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Do you think we could see 1 day ticket prices at $200 bucks before long?

scorp16

Well-Known Member
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It's amazing looking at both ends of the spectrum.

One one hand you have a one day ticket and a Disney After Hours option that would run you about $230 combined....so that you can be in the park with reduced crowds (at least for a few hours) and can enjoy minimal to no wait times.

On the other........$219 let's you experience an utterly chaotic scene.
 

aliceismad

Well-Known Member
Crazy, right?! The 1st "seasonal" AP I remember paying for was ~$129.
If you look at it that way, sure. But honestly, no, I don’t think it’s crazy. People spend that much for a single concert, a single baseball ticket, a single cruise excursion, etc. There are certainly many, many cheaper things than Disney, but the ticket prices don’t surprise me at all.
 

larryz

Well-Worn Member
Premium Member
So if I'm reading correctly with this new increase one day admission runs from about 115.00- 150.00 depending on the time of year you go. lol, I remember the freaky melt down when tickets hit 100.00 bucks.

Anyway just considering the one day ticket because we know the more days you go the lower the price each day averages out to, do you think by the 50th anniversary celebration kicks in, we'll start seeing the prices creep up to 200 bucks a ticket?

Do you think that would kill the proverbial goose that laid the golden egg?
I give it two years days, at the most.
 

aliceismad

Well-Known Member
It's amazing looking at both ends of the spectrum.

One one hand you have a one day ticket and a Disney After Hours option that would run you about $230 combined....so that you can be in the park with reduced crowds (at least for a few hours) and can enjoy minimal to no wait times.

On the other........$219 let's you experience an utterly chaotic scene.
Do you need a regular ticket for DAH? It was my understanding that DAH is like the holiday parties. No other ticket required for entry, and you can enter the park at 7 pm.
 

thomas998

Well-Known Member
A 1-day parkhopper is already $200. (OK, $199 plus tax at the most expensive times.)

A 1-day, 2-park ticket at Universal is $169 plus tax ($164 for kids). I'm not at all surprised to see Disney surpass that.
Just throw in the parking and your over 200.
 

Trackmaster

Well-Known Member
Where did you get this idea? Lots of people buy one day tickets.
Wow, interesting. I don't have any way of looking at the official stats, so I don't doubt you. I just know that I'd be pretty ****ed if I was paying $130 per head (so let's say $600 just to get in the door for a family of 5) just to get on 4-5 rides in a day. The only way I make Disney work is by going a lot in few hour bursts. I think that the only way to make Disney work is go for several days, or many visits over a year for a few hours apiece, so that you can maximize your FP+ rides. Paying that much for a one day ticket would make me think that every minute was precious and I'd be paranoid the whole time. Disney is definitely meant to be experienced over a longer period of time.
 

epcotisbest

Well-Known Member
Wow, interesting. I don't have any way of looking at the official stats, so I don't doubt you. I just know that I'd be pretty ****ed if I was paying $130 per head (so let's say $600 just to get in the door for a family of 5) just to get on 4-5 rides in a day. The only way I make Disney work is by going a lot in few hour bursts. I think that the only way to make Disney work is go for several days, or many visits over a year for a few hours apiece, so that you can maximize your FP+ rides. Paying that much for a one day ticket would make me think that every minute was precious and I'd be paranoid the whole time. Disney is definitely meant to be experienced over a longer period of time.
Our last four trips have been one day tickets only, or no tickets, just resort stays, and we have friends who do the same. We have gone specifically for one day to the Flower and Garden Festival several times. Some repeat visitors still enjoy visiting the resorts but don't spend their whole trip in the parks, so multi day tickets don't work for them.
People do go to the other Orlando theme arks as a destination, but might want to visit a Disney park for a day or two as well.
People who go for special events like Run Disney also don't need multi day tickets if they are only there for a limited time.
Another thing is Florida is a big vacation destination. Lots of places there to visit other than WDW. Every time we go to the beach, east or west coast, we meet people who are headed over to WDW for one day because they are in driving distance from whatever beach they may be visiting and want to take advantage of the relative proximity to WDW, but won't be spending multiple days there. We have also made one day trips to WDW from a few different beaches.
 

