Coronavirus and Walt Disney World general discussion

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Angel Ariel

Well-Known Member
I hate that about that your friends son. I hope he improves. But for some reason I thought those pills were supposed to keep people out of the hospital. Or did I read that wrong?
The son is in the hospital for reasons related to his condition.

Many children here have not been vaccinated, and of those who have been, booster rates are poor. In my specific county, while vaccine rates for 12-15 are 94%, and 98% for 16-17 y/o, the rate for 5-11 y/o is only 59%. Booster rates are 30% and 44% for 12-15 and 16-17 respectively.
 

Lilofan

Well-Known Member
a friend of mine’s son went to the ER last night. He has a rare, eventually terminal condition. High level of need. The wait in the Children’s Hospital ER was 10 hours. They were admitted last night, but he is currently still in the ER because there are no beds in the hospital for her child yet. Most of the ER was covid cases. Nurses and Doctors telling her it’s been like this since before spring break (which was a few weeks after mask mandates lifted here).

They are overwhelmed and having difficulties providing necessary care to extremely vulnerable kids, like hers. And those same doctors and nurses are just at a point of feeling defeated as they tell her they recognize that people just don’t care about covid anymore and want to go on with their lives. It’s frustrating to see everyone say there’s no real impact anymore, everyone will just get it and let’s move on, while *seeing* the impact it’s having.
Prayers to your friend’s son. My loved one has been in the hospital for over 4 weeks now , I visit everyday, non Covid related but for a week the Covid cases rose and the hospital changed visitation to only one at a time , but recently changed to two visitors at a time during visit hours. Yes waits in ER sometimes in a bed in the ER hallway in my area can be 2-3 days at times to get into a regular hospital bed area due to hospital being full house. One tidbit I learned from the RNs was Easter had an overflow of patients in the ER. I asked why. I was told a number of the patients had issues with heart , didn’t get to to the ER and just dealt with symptoms. When Easter came around, the stress of the holiday overwhelmed them and a number were rushed to the ER on that Sunday.
 
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Touchdown

Well-Known Member
a friend of mine’s son went to the ER last night. He has a rare, eventually terminal condition. High level of need. The wait in the Children’s Hospital ER was 10 hours. They were admitted last night, but he is currently still in the ER because there are no beds in the hospital for her child yet. Most of the ER was covid cases. Nurses and Doctors telling her it’s been like this since before spring break (which was a few weeks after mask mandates lifted here).

They are overwhelmed and having difficulties providing necessary care to extremely vulnerable kids, like hers. And those same doctors and nurses are just at a point of feeling defeated as they tell her they recognize that people just don’t care about covid anymore and want to go on with their lives. It’s frustrating to see everyone say there’s no real impact anymore, everyone will just get it and let’s move on, while *seeing* the impact it’s having.
It’s not Covid directly that’s doing this though, the loss of staff from the pandemic along with people being a whole more hesitant to seek care has caused severely understaffed hospitals to be treating far sicker patients. But it’s not because of Covid pts taking beds anymore, their numbers remain low.
 

Angel Ariel

Well-Known Member
It’s not Covid directly that’s doing this though, the loss of staff from the pandemic along with people being a whole more hesitant to seek care has caused severely understaffed hospitals to be treating far sicker patients. But it’s not because of Covid pts taking beds anymore, their numbers remain low.
We are actually not in what the cdc considers low numbers anymore, as their new metrics are in part based on hospitalizations. We are in medium, and rising.

And loss of staff from the pandemic is still a direct result of the pandemic..and the more the remaining staff continue to deal with numbers in overwhelm, the worse this issue will get for the children who can’t get admitted when they need to be.
 

Touchdown

Well-Known Member
We are actually not in what the cdc considers low numbers anymore, as their new metrics are in part based on hospitalizations. We are in medium, and rising.

And loss of staff from the pandemic is still a direct result of the pandemic..and the more the remaining staff continue to deal with numbers in overwhelm, the worse this issue will get for the children who can’t get admitted when they need to be.
I was speaking of my personal experience in Wisconsin. We barely have any Covid pts at my hospital but are understaffed and having huge issue with pt throughput.
 

