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Why does it take 3 years to build a ride?

disney4life2008

Well-Known Member
Better to take time then to have an awful ride. Just look at what happened to journey into your imagination, it was both rushed and had a budget cut and it ended up being one of the worst rides ever made.

Wait you think river journey is an amazing ride? It took them forever to get pandora open.
 

disney4life2008

Well-Known Member
I appreciate all of the opinions set forth in this thread, but the idea that it is reasonable to take 3 years to build a freaking roller coaster is just plain silly, IMHO. And please spare me the planning and designing and theming, etc. arguments - all that has been done and ground has actually been broken, yet we are STILL 3 years away! Ridiculous.

I agree. Doesn't it take Disney half that time to build other things? Disney springs? Dvc? Removal of the race track for expanded parking?
 

disney4life2008

Well-Known Member
As with any large scale projects, i'm sure there are a number of factors which could include things like:
  • Creating the initial design and blueprints
  • Obtaining permits
  • Gathering materials and scheduling crews
  • Weather, unforeseen issues.
There are however a number of unique challenges for Disney in addition to the usual reasons above like:
  • Dismantling and repair of the existing ride if one is being replaced
  • Construction of brand new building and connections with existing buildings
  • Safety Testing
  • IP management (specifically for GotG there is at least another movie in development so they are probably holding off on that to avoid changes if the script kills off or changes any main plot points)
  • Imagineering fine combing details post construction
  • Dealing with the fallout of closing an attraction that might be high volume or loved for long periods of time
Now the argument could be made that Universal has many of these same challenges but still manages to pump out rides in just a year or two time frame. While Universal manages to accomplish this task, I can't help but feel they may be pumping out items in the short term while not thinking about the long term whereas Disney is doing the opposite. New rides I can see taking a few years to develop but simple refurbishments shouldn't take as long (like the recent pirates changes).

Wait what?? I actually disagree. Universal is planning long term. It started with Harry Potter and they have improved ever since. Disney ia still resting on the heels of name. They have Orlando market period. But they need to be aggressive. The problem regardless of what they do and how long, people like us will still go in massive numbers.
 

Master Yoda

Pro Star Wars geek.
Premium Member
I appreciate all of the opinions set forth in this thread, but the idea that it is reasonable to take 3 years to build a freaking roller coaster is just plain silly, IMHO. And please spare me the planning and designing and theming, etc. arguments - all that has been done and ground has actually been broken, yet we are STILL 3 years away! Ridiculous.
If you are not willing to accept the answer, why did you bother answering the question?

The number one reason Disney does not build fast because they don't have to and there currently is almost no financial incentive for them to change.
 

Master Yoda

Pro Star Wars geek.
Premium Member
I agree. Doesn't it take Disney half that time to build other things? Disney springs? Dvc? Removal of the race track for expanded parking?
All of those save for parking have a financial incentive to build as quickly as possible. The parking had a pressing jogistical need, not to mention it is much easier to turn a small oval track into parking lot then it is to turn an unused patch of land into a fully themed E-ticket.
 

DarthVader

Sith Lord
I think a lot goes into the planning, permitting, getting the materials and building. I would not want any organziation to rush through as our safety should be the primary concern.

For instance. Take the Schlitterbahn Waterpark, they wanted to create the worlds largest waterslide, which they did, and sadly the water slide caused a death (a very gruessome one at that :( ). It was reported a few weeks ago, that the owners and people responsible rushed the process so they could impress some TV producers and have their waterpark shown on a show on the Travel Channel.

As much as I want Disney to finish their construction, I'd rather have them go through a process that ensures my family's safety.
 

marni1971

Park History nut
Premium Member
I think a lot goes into the planning, permitting, getting the materials and building. I would not want any organziation to rush through as our safety should be the primary concern.

For instance. Take the Schlitterbahn Waterpark, they wanted to create the worlds largest waterslide, which they did, and sadly the water slide caused a death (a very gruessome one at that :( ). It was reported a few weeks ago, that the owners and people responsible rushed the process so they could impress some TV producers and have their waterpark shown on a show on the Travel Channel.

As much as I want Disney to finish their construction, I'd rather have them go through a process that ensures my family's safety.
Time taken isn’t due to safety. Splash is safe. BTM is safe. SSE is safe. PotC is safe.
 

DarthVader

Sith Lord
Time taken isn’t due to safety. Splash is safe. BTM is safe. SSE is safe. PotC is safe.
I disagree, as the accident from Schlitterbahn shows they rushed through a number of milestones and cut corners to make some sort of timeframe for the travel channel's producers.
 

helenabear

Premium Member
I disagree, as the accident from Schlitterbahn shows they rushed through a number of milestones and cut corners to make some sort of timeframe for the travel channel's producers.

You're comparing apples to zucchini with this. Schlitterbahn was rushed. No one is saying that we need to rush other rides, just that if they can do Splash, BTM, SSE, PotC etc in a reasonable amount of time, that other rides should be done similarly. Look at the chart with Universal. If they can do a whole land in 2+ years that Disney should be able to do *one ride* in less than that and still be safe.
 

Coaster Lover

Well-Known Member
In the Parks
No
Given all the Orlando timelines, it surprises me that Disneyland is claiming that they will be able to open "Marvel Land" at DCA by 2020 (or at least Phase I of Marvel Land). I mean, even if they hold off opening until Christmas of 2020, that still gives them only about 2.5 yrs given that no demo work has started yet. Unless there are no major attractions as part of Phase I, or unless the only attraction in Phase I is a re-skin or smaller attraction/clone, the timeline there just seems to be too fast. But, then again, they were able to keep ToT closed for only ~5 months for all the interior renovations that they needed to do to that attraction for the GotG renovation, so maybe they are just able to do things faster out in Cali?
 

DarthVader

Sith Lord
You're comparing apples to zucchini with this.
No my point remains there is a process to ensure the saftey of the riders, this includes various regulartary inspections and also inspections by engineers. I'm not saying disney is rushing, but I am saying there is a lot that goes into building a ride, which includes a safety aspect.
 

BoarderPhreak

Well-Known Member
First, coming to a consensus of what's going where and what it'll ultimately look like.

Second, bureaucracy. Lots of moving parts, lots of meetings, planning, things to sign off, get approval for (e.g. EPA, FL, etc.) and find funding, yada yada yada.

Finally, ground is broken. Huey, Dewey, and Louie work 3x4 hour shifts weekly, interspersed with numerous site planning meetings (err, coffee breaks) to git 'er done.
 

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