Politics Coronavirus and Walt Disney World general discussion

This thread contains political discussion related to the original thread topic

DCBaker

Premium Member
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Numbers are out - there were 50 new reported deaths.

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Disstevefan1

Well-Known Member
Working as an RN in Wisconsin this is complete crap and is dumbfounding its even posted and stays up. God help us.

To the moderator, feel free to take the post down, I was just reporting what was told to me by a RN. I made no leading questions, it was told to me. I had heard of this and it surprised me to hear it from a RN working there.
 

GoofGoof

Premium Member
To the moderator, feel free to take the post down, I was just reporting what was told to me by a RN. I made no leading questions, it was told to me. I had heard of this and it surprised me to hear it from a RN working there.
RNs are people too. It’s likely they heard that from the same social media sources people here have. I don’t know the ins and outs of every hospital but the RNs I know aren’t involved in hospital billing and don‘t typically have a say in what the cause of death is on a death certificate. How many Disney CMs parrot what they read here despite having no actual inside information on future rides or other park changes? Happens all the time.
 

Jwink

Well-Known Member
Well...”end”
Is extreme...

But I think the fear is that they no longer operate as “mass” destinations...and complaints aside -every fan LIKES it that way (they just don’t know it).

Limited attendance, reservation only will gut the feel. It would never be the same. No matter how much motivational speaking in the mirror sycophants listen to.
From what I’ve heard the reservation system is permanent. We don’t like it because there were so many times we’d on a whim decided to head to Epcot for the evening
 

LUVMCO

Well-Known Member
I have a friend here in Ohio that just went back to RN after taking time off to bring up 4 kids. She has pretty much said the same thing as @Disstevefan1 said. She is a little disillusioned to say the least. Yes, God help us.
I personally have not seen that where I work. I have heard stories from nurses that worked in NYC back in March\ April that this was possibly going on. I'm not sure if it was intentional. They were just very overwhelmed. The inner city NYC hospitals are not the best.

I've seen people admitted with Covid that in my opinion didn't need to be admitted, but I could say that about other admissions too.
 

GoofGoof

Premium Member
Here’s a serious question on this hospital billing fraud theory. If the Covid cases and deaths in the US are grossly overstated due to financial incentives given by the government for hospitals how do we explain the worldwide pandemic? There are many countries who provide no economic incentive for hospitals or doctors reporting fake Covid cases. What incentive do they have for overstating their cases? Some times you have to take a step back and look at the whole picture.
 

GoofGoof

Premium Member
I've seen people admitted with Covid that in my opinion didn't need to be admitted, but I could say that about other admissions too.
I would think that’s more of a CYA for the hospitals. They don’t want to send someone home and then get sued if they die. I know that happens all the time anyway, but with the heightened focus on Covid I could see hospitals being over cautious especially because there are so many unknowns with Covid.
 

LUVMCO

Well-Known Member
Here’s a serious question on this hospital billing fraud theory. If the Covid cases and deaths in the US are grossly overstated due to financial incentives given by the government for hospitals how do we explain the worldwide pandemic? There are many countries who provide no economic incentive for hospitals or doctors reporting fake Covid cases. What incentive do they have for overstating their cases? Some times you have to take a step back and look at the whole picture.
There are people admitted that have multiple co-morbidities along with having Covid. I think that could be where it gets murky.
 

Kevin_W

Well-Known Member
From what I’ve heard the reservation system is permanent. We don’t like it because there were so many times we’d on a whim decided to head to Epcot for the evening
I'm sure it's lovely for Disney, but it's not great for guests. (though with y month ahead adr's, you often have essentially a park reservation).

Take yesterday, when Everest went down for the whole day. It was our only day with an AK reservation, so we don't get to ride it this trip. Nevermind the negative effect on the other rides in AK.
 

