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News Guardians of the Galaxy Cosmic Rewind attraction confirmed for Epcot

danlb_2000

Well-Known Member
I'm spitballing here, and it's probably already been discussed elsewhere, but I'm guessing that the roof/walls were constructed first due to all the integrated electronics/technologies built into the track/ride that needed shielding from the weather. This ain't space mountain after all.
Anything that sensitive would be installed after the track had been installed.
 

monothingie

Skyliner Survivor
Premium Member
I'm spitballing here, and it's probably already been discussed elsewhere, but I'm guessing that the roof/walls were constructed first due to all the integrated electronics/technologies built into the track/ride that needed shielding from the weather. This ain't space mountain after all.
You can't even do the rough electric work (running conduit, putting up boxes, etc) until the building is weather tight, because all the inside electrical materials don't carry a weather rating.
 

T.Will

Well-Known Member
Literally. Its an off-the-shelf coaster they put in a box and added cutouts
I think it was a custom layout made for Disney. Mainly because there's only one other version of this ride (as far as I know) and it came after RNRC. I think an off-the-shelf model would constitute something like an Arrow Corkscrew, which was all over the place.
 
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Bairstow

Well-Known Member
I think it was a custom layout made for Disney. Mainly because there's only one other version of this ride (as far as I know) and it came after RNRC. I think an off-the-shelf model would constitute something like an Arrow Corkscrew, which was all over the place.
It wasn't just that particular layout- Rock-n was the first LSM coaster Vekoma ever built, so I would imagine that after the success of the Paris Space Mountain, they shopped the hardware to Disney first but retained rights to the technology and layout as part of their agreement.
 

lazyboy97o

Well-Known Member
I think it was a custom layout made for Disney. Mainly because there's only one other version of this ride (as far as I know) and it came after RNRC. I think an off-the-shelf model would constitute something like an Arrow Corkscrew, which was all over the place.
It wasn't just that particular layout- Rock-n was the first LSM coaster Vekoma ever built, so I would imagine that after the success of the Paris Space Mountain, they shopped the hardware to Disney first but retained rights to the technology and layout as part of their agreement.
Exclusivity of track layout is something purchased. That Disney opted not to purchase exclusivity suggests they likely had little involvement in its design. Somebody is always first to buy an "off the shelf" design.
 

Bairstow

Well-Known Member
Exclusivity of track layout is something purchased. That Disney opted not to purchase exclusivity suggests they likely had little involvement in its design. Somebody is always first to buy an "off the shelf" design.
We don't know to what extent WDI was or was not involved with the design, but even assuming they were not, that doesn't mean that the layout wasn't designed with MGM Studios in mind and presented to Disney first. The "off the shelf" expression implies that the item being sold is 1.) already available for purchase and 2) offered to anyone. Given Vekoma's long history of debuting new ride concepts with Disney, that doesn't seem to be what happened.
 

lazyboy97o

Well-Known Member
We don't know to what extent WDI was or was not involved with the design, but even assuming they were not, that doesn't mean that the layout wasn't designed with MGM Studios in mind and presented to Disney first. The "off the shelf" expression implies that the item being sold is 1.) already available for purchase and 2) offered to anyone. Given Vekoma's long history of debuting new ride concepts with Disney, that doesn't seem to be what happened.
Superman The Ride opened less than a year after Rock 'n' Rollercoaster. That means Premier Parks bought it while Rock 'n' Rollercoaster was still under construction. It is a lot of ifs for Disney to commission a layout, not involve themselves and not retain ownership of the design even if just for a limited period of time.
 

DreamfinderGuy

Well-Known Member
I don’t understand why this would take so long, other than artifical delays or pure laziness on Disney’s part. They could easily have the Gravity Building, Track, and structural overhaul of UoE done by this time next year. Then give about six months for T&A, prop installation, etc. No reason why this shouldn’t be a Summer 2020 opening
 

Edward Jackson

Well-Known Member
I don’t understand why this would take so long, other than artifical delays or pure laziness on Disney’s part. They could easily have the Gravity Building, Track, and structural overhaul of UoE done by this time next year. Then give about six months for T&A, prop installation, etc. No reason why this shouldn’t be a Summer 2020 opening
I agree with you. It seems like they are just trying to space out the openings of the new rides, along with timing them with the
upcoming celebrations.
 
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