eliza61nyc

Well-Known Member
Original Poster
Wow, interesting. I don't have any way of looking at the official stats, so I don't doubt you. I just know that I'd be pretty ****ed if I was paying $130 per head (so let's say $600 just to get in the door for a family of 5) just to get on 4-5 rides in a day. The only way I make Disney work is by going a lot in few hour bursts. I think that the only way to make Disney work is go for several days, or many visits over a year for a few hours apiece, so that you can maximize your FP+ rides. Paying that much for a one day ticket would make me think that every minute was precious and I'd be paranoid the whole time. Disney is definitely meant to be experienced over a longer period of time.
I think one of the things I love about Disney is that a lot of my enjoyment is not from rides. Now I probably would not do that with kids but if I was in town for only a few days I would definitely pop over to MK or Epcot and just meander. Maybe I'd wait in one or two lines but pretty much I'd just relax and wander.

Let me add though that when you know you're coming back for a longer time you may have a different mindset.
 

Almac97

Member
A one day ticket is the most popular ticket.
I'm sure that is, but I'd also be willing to bet that it's still not a high percentage of overall ticket sales. If you grouped the multi-day ticketers, I'd bet they far outweigh the single day. It's just that when breaking out the multi-day people into their respective 2-day, 3-day...10-day...etc. columns, that 1-day is the highest on the bar chart.
 

Chef Mickey

Well-Known Member
Where did you get this idea? Lots of people buy one day tickets.
Then they're doing it wrong. Makes no sense. I'd also like to see the data on ticket breakout. The multi-day ticket (anything greater than 1 day) in general is overwhelmingly more popular, I'd wager.
 

Chef Mickey

Well-Known Member
If I'm Disney and 1 day tickets are indeed the most popular (more than all multi-day combined), I make 1 day ticket prices $200, today.

If you stay 2 days, the price can stay whatever it is today.

Disney has to hit you hard if you're only staying 1 day. Makes complete sense. I still don't believe 1 day tickets are anywhere close to the multi-day tickets. Meaning, my guess is over 75% of travelers stay longer than 1 day at WDW.
 
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Trackmaster

Well-Known Member
Our last four trips have been one day tickets only, or no tickets, just resort stays, and we have friends who do the same. We have gone specifically for one day to the Flower and Garden Festival several times. Some repeat visitors still enjoy visiting the resorts but don't spend their whole trip in the parks, so multi day tickets don't work for them.
People do go to the other Orlando theme arks as a destination, but might want to visit a Disney park for a day or two as well.
People who go for special events like Run Disney also don't need multi day tickets if they are only there for a limited time.
Another thing is Florida is a big vacation destination. Lots of places there to visit other than WDW. Every time we go to the beach, east or west coast, we meet people who are headed over to WDW for one day because they are in driving distance from whatever beach they may be visiting and want to take advantage of the relative proximity to WDW, but won't be spending multiple days there. We have also made one day trips to WDW from a few different beaches.
Yes, "snow birds" we call them. But Orlando is probably the one part of Florida that actually gets tourism in the summer too.
 

Trackmaster

Well-Known Member
Guests using 1-day tickets account for less than 10% of attendance on any given day. (I've heard 8 or 9%, depending on who I ask.)

The most popular tickets are 3-, 4-, and 5-day tickets. Not sure about whether it includes the park hop option.
That's what I thought. If you're close enough to Disney, you live in Florida and have an AP. If you're far enough away from Disney, you'll be spending enough time there to justify the air travel or drive, so you cash in on the multi-day discounts. The 8-9% remaining are for the casual guest who just stops in to see what its all about to knock it off their bucket list. They probably say "Why in the world would I pay $120 per person to wait in hour lines and ride 3-4 rides?" and never come back. Hence why you keep seeing the multi-day and AP guests coming back again and again. Disney is just so much better when you have multiple cracks at it. You never know when one day will really hit and you'll be able to do everything.
 
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