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News Guardians of the Galaxy Cosmic Rewind attraction confirmed for Epcot

Maeryk

Well-Known Member
I think the attention spans of many visitors don't last 45 minutes.

People complain about 15 minute rides now.. they are "uncomfortable" for that duration. Whether it's the aging of the population, less physical health, or just the heffalumping of the average guest, longer rides are passe.. and not just at Disney.
 

Hatbox Ghostbuster

Well-Known Member
People complain about 15 minute rides now.. they are "uncomfortable" for that duration. Whether it's the aging of the population, less physical health, or just the heffalumping of the average guest, longer rides are passe.. and not just at Disney.
I have my own opinions on why this is....but to keep this a pleasant conversation, I'll just summarize and say I agree with you :)
 

kpilcher

Well-Known Member
I've been editing Symbiosis recently. By god, if today's guest thinks SSE 07 is cleverly written they'd think this film was in a foreign language.
Fun Fact: Symbiosis was my first Epcot attraction in Nov. of '82. SSE was down, Listen to the Land's line was hours long, so Mom & Dad picked Symbiosis. The crowd levels were so bad that day in Future World (WS was not bad, overall) that the Symbiosis cast member was met with a very UN-Disney response when she asked how everyone was doing. IIRC, we spent about 4-5 hours inside "The Land" that day to do all three attractions and eat. But Epcot Center was never popular so I must be imagining things ;)
 

The Empress Lilly

Well-Known Member
Walt had a thing for Dinosaurs. It's evident from very early on.. (Fantasia) and cropped up in other places too. I think he wanted a dinosaur ride from day one, but the tech had not evolved to the point that they could do it "right" until plans for the Epcot pavilions were underway. And since there were still people involved who shared his specific zeal and dream, that's when it got done. The Energy concept almost seemed shoehorned in from the first day it opened. Mainly, it was a new ride tech (trackless, rotating theater) showcased in the biggest moving dinosaur sets anyone had ever seen. (Even if some of the moving parts were problematic).

Even with as hokey as it was, I still prefer the original to Ellen's Energy Lecture, and always will.
I think the dinos crept in because, firstly, as they say - not devoid of truthful cynicism - in Ellen because dinosaurs are simply cool. And secondly, dinosaurs, the one physical set of Energy, can be moved over from one version of the ride to the next, while the movies and lasers and music can be easily updated to keep the ride current.
 

Amidala

Well-Known Member
People complain about 15 minute rides now.. they are "uncomfortable" for that duration. Whether it's the aging of the population, less physical health, or just the heffalumping of the average guest, longer rides are passe.. and not just at Disney.

I think it's the amusement parks themselves that are changing–not the guests. Between advancements in ride technology, an increase in guest attendance (attendance across WDW in 1980 totaled about 13.8 million, which is less than MK alone sees today) and the prioritization of getting as many attractions as possible done in the shortest amount of time (w/ the help of MyMagic and FP+, MagicBands, etc.), the culture of tourism at the parks is fundamentally different. IMO, this is an attitude Disney has actively encouraged in its guests, and definitely not a mark of their increased laziness or poor health or anything else of the sort.

This is a different system but, IMO, not necessarily...a bad one. I would argue that a 45-minute "edutainment" ride ran the risk of boring guests (and children especially) even in the 80s and 90s. A streamlined, modern edutainment ride clocking in at 10 minutes or less can still teach guests something if it chooses a specific enough topic, rather than trying to convey a huge topic on much broader terms within a 15+ minute time-frame. The use of actually relevant IPs (like Inside Out and Big Hero 6, which have been painfully underutilized in Epcot outside of meet-and-greets) could help.
 

Amidala

Well-Known Member
@Biff215 I do, thank you! Here's what I should have been looking at (inclusive of Epcot):
 

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Maeryk

Well-Known Member
I think it's the amusement parks themselves that are changing–not the guests. Between advancements in ride technology, an increase in guest attendance (attendance across WDW in 1980 totaled about 13.8 million, which is less than MK alone sees today) and the prioritization of getting as many attractions as possible done in the shortest amount of time (w/ the help of MyMagic and FP+, MagicBands, etc.), the culture of tourism at the parks is fundamentally different. IMO, this is an attitude Disney has actively encouraged in its guests, and definitely not a mark of their increased laziness or poor health or anything else of the sort.

This is a different system but, IMO, not necessarily...a bad one. I would argue that a 45-minute "edutainment" ride ran the risk of boring guests (and children especially) even in the 80s and 90s. A streamlined, modern edutainment ride clocking in at 10 minutes or less can still teach guests something if it chooses a specific enough topic, rather than trying to convey a huge topic on much broader terms within a 15+ minute time-frame. The use of actually relevant IPs (like Inside Out and Big Hero 6, which have been painfully underutilized in Epcot outside of meet-and-greets) could help.

Interactive queues are also a newer concept, that can extend well beyond the ride itself. Heck, you get what.. 3 to 4 hours of info on Pandora! ;)
 

egg

Well-Known Member
I like the idea that's been tossed around here and there... a sitting queue. Basically a giant bench that moves... so you can have a seat, relax, take a nap, etc. etc. while you're waiting, before the preshows. I think that would be a bit confusing to your average guest at first (they may think it's the ride), but in the end it'd go a long way toward making waiting a more manageable experience, especially for families with young children.

Interactive queues are also a newer concept, that can extend well beyond the ride itself. Heck, you get what.. 3 to 4 hours of info on Pandora! ;)

Indeed. This GotG attraction will wind up being more than 45 minutes long for most guests. Unfortunately most of that time will be spent standing in line.
 

rocketraccoon

Well-Known Member
Photo updates when UoE closes will go here until we get an Epcot subforum I suppose.

I wonder if they're gonna install new solar panels on the roof. The current ones aren't in superb shape at the moment and solar panel efficiency has evolved a good amount since they were installed. At the very least the concept art has some panels either way.

PsUQngA.jpg


Sure were a lot of nicely dressed CMs going into the building this morning.
 

Incomudro

Well-Known Member
People complain about 15 minute rides now.. they are "uncomfortable" for that duration. Whether it's the aging of the population, less physical health, or just the heffalumping of the average guest, longer rides are passe.. and not just at Disney.
All of the above, plus a shorter attention span.
 

Kman101

Well-Known Member
All of the above, plus a shorter attention span.

I don't always think it's shorter attention span. I mean look how much "binging" tv shows is a thing now. People can sit for hours watching something as long as they're engaged with the content. But it seems that doesn't always apply to a theme park though, people want quick thrills, which is a shame. They're fun and have their place but still.
 

MansionButler84

Well-Known Member
I don't always think it's shorter attention span. I mean look how much "binging" tv shows is a thing now. People can sit for hours watching something as long as they're engaged with the content. But it seems that doesn't always apply to a theme park though, people want quick thrills, which is a shame. They're fun and have their place but still.
Binging actually is a product of the shortened attention span. We can no longer tolerate a show with a story that spans 40 weeks of the year. We either wait for the entire season to end so we can binge-watch without commercials or the distribution company releases an entire season at once so we can watch it in one evening and move on.

And now we are raising children on this. They can select the exact show and exact episode they want on a tablet. My kids always get frustrated if we put on the actual TV and they have to just watch what is on.
 

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