merchandise. Just like Disney Square Imports, the Mouse Gear complex also is the home of Lost and Found, and also offers ATMs.

Ramps found at the western and eastern ends of Venture Port lead up to the Second Floor. The Second Floor is home to the three Monorail Stations of Venture Port. The eastern ramp leads to the track that deposits guests at EPCOT, as well as the station servicing Disney’s Animal Kingdom; while the western ramp leads to the station servicing Disney’s Mythica. But that’s not all – these ramps also lead guests toward the PeopleMover Stations, found perpendicular from each monorail station. If you travel to EPCOT via the WEDWay PeopleMover, it is here where you disembark. The Purple Line is accessed from the eastern ramp, while the Yellow Line is accessed from the western ramp. And if you’re confused about what those lines are, don’t worry. We will get to those very soon.


~ ~ ~ ~ ~
In fact, I think we'll get to those tonight. This post was kinda on the short side, so I'll get the next post up later tonight to make up for it.
 
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DisneyManOne

Well-Known Member
Original Poster
Transportation at Walt Disney World

As everyone knows, Walt Disney World is quite a big place to get around. So naturally, there are a multitude of ways to get from one place to another. And given that this Mirror Walt Disney World takes place in the same universe as @MANEATINGWREATH’s third version of Mirror Disneyland, a world where Disney’s Hollywood Studios was never built, that means that transportation services are far more streamlined and accessible. So, since we’re discussing the Two Hubs of Walt Disney World, we may as well discuss the transportation options. And we’ll begin with the one everyone recognizes…

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“Please stand clear of the doors. Por favor manténgase alejado de las puertas.


The Walt Disney World Monorail is the original – and many would say, definitive – mode of Disney transportation. The “highway in the sky” was initially designed by Bob Gurr as a mere attraction for Tomorrowland at Disneyland; but in 1961, it was decided to put the Monorail to use as a legitimate mode of transport, taking guests over to the new Disneyland Hotel. When development began on Walt Disney World, it was only fitting to use the Monorail as a mode of transport there, as well.

The Walt Disney World Monorail mainly serves the area surrounding the Seven Seas Lagoon, though the futuristic transport also services the other three parks of Walt Disney World, as well as Disney Springs and a select few of the resorts, as well. There are five lines on the Monorail. Three are accessed from the Transportation Station at Disney Square:

  • The Express Line takes guests directly from Disney Square over to the Magic Kingdom.​
  • The Resort Line begins at Disney Square, then makes a counter-clockwise trip around the Seven Seas Lagoon, stopping at the Polynesian Village, the Grand Floridian, the Magic Kingdom, the Contemporary and Villa Avventura.​
  • The EPCOT Line offers direct service from Disney Square to EPCOT and back again.​
And the other two lines are accessed from Venture Port. Like with the EPCOT Line, there are switch spurs on the tracks leading to the two stations, located on either side of the Venture Port. Anyway, the two lines accessed here are as follows:
  • The Mythica Line, accessed on the left-hand side of Venture Port, makes three stops. The first stop services three locations in one: Disney’s Mythica, Disney Springs and Disney’s Saratoga Springs Resort & Spa. The station is located in-between the Village Marketplace and the entrance to Disney’s Mythica, its architecture blending in with the American Craftsman style of the Marketplace. From there, the monorail makes a stop at Disney’s Caribbean Beach Resort, then takes guests back to EPCOT.​
  • The Animal Kingdom Line, accessed on the right-hand side, takes guests from Venture Port to Disney’s Animal Kingdom, then over to Disney’s Animal Kingdom Lodge, and then making a stop at Disney’s Coronado Springs Resort before a quick return to EPCOT.​
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In 2021, just in time for Walt Disney World’s 50th anniversary, the monorails got an update. New “Mark VIII” monorail trains were built and put into service. The Mark VIII trains maintain the iconic design of their predecessors – the Mark IV and the Mark VI – and have been updated with modern sensibilities. Like with their predecessors, Mark VIII monorails have six cars per train, with grey seats, granite flooring and black wall carpeting, while the walls at each end of each car are painted in the train’s respective color. Not only that, those particular walls have three distinct stripes, with the middle stripe (where one can find the fire extinguisher and emergency intercom) containing the Monorail System logo and the name of the train, and the top and bottom stripes being patterned with the “D” from the original WDW logo. Plus, a stripe also in the train’s color runs along the ceiling of each car, as well.