LUVMCO

Well-Known Member
I would think that’s more of a CYA for the hospitals. They don’t want to send someone home and then get sued if they die. I know that happens all the time anyway, but with the heightened focus on Covid I could see hospitals being over cautious especially because there are so many unknowns with Covid.
There's that, but some of them do keep the DOJ busy.
 

lazyboy97o

Well-Known Member
Here’s a serious question on this hospital billing fraud theory. If the Covid cases and deaths in the US are grossly overstated due to financial incentives given by the government for hospitals how do we explain the worldwide pandemic? There are many countries who provide no economic incentive for hospitals or doctors reporting fake Covid cases. What incentive do they have for overstating their cases? Some times you have to take a step back and look at the whole picture.
Nurses in hospitals work very hard but they’re also not the ones making decisions. These stories being “from“ nurses is perfect. They’re not actually involved in the widespread criminal activity they allegedly know about (but are also not reporting it) and are in a sort of revered position which means the story is not to be questioned.
 

TrainChasers

Well-Known Member
I'm sure it's lovely for Disney, but it's not great for guests. (though with y month ahead adr's, you often have essentially a park reservation).

Take yesterday, when Everest went down for the whole day. It was our only day with an AK reservation, so we don't get to ride it this trip. Nevermind the negative effect on the other rides in AK.
I like to check the weather the day of or the night before when planning which park to visit the next day. One of my favorite things at Disney is watching citizens of Hollywood, they don’t come out in the rain so I’ll spend a rainy day at MK or Epcot.
 

Heppenheimer

Well-Known Member
I would think that’s more of a CYA for the hospitals. They don’t want to send someone home and then get sued if they die. I know that happens all the time anyway, but with the heightened focus on Covid I could see hospitals being over cautious especially because there are so many unknowns with Covid.
It could just as easily go the other way, though. We now have enough experience to know that most people who catch COVID-19 can safely convalesce at home with only supportive treatment, and one of the best predictors if the patient will get into trouble with the disease are the vital signs when they first present. Knowing all the resources that a COVID patient will consume plus the fact that elective procedures have to stop once a hospital's COVID burden is too high, there's actually a pretty significant incentive not to admit.

But that's an individualized decision that needs to be made between the ER attending, hospitalist and bed manager.
 

GoofGoof

Premium Member
There are people admitted that have multiple co-morbidities along with having Covid. I think that could be where it gets murky.
I don’t disagree, but if someone is Covid positive and also has co-morbidities they still have Covid so the positive cases aren’t inflated. I agree it’s a grey area on deaths but that’s the case with most contagious diseases. The majority of people dying from the flu each year also have co-morbidities.
 

TrainChasers

Well-Known Member
I don’t disagree, but if someone is Covid positive and also has co-morbidities they still have Covid so the positive cases aren’t inflated. I agree it’s a grey area on deaths but that’s the case with most contagious diseases. The majority of people dying from the flu each year also have co-morbidities.
my understanding is that most cancer deaths are diseases that the body can’t fight off because of the cancer.
 

GoofGoof

Premium Member
It could just as easily go the other way, though. We now have enough experience to know that most people who catch COVID-19 can safely convalesce at home with only supportive treatment, and one of the best predictors if the patient will get into trouble with the disease are the vital signs when they first present. Knowing all the resources that a COVID patient will consume plus the fact that elective procedures have to stop once a hospital's COVID burden is too high, there's actually a pretty significant incentive not to admit.

But that's an individualized decision that needs to be made between the ER attending, hospitalist and bed manager.
For sure. In the beginning we knew so little I think the plan was to be overly cautious. In March/April around me most primary care doctors wouldn’t even see patients live in the office who potentially had Covid. Lots of people were told to go straight to the ER. Today we do know more and there’s probably less people being admitted.
 

oceanbreeze77

Well-Known Member
In the beginning there MAY have been mistakes, but rightfully so. In the Spring everyone was trapped underwater by frozen ice without an idea of what to do. Now we are at least treading with our heads over the water, its getting exhausting, but were at least breathing.
 

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