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News Disney to launch new Vacation Planning site to help guests with date-based tickets

CaptainAmerica

Premium Member
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Would you really bet on a price reduction? Would you advise someone to wait to buy their tickets? I think if they're lucky, the prices will stay the same for early Dec.
I expect prices to go up on average. If someone is planning a trip for "some time" in 2019, I think they should buy them now. If someone is going during a low-demand time, yes I'd advise them to wait.
 

mightynine

Active Member
If I'm understanding this right, this is just removing the "tickets must be used by whatever date" I would see when buying tickets and adding another charge if I want to make the dates "float"?
 

MickeyMinnieMom

Well-Known Member
Because if you end up with a cheaper season start option with an expensive season ticket, you don't get money back. If you get the cheap ticket you just pay the difference, according to the site.
I was assuming one would actually know their dates before buying. If not, that obviously makes sense. :)
 
I would be surprised if there are price reductions. The slow times will just get promoted to DVC, Florida Residents, and for pass holders to bring non-pass holders so they can protect their pricing. They can really fine tune the seasonality now.
 
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CaptainAmerica

Premium Member
True but they will somehow make sure, in the end, the house wins.
Of course. But the main advantage that Disney is getting here isn't on the revenue side, it's on the cost side. This model is going to generate extremely valuable data for Disney in terms of projecting attendance / crowd levels, allowing them to really pinpoint staffing requirements. Right now, Disney has loads of data on the behavior of their on-property guests but off-property guests are a bit of a black hole. This model fills in that black hole.

I would be surprised if there are price reductions. The slow times will just get promoted to DVC, Florida Residents, and for pass holders to bring non-pass holders so they can protect their pricing. They can really fine tune the seasonality now.
They already do that with blockout dates and targeted discounts. This has nothing to do with it. Those levers aren't significant enough to move the needle.
 

CJR

Well-Known Member
I would be surprised if there are price reductions. The slow times will just get promoted to DVC, Florida Residents, and for pass holders to bring non-pass holders so they can protect their pricing. They can really fine tune the seasonality now.
Agreed. I expect the lowest prices to be what they are now and the highest prices to be way higher than they are now. Similar to the one-day tickets, when they rolled out that process.
 

CaptainAmerica

Premium Member
Agreed. I expect the lowest prices to be what they are now and the highest prices to be way higher than they are now. Similar to the one-day tickets, when they rolled out that process.
I wish this forum had some kind of virtual currency that we could wager. I'd almost guarantee that a five day Park Hopper for September 9 - 13, 2019 will be less than $458.33, which is the current after-tax price for a 5-day hopper on Undercover Tourist.

You're conceding two things that Disney wants. 1) You're giving up flexibility (which will now be billed at $100 extra) and 2) you're committing to visiting during a slow time. We'll know in a few weeks I guess.

EDIT: Think about it... if the "base" slow season price wasn't decreasing from the current flexible price, the new $100 flexibility option would push the price of a 5-day hopper from $458.33 to $558.33. There's no chance that they have the stones to introduce a >20% price increase in one year.
 

Disney Dad 3000

Well-Known Member
Of course. But the main advantage that Disney is getting here isn't on the revenue side, it's on the cost side. This model is going to generate extremely valuable data for Disney in terms of projecting attendance / crowd levels, allowing them to really pinpoint staffing requirements. Right now, Disney has loads of data on the behavior of their on-property guests but off-property guests are a bit of a black hole. This model fills in that black hole.


They already do that with blockout dates and targeted discounts. This has nothing to do with it. Those levers aren't significant enough to move the needle.
Exactly.
What struck me was the timelines you have to use these tickets. If you are hitting multiple theme parks in FL on an extended trip, you better plan really well if you are only getting a 2-3 day pass. No more 14 day window for you.
Essentially if you aren't spending your whole vacation with us, Come in and then get out as we have another batch of ticket holders to get in. There won't be much disney doesn't know about where/when you'll be at their parks.
 

CaptainAmerica

Premium Member
Exactly.
What struck me was the timelines you have to use these tickets. If you are hitting multiple theme parks in FL on an extended trip, you better plan really well if you are only getting a 2-3 day pass. No more 14 day window for you.
Essentially if you aren't spending your whole vacation with us, Come in and then get out as we have another batch of ticket holders to get in. There won't be much disney doesn't know about where/when you'll be at their parks.
Practically nobody visits for 14 days except UK guests, and I imagine they'll have a different system.
 

Disney Dad 3000

Well-Known Member
Practically nobody visits for 14 days except UK guests, and I imagine they'll have a different system.
Oh I don't disagree with that. We've had AP the last few years that we let expire. Just thinking if we do decide to go back, would be nice to have at least a weeks worth of time to use a 2-3 day pass if that's all we wanted in the parks.
 
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