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Each car of the Mark VIII monorail has a specific function. The first and last cars have the pilot’s cabins, along with a passenger compartment; and it should be noted that although the monorails are completely automated nowadays, the pilots are still necessary in case of emergency. The second and fifth cars are open and spacious to accommodate wheelchairs and strollers more easily, with benches on each end of the cabin, and on the side walls. Finally, the two middle cars have a similar style to the Mark VI monorails – split into two compartments, each containing two facing benches and enough room for more passengers to stand.

There are twenty monorail trains in service, each one marked by – and named for – the colored stripe that runs along the train: Red, Crimson, Coral, Orange, Peach, Yellow, Lime, Green, Teal, Aquamarine, Blue, Indigo, Purple, Lavender, Pink, Brown, Black, White, Gold and Silver. To help differentiate themselves from Monorails Red, Orange, Green, Blue and Purple, Monorails Crimson, Coral, Lime, Teal and Indigo have white deltas along their stripes. Furthermore, Monorail White has black deltas along its stripes to help it stand out more (thus earning it the affectionate nickname ‘Monorail Zebra’).


* In this Mirror universe, the 2009 crash does not occur, so Monorail Purple and Monorail Pink remain in service.

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And if you’re curious as to what I mean by “deltas”, they are those white sections in the middle of the coral stripe on each section of the monorail. Monorail Coral, as mentioned before, is just one of a few monorails that has these deltas.

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“Welcome aboard the WEDWay PeopleMover. I’m AG-71, and I’ll be serving as your automated guide. You could say I’m a ‘commuter computer!’ Well, anyways, please sit back, relax and enjoy yourselves as we ride through the Most Magical Place on Earth.”


The WEDWay PeopleMover, put into service in 2005, serves as the primary mode of transport around the resort. Basically an expanded version of the PeopleMover that takes guests above the streets of Tomorrowland at Disneyland and the Magic Kingdom, the WEDWay PeopleMover never stops moving, even while passengers board and disembark, either from a rotating platform or a moving walkway station. With no motor of their own, the PeopleMover cars are powered by magnetic motors embedded within the track.

Hourly capacity is over 10,000 riders. Loading is far more efficient than the buses that this system replaced, as guests can board without needing to collapse their strollers or select a dedicated seat. Tracks are elevated in order to minimize physical intrusion; and, much like the original Disneyland PeopleMover, the track can be raised and lowered, to avoid running into the Monorail tracks. Plus, this PeopleMover utilizes fully-enclosed cars, allowing for quick and efficient travel, even in Florida’s notorious inclement weather.

Furthermore, in an idea thought up by @Magic Feather, the WEDWay PeopleMover makes use of a multi-line system. There are four major stations, one for each theme park. Within each park’s resort area are lines that service the resorts and other surrounding areas; and each major station connects with each other, offering direct service to the parks. This will significantly reduce travel time, and make the service far more efficient than the line set-up I had previously used.

The five lines of the WEDWay PeopleMover are as follows:

  • The Yellow Line (Main Line) connects the four major stations.​
  • The Red Line (Magic Kingdom Line) connects the Magic Kingdom, Disney’s Wilderness Lodge and Disney’s Fort Wilderness Resort and Campground / River Country.​
  • The Purple Line (EPCOT Line) connects EPCOT, Disney’s Yacht & Beach Club Resorts, the Walt Disney World Swan and Dolphin and Disney’s BoardWalk Inn & Villas.​
  • The Green Line (Animal Kingdom Line) connects Disney’s Animal Kingdom, Blizzard Beach and Disney’s Art of Animation Resort.​
  • The Blue Line (Mythica Line) connects Disney’s Mythica, Disney Springs, Typhoon Lagoon, Disney’s Port Orleans Resort – Riverside and Disney’s Port Orleans Resort – French Quarter.
Now, the PeopleMover has thirty five-car trains to it along each line, thus having 150 trains in service…although technically, there are 175 trains in total, but only 30 can be run simultaneously on each line. With so many trains and quick travel time, the PeopleMover allows for swifter service compared to a Monorail… and for that matter, compared to a bus. Likewise, having multiple trains along each line severely reduces waiting for one.

For the design of the PeopleMover trains themselves, they were influenced by Herb Ryman’s original design for a fully-enclosed PeopleMover, created for a proposed plan to have a community built along Lake Buena Vista. What’s more, the trains have five unique color schemes, each one utilizing the color of the line they run – yellow, red, purple, green and blue. Not only does this provide a unique, kinetic energy, but it also helps people to recognize which line is which. For example, you wouldn’t find a blue PeopleMover train running along the Red Line, and vice-versa.

