Any Bets on What Comes After Galaxy's Edge?

ppete1975

Well-Known Member
I agree the show takes up a lot of space. I agree Disney should not touch the Muppets. I still hope someday Grand Avenue becomes a Muppets Studio area with more Muppets stuff.
a question Ive been asking myself is if they had built the muppet attractions specifically the great muppet movie ride, would this have saved the great movie ride (yin yang) or would it have also killed the great muppet movie ride, or would the great muppet movie ride survive and great movie ride closed.
And im in the minority that thinks it was the time for the great movie ride to close.
 

HMF

Well-Known Member
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Replacing the Echo Lake area would almost certainly make Hollywood Studios the worst park at Disney, no matter how good the area that replaces it is. The park would have very little theme remaining; it would just be a random collection of IPs.
It became a random collection of IP's when they took out the Great Movie Ride.
 

UNCgolf

Well-Known Member
The park has no theme anymore. it's theme was the magic of moviemaking and a studio and rather than sticking to that theme they have decided to turn it into a dumping ground for anything that doesn't fit anywhere else.

It does, although it's certainly not as strong as it used to be. The theme was golden age Hollywood combined with a working studio, and the whole park other than Toy Story Land and Galaxy's Edge (which are mostly hidden in the back and not visible from the main areas) still consists of those types of buildings. Tearing up Echo Lake would be the final death knell for that.
 

GrandCanyonConcourse

Well-Known Member
It does, although it's certainly not as strong as it used to be. The theme was golden age Hollywood combined with a working studio, and the whole park other than Toy Story Land and Galaxy's Edge (which are mostly hidden in the back and not visible from the main areas) still consists of those types of buildings. Tearing up Echo Lake would be the final death knell for that.
Instead of working studio the back is now themed to entering the worlds of those movies. Certainly better than the abandoned backlots and empty city facades.
 

egg

Well-Known Member
And according to some here, RnRC never fit the park cause it’s got nothing to do with movies! 🙄
 

Movielover

Well-Known Member
And according to some here, RnRC never fit the park cause it’s got nothing to do with movies! 🙄

Original MGM Studios was much more than just movies. You also had Superstar Television which delved into Television production. Then there was the Monster Sound Show which was replaced with Sounds Dangerous, Both of which went into how sound is created and used for effect. Tower of Tower is based on a television series. Then in 1999 the parking lot was modified and the section names were changed from Western, Comedy, Mystery, and Romance to Television, Stage, Film, and Music. It's not a stretch to see how RnRC would fit in being about music, especially since Areosmith songs have been used in countless of films.
 

MisterPenguin

Rumormonger
Premium Member
Original MGM Studios was much more than just movies. You also had Superstar Television which delved into Television production. Then there was the Monster Sound Show which was replaced with Sounds Dangerous, Both of which went into how sound is created and used for effect. Tower of Tower is based on a television series. Then in 1999 the parking lot was modified and the section names were changed from Western, Comedy, Mystery, and Romance to Television, Stage, Film, and Music. It's not a stretch to see how RnRC would fit in being about music, especially since Areosmith songs have been used in countless of films.

So... one can say it was almost as if it were a collection of IPs!

;)
 

egg

Well-Known Member
Original MGM Studios was much more than just movies. You also had Superstar Television which delved into Television production. Then there was the Monster Sound Show which was replaced with Sounds Dangerous, Both of which went into how sound is created and used for effect. Tower of Tower is based on a television series. Then in 1999 the parking lot was modified and the section names were changed from Western, Comedy, Mystery, and Romance to Television, Stage, Film, and Music. It's not a stretch to see how RnRC would fit in being about music, especially since Areosmith songs have been used in countless of films.

Oh I absolutely agree, and very well said. My point before was a sarcastic one in that I don’t think many understand it like you do.
 

Movielover

Well-Known Member
Oh I absolutely agree, and very well said. My point before was a sarcastic one in that I don’t think many understand it like you do.
Thanks, my response was aimed more to them than directly to you so sorry if it came off that way. There's just so much more to this park than most give credit to. The detail and thought put into the references and nods to Hollywood were truly Disney level! I would kill to be able to visit in its opening year!
 

doctornick

Well-Known Member
The park has no theme anymore. it's theme was the magic of moviemaking and a studio and rather than sticking to that theme they have decided to turn it into a dumping ground for anything that doesn't fit anywhere else.

Meh. I know it's an unpopular opinion around here, but "classic" Disney-MGM sucked. The park as it opened was awful and while it got better in the 90's with adding Sunset Blvd, it wasn't always IMHO the weakest of Disney's domestic parks outside of opening day DCA - and at least they addressed that.

