Has RotR changed riders' minds about Galactic Starcruiser?

SoCalMort

Active Member
Original Poster
For those who have ridden, has it made you more open, less open, or other, to book a trip on the Starcruiser?
 

Sirwalterraleigh

Premium Member
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For those who have ridden, has it made you more open, less open, or other, to book a trip on the Starcruiser?
The appeal of this is tied to the state of the IP for me...

And boy...do we have a “mixed bag” of that coming this week
 

trojanjustin

Well-Known Member
The attraction was lots of fun, the performance theming of the cast was great. Does it make me think the cruise ship meets cosplay for three days is the best route for them to go? Probably not.
 

Next Big Thing

Well-Known Member
I mean, Rise is a huge technical achievement and a marvel of modern theme park rides, but it comes with admission (as long as you get to the park early enough to get a boarding pass). Galactic Cruiser is for the Uber rick and the real question is how many Star Wars fans have that type of money to throw around to play dress up?
 

NoFunInBand

Active Member
I'm a massive, massive Star Wars fan and I actually love the sequels and most of the stuff that has released post-Disney buyout. So I guess I'm the primary target audience. I just have big reservations of dedicating two entire days in Orlando to just this one thing when there is already so much else to do in WDW. And I know no one else in my family would be psyched for this so I'm not going to drag them along and also commit two of their days to it. This is all before we even get to pricing.

Rise of the Resistance was phenomenal.
 

ParkerLoLs

Well-Known Member
I enjoyed the attraction immensely, instant classic. But I could see getting overwhelmed by the constant immersion quickly. It all depends on the execution. But for the price, I don't think it's something I'll ever experience anyway.
 

bubbles1812

Well-Known Member
I loved Rise of the Resistance and I very much like Star Wars. The hotel and ride are not really linked in my head and certainly wasn’t something I was thinking about this past week.

So I would say I’m effectively where I was before... I find the idea of the hotel intriguing and it’s possibly something I’ll do once, pending the price.
 

Ravenclaw78

Well-Known Member
All the Star Wars fans in my social circle (which admittedly consists mostly, though not entirely, of upper-middle-class couples/families with $100K-$250K annual incomes, but we're hardly the 1%) have been posting that Futurama "Take My Money" meme every time Disney releases even the tiniest bit of information about Galactic Starcruiser, ever since the first concept art surfaced a couple of years ago. Many of us are current or former LARPers and tabletop roleplayers, so that does factor in and of course it's anecdotal evidence at best, but I think there's plenty of interest in the concept among those for whom the price is steep but not impossible.
 

networkpro

Well-Known Member
In the Parks
Yes
Personally I don't see the attraction nor entertainment value in being cloistered for 2 days.

My wife and I enjoy being outdoors far too much to find it compelling.
 

hakunamatata

Beautiful
Premium Member
Are there people who will pay this to stay, yes. I think the question should be, how many repeat trips and how long will the demand remain for this experience. Will Disney be able to book this experience out long term and will the profit margin be high enough long term to keep Disney from “reimagining” the space in the short term.
 

Bleed0range

Well-Known Member
Are there people who will pay this to stay, yes. I think the question should be, how many repeat trips and how long will the demand remain for this experience. Will Disney be able to book this experience out long term and will the profit margin be high enough long term to keep Disney from “reimagining” the space in the short term.
The answer is no. I see them having to retheme that hotel or turn it into a new hotel within 10 years. The fanboys who want to live the SW dream are mostly fans of the OT, who are already 30-50 and I don’t think the younger generation will ever be as obsessed with it. I also think once someone has done this once that’s probably it.
 

ImperfectPixie

Well-Known Member
If this is going to be successful, Disney is going to have to offer multiple "story lines" and change things up often. The few that want to and can afford to pay for an experience like this aren't likely to want the same experience over and over again. Just ask my boys about Great Wolf Lodge. (They got sick of it after 2 or 3 visits, and they're pretty hard-core water park lovers. There just isn't enough variety at GWL.)
 

Ravenclaw78

Well-Known Member
The answer is no. I see them having to retheme that hotel or turn it into a new hotel within 10 years. The fanboys who want to live the SW dream are mostly fans of the OT, who are already 30-50 and I don’t think the younger generation will ever be as obsessed with it. I also think once someone has done this once that’s probably it.
With the limited quantity of rooms, I expect that even without repeat bookings, there's enough demand to keep it running for years. If they deliver on what they've described (certainly not guaranteed) and periodically refresh the activities and plotlines, there'll be enough repeat "cruisers" to go at least a decade. That said, it wouldn't surprise me if they're only expecting the hotel to last 15 years or so (a fairly typical lifetime for a theme park attraction).

If this is going to be successful, Disney is going to have to offer multiple "story lines" and change things up often. The few that want to and can afford to pay for an experience like this aren't likely to want the same experience over and over again. Just ask my boys about Great Wolf Lodge. (They got sick of it after 2 or 3 visits, and they're pretty hard-core water park lovers. There just isn't enough variety at GWL.)
If GWL actually performed routine upkeep on the components of their magic wand game instead of leaving everything in a constant state of disrepair, and had randomized plotlines instead of everyone having the same exact quest every time, it wouldn't have been a one-and-done for our family. The water park is fun, but the kid needs something to keep her busy when we're not swimming, and she got really frustrated with worn-out wand sensors and burned-in screens.
 
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