News Coronavirus and Walt Disney World general discussion

Disstevefan1

Well-Known Member
I have thought of something that may be screwing up the COVID data. For the daily positive numbers I think they are using the date the sample was processed NOT the day the sample was taken. If the labs take weeks to process the tests then post the results as a positive on the day it was processed, it may have been two weeks since the sample was taken. Just a thought.
 

wdisney9000

Well-Known Member
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We don't plan to go again until January 2021, but I agree. Of course, we're DVC owners with APs and we don't even do full days anymore. I think that our next trip will have a completely different feel after everything that has happened over the last few months.



I'd like to think that the silver lining of all this is getting rid of FP+.
FP+ was strictly to enhance the guest experience!! Remember, (according to the article posted here from Austin at Fast Company), how the "Founding Five" (which seemed like a sad/forced attempt to give the executives in charge of MM+ some type of legendary nickname, smh), felt emotional when thinking of the, "endless lines for rides, food, and bathrooms; parents juggling maps, hotel keys, baby carriages, and bottles of SPF 75; and kids pulling families on long treks to try to visit every attraction. The park was filled with complications, such as a tiered ticketing system with wonky rules" (direct quote from article). And let's be real, things have been more complicated than ever, even prior to covid. The tiered FP+ system only got wonkier over time, Securing certain dining reservations or FP+ had families online at midnight 180 days out just to be able to eat at BoG or ride FoP, Having to arrive at HS 3 hours before the sun rises just to hopefully get a chance to ride RoTR, and the list goes on. But ya, the "Founding Five" really "enhanced" everybody's experience, lol.

Or remember how Austin (the author of the article) spoke with the father carrying his sleeping princess in the elevator at Contemporary who said he didnt know what they would have done without FP+?!! What a crock.

And my personal favorite, the two senior citizens he spoke with that were worried about the difficulty of using an app on a smart phone but they absolutely loved it, smh.

Billions spent on a system that has not improved wait times, dining reservations, or even the ability to unlock your resort room door with a magic band. But hey, certain people no longer have to be at the park before 11 am to ride specific attractions.....unless it's in Galaxy's Edge and you gotta be up at 5 am. Magikal! More magikal than the company actually spending that money to increase attraction capacity that could actually enhance your experience. But yes, I know.... something , something , something infrastructure! Thanks Meg!!!
 

Chi84

Premium Member
FP+ was strictly to enhance the guest experience!! Remember, (according to the article posted here from Austin at Fast Company), how the "Founding Five" (which seemed like a sad/forced attempt to give the executives in charge of MM+ some type of legendary nickname, smh), felt emotional when thinking of the, "endless lines for rides, food, and bathrooms; parents juggling maps, hotel keys, baby carriages, and bottles of SPF 75; and kids pulling families on long treks to try to visit every attraction. The park was filled with complications, such as a tiered ticketing system with wonky rules" (direct quote from article). And let's be real, things have been more complicated than ever, even prior to covid. The tiered FP+ system only got wonkier over time, Securing certain dining reservations or FP+ had families online at midnight 180 days out just to be able to eat at BoG or ride FoP, Having to arrive at HS 3 hours before the sun rises just to hopefully get a chance to ride RoTR, and the list goes on. But ya, the "Founding Five" really "enhanced" everybody's experience, lol.

Or remember how Austin (the author of the article) spoke with the father carrying his sleeping princess in the elevator at Contemporary who said he didnt know what they would have done without FP+?!! What a crock.

And my personal favorite, the two senior citizens he spoke with that were worried about the difficulty of using an app on a smart phone but they absolutely loved it, smh.

Billions spent on a system that has not improved wait times, dining reservations, or even the ability to unlock your resort room door with a magic band. But hey, certain people no longer have to be at the park before 11 am to ride specific attractions.....unless it's in Galaxy's Edge and you gotta be up at 5 am. Magikal! More magikal than the company actually spending that money to increase attraction capacity that could actually enhance your experience. But yes, I know.... something , something , something infrastructure! Thanks Meg!!!
FP+ is great and it’s not that hard to use . . .
 

BrerWayne

Well-Known Member
FP+ was strictly to enhance the guest experience!! Remember, (according to the article posted here from Austin at Fast Company), how the "Founding Five" (which seemed like a sad/forced attempt to give the executives in charge of MM+ some type of legendary nickname, smh), felt emotional when thinking of the, "endless lines for rides, food, and bathrooms; parents juggling maps, hotel keys, baby carriages, and bottles of SPF 75; and kids pulling families on long treks to try to visit every attraction. The park was filled with complications, such as a tiered ticketing system with wonky rules" (direct quote from article). And let's be real, things have been more complicated than ever, even prior to covid. The tiered FP+ system only got wonkier over time, Securing certain dining reservations or FP+ had families online at midnight 180 days out just to be able to eat at BoG or ride FoP, Having to arrive at HS 3 hours before the sun rises just to hopefully get a chance to ride RoTR, and the list goes on. But ya, the "Founding Five" really "enhanced" everybody's experience, lol.

Or remember how Austin (the author of the article) spoke with the father carrying his sleeping princess in the elevator at Contemporary who said he didnt know what they would have done without FP+?!! What a crock.

And my personal favorite, the two senior citizens he spoke with that were worried about the difficulty of using an app on a smart phone but they absolutely loved it, smh.

