News Bob Iger is back! Chapek is out!!

UNCgolf

Well-Known Member
I disagree with you strongly here.

I think a CEO’s primary responsibility is shareholder value.

The problem as I see it is stock based compensation.

I want the CEO of Disney focused on its value today while taking the steps to insure that value 25 years from now.

Iger only cares about the next 10-q and that leads to long term destruction of value for the shareholder.

The problem is that value 25 years from now is irrelevant to many (if not most) major shareholders. As long as value is maximized in the short term they couldn't care less if it guaranteed the company will be bankrupt in 15 years.
 

Sirwalterraleigh

Premium Member
I disagree with you strongly here.

I think a CEO’s primary responsibility is shareholder value.

The problem as I see it is stock based compensation.

I want the CEO of Disney focused on its value today while taking the steps to insure that value 25 years from now.

Iger only cares about the next 10-q and that leads to long term destruction of value for the shareholder.

Disney’s primary stock value is moderation
And consistency…it’s not what you retire on. You keep it…it makes you money in the long game.

Because they can’t reinvest into the product the way needed if they have more profit concerns.

It’s their strength AND their weakness.
 
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Sirwalterraleigh

Premium Member
The problem is that value 25 years from now is irrelevant to many (if not most) major shareholders. As long as value is maximized in the short term they couldn't care less if it guaranteed the company will be bankrupt in 15 years.
And that’s what Bob has allowed the door open too…
People underestimate just how important Roy was as the gatekeeper
 

Trauma

Well-Known Member
Disney’s primary stock value is moderation A
And consistency…it’s not what you retire on. You keep it…it makes you money in the long game.

Because they can’t reinvest into the product the way needed if they have more profit concerns.

It’s their strength AND their weakness.
Quality companies are exactly what you retire on.

I will probably never sell Costco. That will get passed down.

If Disney can’t find ways to invest capital effectively they can return value to the shareholders.

Let’s be honest we both know Disney isn’t investing capitol appropriately for the long term good of the company.
 

Lilofan

Well-Known Member
I disagree with you strongly here.

I think a CEO’s primary responsibility is shareholder value.

The problem as I see it is stock based compensation.

I want the CEO of Disney focused on its value today while taking the steps to insure that value 25 years from now.

Iger only cares about the next 10-q and that leads to long term destruction of value for the shareholder.
Where is the outrage of the shareholders ? Definitely not asking tough open questions during Q&A to Iger at shareholder meetings. Chapek tried though to wine and dine the shareholders when he met with them at the most luxurious upscale resort where they all stayed at WDW - Four Seasons WDW shortly before he got canned.
 

Sirwalterraleigh

Premium Member
Quality companies are exactly what you retire on.

I will probably never sell Costco. That will get passed down.

If Disney can’t find ways to invest capital effectively they can return value to the shareholders.

Let’s be honest we both know Disney isn’t investing capitol appropriately for the long term good of the company.
I agree about the investment…I’m saying the volatile pursuit of quick scores has changed the investment game entirely

And Disney can’t bridge the old reality they thrived in with the new

Hell…for decades their profits almost came exclusively from merchandise and cable tv ads…

…not really great businesses to be in the digi-world
 

Sirwalterraleigh

Premium Member
Where is the outrage of the shareholders ? Definitely not asking tough open questions during Q&A to Iger at shareholder meetings. Chapek tried though to wine and dine the shareholders when he met with them at the most luxurious upscale resort where they all stayed at WDW - Four Seasons WDW shortly before he got canned.
No shareholders are happy…

But this is why you don’t let the ceo appoint his board…there is no counter to that
 

UNCgolf

Well-Known Member
You shouldn’t buy a company that you don’t want to own for 10 years.

I'm not talking about individual shareholders -- they generally don't matter.

The ones pushing short-term value over any kind of long-term health are the large institutional ones who have far more power in forcing change. People like Nelson Peltz, for example. Again, they couldn't care less if the company is gone in 15 years if they're able to wring more return out of this year.
 
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Sirwalterraleigh

Premium Member
Why? More specifically, why is the collective value to employees, customers, and the community worth less than shareholders? A 51-49 split would be unacceptable?

I’m sure it’s a value judgement. But it has long-term consequences.
It’s just the world we live in…

And you know better than to think the employees, Anaheim and Orlando are more than a necessary evil/nuisance to them.

Been that way for a long time. 30 years minimum.
 

Sirwalterraleigh

Premium Member

Vegas Disney Fan

Well-Known Member
I want the CEO of Disney focused on its value today while taking the steps to insure that value 25 years from now.
It’s ironic this isn’t considered taking care of the share holders.

I’d think Disneys short term value would be propped up by its perceived long term value, a new ride may cost the investors a few cents of dividend this year but will guarantee millions of visitors through the gates for the foreseeable future, I’m not a finance guru but I’d rather have large long term gains over a small short term dividend.
 
In the Parks
No
Having finished DisneyWar, I can say with certainty that I would much rather have someone who worked under Eisner from 1984-1994 than 1994-2006. Staggs doesn't seem like a good pick for this in my opinion. I don't know who is, but I don't want anyone who was CFO to be the chief creative in the company. We need a chief creative! Bring back the Eisner/Wells dynamic. That's when Disney was at its best.

Heck, what's Jeffrey Katzenberg up to these days? ;)
 

Vegas Disney Fan

Well-Known Member
Having finished DisneyWar, I can say with certainty that I would much rather have someone who worked under Eisner from 1984-1994 than 1994-2006. Staggs doesn't seem like a good pick for this in my opinion. I don't know who is, but I don't want anyone who was CFO to be the chief creative in the company. We need a chief creative! Bring back the Eisner/Wells dynamic. That's when Disney was at its best.

Heck, what's Jeffrey Katzenberg up to these days? ;)
They only hire Bobs, so i vote for Bob Weiss.
 

MerlinTheGoat

Well-Known Member
Heck, what's Jeffrey Katzenberg up to these days? ;)
Somehow managing to make Iger look like a massively successful genius with his streaming services, compared to Katzenberg's own attempt...

Quibi-Logo.png


While I think burning bridges with Katzenberg WAS a mistake on Eisner's part, the real loss was all of the talented creatives that he took with him to create Dreamworks and establish it as a true competitor and massive threat to Disney.

From what i've heard, Katzenberg isn't actually particularly well liked even by people who fondly remember those renaissance years. He was competent when he surrounded himself with talented creatives. But even if he did have any talent of his own as an executive, it seems to be long gone at this point.
 
In the Parks
No
Somehow managing to make Iger look like a massively successful genius with his streaming services, compared to Katzenberg's own attempt...

Quibi-Logo.png


While I think burning bridges with Katzenberg WAS a mistake on Eisner's part, the real loss was all of the talented creatives that he took with him to create Dreamworks and establish it as a true competitor and massive threat to Disney.

From what i've heard, Katzenberg isn't actually particularly well liked even by people who fondly remember those renaissance years. He was competent when he surrounded himself with talented creatives. But even if he did have any talent of his own as an executive, it seems to be long gone at this point.
Yeah, I was mostly joking. In DisneyWar it was clear he got a raw deal, but I've also read The Men Who Would Be King (about the formation, rise and fall of DreamWorks), so I've seen what he can do on his own (plus there's the more contemporary example of Quibi). But I do think that if he were the Wells in the right pairing, that might work. But that's a big might.
 

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