Angel Ariel

Well-Known Member
I was speaking of my personal experience in Wisconsin. We barely have any Covid pts at my hospital but are understaffed and having huge issue with pt throughput.
If you’re speaking for yourself and your area, then I politely request not quoting me and responding with “it’s not covid that’s doing this directly, though” as it comes across as a comment on what I shared about my area.
 

The Mom

Moderator
Premium Member
This is not helping with the nursing shortage.

I always knew that an error I made could get me fired, lose my license, get me sued, or all three. Along with haunting my conscience for the rest of my life. But I never had to face the possibility of also going to prison.
 

Heelz2315

Well-Known Member
Orange Co Fl is still in the low/green category. It won’t be long before they’re yellow/medium then red/high.

Wonder how WDW will react? It may be they do nothing unless Demings reacts. Granted there’s no national mandate, the last one was the transportation one. That’s gone.
 

Touchdown

Well-Known Member
If you’re speaking for yourself and your area, then I politely request not quoting me and responding with “it’s not covid that’s doing this directly, though” as it comes across as a comment on what I shared about my area.
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My experience is similar to what we are experiencing nationwide. We are no where near the peaks seen earlier in the pandemic.
 

Nubs70

Well-Known Member
This is not helping with the nursing shortage.

I always knew that an error I made could get me fired, lose my license, get me sued, or all three. Along with haunting my conscience for the rest of my life. But I never had to face the possibility of also going to prison.
Another issue with amount of nurses is that, for RN BSN admissions, you need a higher GPA than what is required for medical school.
 

Touchdown

Well-Known Member
Nobody said we are near the peaks, but the chart you just posted clearly shows the line moving back up. Obviously some areas of the country will be affected differently than others.
While it’s going up it’s so low that there are only 2 times in the last 1.5 years it’s been lower (a few months ago and summer 2021. Ergo hospitalizations are still relatively low.
 

DisneyCane

Well-Known Member
This is not helping with the nursing shortage.

I always knew that an error I made could get me fired, lose my license, get me sued, or all three. Along with haunting my conscience for the rest of my life. But I never had to face the possibility of also going to prison.
Her mistake crossed WAY over the line into negligence and in my opinion was criminal negligence. The drug she was supposed to give comes in liquid form and the vial has a silver cap. The drug she administered not only comes in a much larger vial, it is in powder form that needs to be mixed with saline and the cap is red with "WARNING PARALYTIC AGENT" written on it.

Her case should not be an example to dissuade people form going into nursing.
 

Lilofan

Well-Known Member
This is not helping with the nursing shortage.

I always knew that an error I made could get me fired, lose my license, get me sued, or all three. Along with haunting my conscience for the rest of my life. But I never had to face the possibility of also going to prison.
I have family and friends who are doctors and RNs. Getting sued ( more than 1x ) is very common in the medical industry.
 

Angel Ariel

Well-Known Member
Her mistake crossed WAY over the line into negligence and in my opinion was criminal negligence. The drug she was supposed to give comes in liquid form and the vial has a silver cap. The drug she administered not only comes in a much larger vial, it is in powder form that needs to be mixed with saline and the cap is red with "WARNING PARALYTIC AGENT" written on it.

Her case should not be an example to dissuade people form going into nursing.
Whether you agree with this example or not, fear of prosecution and lawsuits is absolutely impacting peoples decision to remain in nursing.

A very good friend of mine recently left bedside nursing for this very reason. Her hospital did not have the staffing to safely serve patients according to appropriate ratios (she was in labor and delivery), which makes the likelihood of something going wrong incredibly high, regardless of how amazing of a nurse they are.
 

Vegas Disney Fan

Well-Known Member
I’ve been testing negative since Wednesday and all my “allergy” symptoms are finally gone too. I have several friends who had bad “allergies” at the same time so we’re wondering if they had it too, the upside of Omicron being a milder strain (in general) is fewer very sick people but the downside is it’s easily mistaken for other ailments so who knows what the real cases are.

Cases here are creeping up but still a tiny fraction of what they were, worth keeping an eye on though.

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