Billions spent on a system that has not improved wait times, dining reservations, or even the ability to unlock your resort room door with a magic band. But hey, certain people no longer have to be at the park before 11 am to ride specific attractions.....unless it's in Galaxy's Edge and you gotta be up at 5 am. Magikal! More magikal than the company actually spending that money to increase attraction capacity that could actually enhance your experience. But yes, I know.... something , something , something infrastructure! Thanks Meg!!!
Exactly. Fastpass has also created long standby lines for attractions which rarely had lines or minimal lines at best. On my last trip we waited in line for things like the Magic Carpets, Imagination, and Philharmagic. Things that you could usually walk right on to. I would like to see an experiment done for a couple of weeks where everything went completely standby like in the old days and see what the average wait times are. ( I know it will never happen).
PS When are you gonna finish your trip report?
 

Animaniac93-98

Well-Known Member
Setting your alarm 60 days before your vacation and hoping you get a chance to ride an e ticket is “great” ?

Vs. the legacy fastpass when you walked into the park and could get a day of fast pass for any attraction in the first few hours of operation?

Maxpass seems like the best of both worlds to me.
It's telling that since FP+ was introduced, most other Disney parks have simply moved to a pay extra option you use on a day of choice.
 

Chi84

Premium Member
Setting your alarm 60 days before your vacation and hoping you get a chance to ride an e ticket is “great” ?

Vs. the legacy fastpass when you walked into the park and could get a day of fast pass for any attraction in the first few hours of operation?

Maxpass seems like the best of both worlds to me.
I don’t get up that early and I’ve never had a problem. Legacy FastPass was okay, but we usually visit the parks in the afternoon and FastPasses for the good rides were gone by then.
 

Chi84

Premium Member
Waits averaging 20 - 45 minutes for everyone most of the year would be great.
Walking up and getting on the ride in just a few minutes is better for us. I know different systems work better for different people. With FP+, Disney happened to hit on a system that works perfectly for us. If Disney changes it, we would be sad but would adapt. You can be flexible and adapt to change or write novels about the past. The former works better for us.
 

Tom P.

Well-Known Member
Setting your alarm 60 days before your vacation and hoping you get a chance to ride an e ticket is “great” ?

Vs. the legacy fastpass when you walked into the park and could get a day of fast pass for any attraction in the first few hours of operation?

Maxpass seems like the best of both worlds to me.
I would much rather plan my FastPass selections 60 days out than have to be in the park early in the day to get legacy FastPass selections.

To each his own.
 

trojanjustin

Well-Known Member
Walking up and getting on the ride in just a few minutes is better for us. I know different systems work better for different people. With FP+, Disney happened to hit on a system that works perfectly for us. If Disney changes it, we would be sad but would adapt. You can be flexible and adapt to change or write novels about the past. The former works better for us.
Have you been to DL and used MaxPass? It's 1000x better.
 

Kevin_W

Well-Known Member
It's part of one of the company's biggest blunders that has never delivered on what it was ultimately promised to do (increase revenue by x % and reduce the need to invest in the parks).

That some Disney fans are OK with making ride reservations 60 days out does not mean it was a success.
On the other hand, have you seen what revenue per person has done since FP+ was introduced? Now there have been a bunch of other changes (read: upcharges) since then as well so it's hard to track what's from what, but they definitely have succeeded at increasing guest spending.
 

Animaniac93-98

Well-Known Member
On the other hand, have you seen what revenue per person has done since FP+ was introduced? Now there have been a bunch of other changes (read: upcharges) since then as well so it's hard to track what's from what, but they definitely have succeeded at increasing guest spending.
Is that directly related to FP+ or the across the board increases in prices on everything and the introduction of more extra pay options?

NextGen was supposed to have a series of extra charge options tied directly to it, but so far it's just been collectible Magic Bands and the bandits.
 

Chi84

Premium Member
Have you been to DL and used MaxPass? It's 1000x better.
No. Our Disney vacations are all at WDW. We generally go to the water parks in the mornings or spend the day at the pool, then get to the parks around 4:00 or later. Would MaxPass work for us? There are some days we visit 2 parks on the same day, but I can generally plan things so we get to ride whatever we like. We have been able to get additional FastPasses without too much trouble.
 
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Animaniac93-98

Well-Known Member
It's part of one of the company's biggest blunders that has never delivered on what it was ultimately promised to do (increase revenue by x % and reduce the need to invest in the parks).
Following up on this point, the IT upgrades provided by NextGen were needed, but the idea of turning that into a broader marketing/sales tool that would ALSO reduce the need to invest in other aspects of the parks experience was always insane. That management bought into this grand scheme showed their lack of understanding about the park's core product.

I think as they spent more and more money on it, it became even more of a sunk cost fallacy for management.
 

SugarMagnolia75

Active Member
FP+ is great and it’s not that hard to use . . .
It's yield management.

It's telling that since FP+ was introduced, most other Disney parks have simply moved to a pay extra option you use on a day of choice.
And I wonder if Disney would use this as an opportunity to introduce something similar to MaxPass to limit physical interactions and then start charging for it.

I don’t get up that early and I’ve never had a problem. Legacy FastPass was okay, but we usually visit the parks in the afternoon and FastPasses for the good rides were gone by then.
We took a lot of short trips over the past year. On most of those trips it was extremely difficult to get FP for some of the headliners. With the exception of Epcot, at least one ride was always unavailable 60 days out. Oddly enough, we had very few issues with using FP at Disneyland and most of the standby lines are quite manageable.
 

lazyboy97o

Well-Known Member
On the other hand, have you seen what revenue per person has done since FP+ was introduced? Now there have been a bunch of other changes (read: upcharges) since then as well so it's hard to track what's from what, but they definitely have succeeded at increasing guest spending.
They’re having to build new attractions like Ratatouille and TRON. MyMagic+ failed.
 
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