The interiors of each car of the train feature carpeting on the seats, allowing guests to sit in comfort, as well as a floor carpet done in the color of the car/line. Wide windows allow breathtaking views. Along the ceilings of each car, you’ll be able to see a lighted map, similar to what can be seen on the Paris Metro or London Underground, with each station lighting up once the train reaches it. There is ample seating – six seats per cars, plus handrails for standing passengers. A pre-recorded vocal spiel courtesy of our automated computer guide, AG-71, narrates the journey, welcoming guests to the Walt Disney World Resort, announcing the next stop, and sharing fun facts and park hours. Enchanting music provides a relaxing underscore to compliment the narration.


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But the Monorail and the PeopleMover are not the only modes of transport found here. Although the WEDWay PeopleMover has rendered bus service meaningless, there’s still one area of Mirror Walt Disney World where bus service remains the norm: Fort Wilderness. Since the place is so big, and since the PeopleMover would ruin the immersion of being in the wilderness, bus service takes guests around the resort, with stops throughout the area – the biggest being the Settlement Outpost, where the restaurants, shops, the pathway to River Country, the resort’s PeopleMover station and the marina are.

Speaking of which, four other resorts on Disney property – specifically, Caribbean Beach, Port Orleans – Riverside, Coronado Springs and Saratoga Springs – are also quite big places to get around. Therefore, each of these resorts has a rather unique way to get around the resort. Caribbean Beach offers beach trolleys and Cuban coco-taxis, while POR and Saratoga Springs make use of horse-drawn carriages and hansom cabs, respectively, as well as old-fashioned taxis come nighttime, and Coronado Springs utilizes chivas and chicken buses.


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In addition, Walt Disney World offers a great fleet of boats in service, for those who want to glide along the waterways of the World to reach their destination. There are four distinct boat lines in the resort.
  • Disney Square Ferry Service
    • Offering direct service from Disney Square to the Magic Kingdom
    • Utilizes three ferries: the blue-trimmed General Joe Potter, the red-trimmed Richard F. Irvine and the green-trimmed Admiral Joe Fowler
  • Seven Seas Lagoon – Bay Lake Launch System
    • A series of launches and cruisers taking guests to the various points of the Magic Kingdom Resort Area. There are four distinct lines in this system, each one identified by a colored flag displayed on the boat.
      • Gold Flag Line: Utilizing two launches, this line connects the Magic Kingdom to the Polynesian Village and the Grand Floridian
      • Green Flag Line: Utilizing two cruisers, this line connects the Magic Kingdom to Fort Wilderness
      • Red Flag Line: Utilizing both a launch and a cruiser, this line connects the Magic Kingdom to Wilderness Lodge
      • Blue Flag Line: Utilizing two launches, this line connects the Contemporary to Fort Wilderness and Wilderness Lodge
  • FriendShip Boat Service
    • Mainly servicing Crescent Lake, this service connects EPCOT’s International Gateway to the BoardWalk, Swan & Dolphin and Yacht & Beach Club. A second FriendShip Service is used within EPCOT itself, as a mode of transportation to get around World Showcase.
  • Sassagoula Steamboat Co.
    • Tying into the storyline set up by Disney’s Port Orleans Resort, this fifteen-strong fleet of water taxis takes guests along the Sassagoula River, connecting the various locations found therein. Like the Seven Seas – Bay Lake Launch System, colored flags identify each line the Sassagoula Steamboat Co. services.
      • Yellow/Purple Flag Line: This line connects Port Orleans – with the yellow flag servicing Riverside and the purple flag servicing French Quarter – to the Village Marketplace at Disney Springs. Given its certain location, this line also connects Port Orleans to Disney’s Mythica, which is accessed naught but a short walk away from the Marketplace.
      • Blue Flag/Green Flag Line: This line connects Saratoga Springs – with the blue flag servicing the Treehouse Villas and the green flag servicing the rest of the resort – to Pleasure Island at Disney Springs.
      • Red Flag Line: This line serves as an internal route for Disney Springs, connecting the Village Marketplace, Pleasure Island, the West Side and the Lights District.
With our excitement mounting, we rush inside the Transportation Station and hop aboard the next monorail, which has just pulled in. I’m sure you all know where we are heading…

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

I must say that the Mark VIII monorail concept was devised for The Creator Games in 2015 by "Team Treasure" -- a team that was comprised of @TheOriginalTiki, @MCParradox, @JokersWild, @DisneyPrincess1993, @orlando678-, @tcool and @RMichael21; so all credit goes to them! Now that we've gotten the history and some of the resort infrastructure down, I'm going to be spacing out the posts from here on out. Since the theme parks are coming up, I really want to keep you guys wanting more. So, expect to see posts coming by every three to five days from here on out.

In fact, the next post -- the first one regarding the Magic Kingdom -- will be coming out on Monday, October 10. See you then!
 
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