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Haunted Mansion to Return with New Enhancements and Magic :(

George Lucas on a Bench

Well-Known Member
Welcome...to The Haunted Mansion. A Boundless Realm of the supahnatural.

1cc5d15e1023d766726318af1f7fa63cae90be7a.gif
 

PiratesMansion

Well-Known Member
It works, but let's not pretend we are entering through the front door. Or even the first floor of the house. We're entering in through some basement level built into the side of a hill.

Here's a good late 1960's Imagineering sketch on the elevation used for WDW, and that weird little crypt structure we enter into off of the house's left flanks.

View attachment 552247

I keep thinking how much better it works in Tokyo, because the queue turns left in front of the house and has a spooky garden it goes through that gives you plenty of time to take in the house visuals. But then I was reminded that they really built out this left side of the house compared to WDW. In Tokyo they built the house on a rocky bluff, and expanded the house into the bluff itself as though there is a wing of the house built above the rocks that you queue underneath. Here's a pretty good photo of Tokyo's expanded wing built above the queue...

15403467298_31347f8a89_b.jpg
That window is actually from Grandma Sara's, the "Splash Mountain" restaurant. It's definitely cool, and the design helps conceal the closeness of the restaurant while simultaneously selling the Mansion area a bit better than at Magic Kingdom. A solid plussing.

That said, before Critter Country was built out there I'm sure the Haunted Mansion queue and the visuals of the building looked just like Florida's. Don't they even have the tent queue in Tokyo too (albeit not as enormous and all-consuming as it is at MK)?
 

owlsandcoffee

Well-Known Member
That window is actually from Grandma Sara's, the "Splash Mountain" restaurant. It's definitely cool, and helps conceal the closeness of the restaurant while simultaneously selling the Mansion area a bit better than at Magic Kingdom. A solid plussing.

That said, before Critter Country was built out there I'm sure the Haunted Mansion queue and the visuals of the building looked just like Florida's. Don't they even have the tent queue in Tokyo too (albeit not as enormous and all-consuming as it is at MK)?

Well color me impressed, that's some solid theming.

I think Tokyo's was identical to MK's when it opened, although the queue layout was different. You approach the house head on, at first, instead of from the side and all around it.
 

GrandCanyonConcourse

Well-Known Member
It works, but let's not pretend we are entering through the front door. Or even the first floor of the house. We're entering in through some basement level built into the side of a hill.

Here's a good late 1960's Imagineering sketch on the elevation used for WDW, and that weird little crypt structure we enter into off of the house's left flanks.

View attachment 552247

I keep thinking how much better it works in Tokyo, because the queue turns left in front of the house and has a spooky garden it goes through that gives you plenty of time to take in the house visuals. But then I was reminded that they really built out this left side of the house compared to WDW. In Tokyo they built the house on a rocky bluff, and expanded the house into the bluff itself as though there is a wing of the house built above the rocks that you queue underneath. Here's a pretty good photo of Tokyo's expanded wing built above the queue...

15403467298_31347f8a89_b.jpg
It’s also in Fantasyland next to Dumbo
 

TP2000

Well-Known Member
It’s also in Fantasyland next to Dumbo

It's not just next to Dumbo, it literally frames Dumbo. And not just any Dumbo, but a 1970's 10-arm version of Dumbo. On a cement pad. A cement pad coated with fresh slurry paint quarterly, and antiseptically cleaned every night. But a cement pad nevertheless. :cool:

Dumbo%201.jpg


It's as if WDI took every bland, corporate design decision they made for WDW in 1970 and amplified it just a bit for Tokyo in '83.

I'm not up to speed on the latest Tokyo news, after my planned 2020 trip was cancelled, but I seem to remember they were going to finally fix this. I kind of wish they wouldn't.

Seriously, it's like the best of ham-handed 1970's corporate design that gave us most of Magic Kingdom Park circa 1971, but with slightly sloppier brush strokes. You can't pay for that sort of magic, it just has to happen once every generation or three.
 
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owlsandcoffee

Well-Known Member
It's not just next to Dumbo, it literally frames Dumbo. And not just any Dumbo, but a 1970's 10-arm version of Dumbo. On a cement pad. A cement pad coated with fresh slurry paint quarterly, and antiseptically cleaned every night. But a cement pad nevertheless. :cool:

Dumbo%201.jpg


It's as if WDI took every bland, corporate design decision they made for WDW in 1970 and amplified it just a bit for Tokyo in '83.

I'm not up to speed on the latest Tokyo news, after my planned 2020 trip was cancelled by the China Virus, but I seem to remember they were going to finally fix this. I kind of wish they wouldn't.

Seriously, it's like the best of ham-handed 1970's corporate design that gave us most of Magic Kingdom Park circa 1971, but with slightly sloppier brush strokes. You can't pay for that sort of magic, it just has to happen once every generation or three.
Looking at Google Earth, Dumbo was still Dumboing there as of January. That might be the most baffling thing I've ever seen.
 