The premise of a park that is about movie making and a working studio is pretty lame. It works for Universal Hollywood since that has the weight and mystique of decades of true classic moviemaking. For DHS (and Uni Florida) it's just another level of fake on top of a premise of being fake recreations. There's nothing wrong with celebrating film history or providing some information about movie production, but it's an awful idea for an entire park. It's like if Conservation station was the whole of DAK and they idea as just to see how animals were taken care of. Boring as a whole park, great as a compliment to other experiences.

I'm sorry but actually building lands that let you experience "going into a movie" as a compliment to other ways of showcasing the history of entertainment is a huge step forward for the park. I'm thrilled they are going that direction though I'd question how the execution (i.e. using Toy Story which is not the greatest environment and not building at least another land if not two). It would have been awesome to see something more like Cars Land as an addition.

Now, I don't disagree with the idea of a part of a theme park being themed to "classic" or "idealized" Hollywood. That's fine for an area and that's exactly what we will continue to have (even if Echo Lake changes) with Hollywood and Sunset. Outside of Pandora (which feels much more about a unique natural setting than "going into a movie"), there hasn't been any dedicated single IP lands in WDW, so I think going this way actually helps to distinguish thispark and strengthen the premise of DHS. YMMV.
 
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UNCgolf

Well-Known Member
Now, I don't disagree with the idea of a part of a theme park being themed to "classic" or "idealized" Hollywood. That's fine for an area and that's exactly what we will continue to have (even if Echo Lake changes) with Hollywood and Sunset. Outside of Pandora (which feels much more about a unique natural setting than "going into a movie"), there hasn't been any dedicated single IP lands in WDW, so I think going this way actually helps to distinguish and strengthen the premise of DHS. YMMV.

I think building any dedicated single IP land is a dangerous move long term. It's possible (maybe unlikely, but still possible) that in 25 years, nobody cares about Toy Story and that whole area is a waste of space -- none of the rides there are remotely special on their own; they rely on the Toy Story IP to draw people in.

Even Galaxy's Edge potentially has that problem (although highly unlikely). I don't think anyone would care about Smuggler's Run if not for the fact that you're piloting the Millennium Falcon. Rise fares better by being an incredibly impressive attraction, but if there's eventually a point where no one watches or cares about Star Wars, even that ride would probably at least a bit of its luster because it's heavily reliant on the IP from a story perspective.

Pandora, as you mentioned, is a bit different, because it doesn't really rely on any knowledge of the IP for the land or either of rides. Which is why execution matters the most -- as long the execution of the rides/area are excellent, the IP doesn't really matter in the end. If the ride is mediocre and relies on the IP to prop it up, well, you're in a lot of trouble if people no longer care about the IP.
 

The Real Buzz Lightyear

Well-Known Member
In the Parks
No
I think building any dedicated single IP land is a dangerous move long term. It's possible (maybe unlikely, but still possible) that in 25 years, nobody cares about Toy Story and that whole area is a waste of space -- none of the rides there are remotely special on their own; they rely on the Toy Story IP to draw people in.

Even Galaxy's Edge potentially has that problem (although highly unlikely). I don't think anyone would care about Smuggler's Run if not for the fact that you're piloting the Millennium Falcon. Rise fares better by being an incredibly impressive attraction, but if there's eventually a point where no one watches or cares about Star Wars, even that ride would probably at least a bit of its luster because it's heavily reliant on the IP from a story perspective.

Pandora, as you mentioned, is a bit different, because it doesn't really rely on any knowledge of the IP for the land or either of rides. Which is why execution matters the most -- as long the execution of the rides/area are excellent, the IP doesn't really matter in the end. If the ride is mediocre and relies on the IP to prop it up, well, you're in a lot of trouble if people no longer care about the IP.
I can definitely see your point but I do not think Toy Story or Star Wars will be less popular in 25 years. I think they will be timeless just like Snow White or the other classic Disney movies IMO.
 

UNCgolf

Well-Known Member
I can definitely see your point but I do not think Toy Story or Star Wars will be less popular in 25 years. I think they will be timeless just like Snow White or the other classic Disney movies IMO.

I don't think they will either, but you never know.

Toy Story is more likely to fall out of favor than Star Wars, if only because Star Wars will still be releasing new content going forward and Toy Story is done. That doesn't mean it's remotely likely that it will, though -- I don't expect it to happen. It is a danger for single IP lands, though, even if it's a small one.

Huge pop culture franchises have mostly fallen out of the public consciousness in the past, after all.
 
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