TP2000

Well-Known Member
Looking at Google Earth, Dumbo was still Dumboing there as of January. That might be the most baffling thing I've ever seen.

Isn't it great?!? Immediately south of Dumbo are a few classic 1970's dark rides; Peter Pan and Snow White.

All perfectly maintained, as if they just opened in 1983, except it's well into the 21st century. And all slathered in fresh slurry paint on the ground that is swept clean every 5 minutes and sterilized every night. With smiling Japanese Cast Members who are perfectly groomed and expertly managed. It's the weirdest and yet most charming version of a Disney theme park you've ever seen. It's perfection, really.


PC031812.JPG
 

TP2000

Well-Known Member
Everything I've seen of Tokyo feels like a time capsule into WDW circa 1975.

That's exactly what it is.

What happened is that Walt Disney Productions circa 1980 sat down and wrote a manual for the Oriental Land Company on how to operate and manage a Disneyland. And the Japanese, being Japanese, took that manual and studied it as if it was the Bible. And they followed and obeyed that manual to the letter, even if their American counterparts weren't actually following it completely in 1980. But the Japanese took it very, very seriously and codified it into quantifiable facts and actionable results. And they opened their Disneyland based on that in 1983 and then they just kept going, decade after decade, returning to the source material whenever they had a question or a quandry.

The result here in the 21st century is that Tokyo Disneyland is an expertly run and managed theme park based on the principles of Walt Disney Productions circa 1975-1982. But you get to buy a ticket and go in even if it's 2021. And it's still the same. And it's perfect.

Meanwhile, in the United States...

2021-WDW-EPCOT-Tower-of-Terror-Tattoo-3-427x600.jpg
 

SuddenStorm

Well-Known Member
That's exactly what it is.

What happened is that Walt Disney Productions circa 1980 sat down and wrote a manual for the Oriental Land Company on how to operate and manage a Disneyland. And the Japanese, being Japanese, took that manual and studied it as if it was the Bible. And they followed and obeyed that manual to the letter, even if their American counterparts weren't actually following it completely in 1980. But the Japanese took it very, very seriously and codified it into quantifiable facts and actionable results. And they opened their Disneyland based on that in 1983 and then they just kept going, decade after decade, returning to the source material whenever they had a question or a quandry.

The result here in the 21st century is that Tokyo Disneyland is an expertly run and managed theme park based on the principles of Walt Disney Productions circa 1975-1982. But you get to buy a ticket and go in even if it's 2021. And it's still the same. And it's perfect.

Meanwhile, in the United States...

2021-WDW-EPCOT-Tower-of-Terror-Tattoo-3-427x600.jpg

I'm more interested in visiting Tokyo Disneyland then I am WDW.

I mean they have CBJ, the 'purest' version of Pirates and Mansion on the planet, and by all accounts it's maintained and ran like we wish Anaheim was.
 

unmitigated disaster

Well-Known Member
That's exactly what it is.

What happened is that Walt Disney Productions circa 1980 sat down and wrote a manual for the Oriental Land Company on how to operate and manage a Disneyland. And the Japanese, being Japanese, took that manual and studied it as if it was the Bible. And they followed and obeyed that manual to the letter, even if their American counterparts weren't actually following it completely in 1980. But the Japanese took it very, very seriously and codified it into quantifiable facts and actionable results. And they opened their Disneyland based on that in 1983 and then they just kept going, decade after decade, returning to the source material whenever they had a question or a quandry.

The result here in the 21st century is that Tokyo Disneyland is an expertly run and managed theme park based on the principles of Walt Disney Productions circa 1975-1982. But you get to buy a ticket and go in even if it's 2021. And it's still the same. And it's perfect.

Meanwhile, in the United States...

2021-WDW-EPCOT-Tower-of-Terror-Tattoo-3-427x600.jpg
What's wrong with how she looks?
 

WillWrambles

Well-Known Member
In the Parks
No
That's exactly what it is.

What happened is that Walt Disney Productions circa 1980 sat down and wrote a manual for the Oriental Land Company on how to operate and manage a Disneyland. And the Japanese, being Japanese, took that manual and studied it as if it was the Bible. And they followed and obeyed that manual to the letter, even if their American counterparts weren't actually following it completely in 1980. But the Japanese took it very, very seriously and codified it into quantifiable facts and actionable results. And they opened their Disneyland based on that in 1983 and then they just kept going, decade after decade, returning to the source material whenever they had a question or a quandry.

The result here in the 21st century is that Tokyo Disneyland is an expertly run and managed theme park based on the principles of Walt Disney Productions circa 1975-1982. But you get to buy a ticket and go in even if it's 2021. And it's still the same. And it's perfect.

Meanwhile, in the United States...

2021-WDW-EPCOT-Tower-of-Terror-Tattoo-3-427x600.jpg
That’s a human being right there. Not a tool for your Disney vacations.
 

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