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Why couldn't they. . . ?

ChuckElias

Well-Known Member
Original Poster
So here's my wish.

I wish DCL would sell 90-minute visits while the ships are in Port Canaveral. $50 per person for 90 minutes, which includes a meal in one of the rotational restaurants. 50 people per 90-minute block, subject to a health questionnaire and screening. Limited to very specific public spaces, no wandering, masked and distanced except when at your table in the dining room. One hour between groups so public spaces can be cleaned.

Why couldn't they do this? How is it different from dining at a restaurant at WDW?

If I slip somebody an extra $50, maybe they'd let me eat in Palo?
 

MaryJaneP

Well-Known Member
As appreciative as we are for your thoughtful posts, asking such a question, at least in our case, requires us to do some serious thinking and cogitation, that usually requires several days to plod through our conflicting thoughts. For example, what if you want restaurant A and we want restaurant B? Are they expected to have all restaurants and buffets staffed? What about supplies? If they can do this, what about shows, movies, pools? So many questions. Kinda makes us go "Hmmmm".

Keep asking the good inquiries, Chuck. Please do not be too disappointed if we are slower to respond.
 

aliceismad

Well-Known Member
Beyond the security and covid issues, which are both valid, I don't think $50 would pay for the cleaning, food, and port costs for a 90-minute tour of the ship. I'm sure DCL would be open to such an idea -- I mean, they're trying to open the shops/restaurants at DLR -- but you have to take into account trying to get permission from not only the country and the CDC, but also the port and figuring out staffing and tax implications. One of the primary reasons the cruise lines were so profitable is that they fly under non-U.S. flags, which allows them certain tax situations and enables them to pay low wages to staff members who are willing to work very long days and come from countries that lack the type of labor protections we have in the U.S. I don't know all the rules, but Pride of America is the only ship that I'm aware of that is entirely staffed by U.S. workers and flies under the U.S. flag. DCL's ships are under the Bahamian flag, I believe.
 

ChuckElias

Well-Known Member
Original Poster
Allowing new guests onto the ship is not only a security issue but also a COVID nightmare.

How is it more of a security/covid nightmare than going to The Wave in the Contemporary, just for one example? Yes, there are risks, obviously, but so is operating a hotel and bringing people into its restaurant.
 

ChuckElias

Well-Known Member
Original Poster
I don't think $50 would pay for the cleaning, food, and port costs for a 90-minute tour of the ship.

Maybe $50 is low, but it's just a first idea. The cleaning is going to be in a very limited area, because you're only going to allow people in very limited places. And they're paying the port costs anyway, so that shouldn't be a consideration.
you have to take into account trying to get permission from not only the country and the CDC,

What permission do you need? They're not actually going to be cruising. They're basically Fishlips, except they're only at their location for the day. They'd have to meet CDC requirements for restaurants, and maybe for hotels, but not for actual cruising.

but also the port and figuring out staffing and tax implications. One of the primary reasons the cruise lines were so profitable is that they fly under non-U.S. flags, which allows them certain tax situations and enables them to pay low wages to staff members who are willing to work very long days and come from countries that lack the type of labor protections we have in the U.S. I don't know all the rules, but Pride of America is the only ship that I'm aware of that is entirely staffed by U.S. workers and flies under the U.S. flag. DCL's ships are under the Bahamian flag, I believe.

I'm sorry to be dense, but I don't understand what being non-US flagged has to do with offering a tour and a meal. I don't mean that to be snarky. I honestly don't understand the connection that you're making.
 

DisAl

Well-Known Member
It would probably be prohibitively expensive to "activate" the ships systems just for the revenue generated by the tour and restaurant. That being said, I would LOVE to tour areas of the ships that are normally off limits when the ships are in service such as the bridge and engine room.
(Sorry..... I thought you were talking about while the ships were docked with no cruises going on.)
 
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DCLcruiser

Well-Known Member
How is it more of a security/covid nightmare than going to The Wave in the Contemporary, just for one example? Yes, there are risks, obviously, but so is operating a hotel and bringing people into its restaurant.
Same reason why security is so high at an airport. Hijackings, destruction, thousands of lives at stake. Higher value target for bad guys vs. a restaurant. Then add the fact that guests intermingle a lot more on a cruise than at a hotel, so COVID is a bigger risk.

Paying thousands of dollars to board a ship is a lot less likely to attract bad guys vs. a $50 ticket. Plus I am sure passengers are screened for security issues after you upload your personal details on the website.
 

castlecake2.0

Well-Known Member
I wish they could, but as mentioned it would be a Covid nightmare, and would be especially dangerous for the crew that live onboard. Also the CDC would probably not allow such thing. I wish they could though because I’d love to have my job back :(
 

MaryJaneP

Well-Known Member
Allowing new guests onto the ship is not only a security issue but also a COVID nightmare. The terminal is basically an airport. I'm not sure I see the draw? Driving all the way to PC to eat basic food? Is this really a "time share tour" to get people to browse the ship and then at the end of dinner offer them a chance to order a future sailing?
DCL - the best kept secret
 

Phonedave

Well-Known Member
Maybe $50 is low, but it's just a first idea. The cleaning is going to be in a very limited area, because you're only going to allow people in very limited places. And they're paying the port costs anyway, so that shouldn't be a consideration.


What permission do you need? They're not actually going to be cruising. They're basically Fishlips, except they're only at their location for the day. They'd have to meet CDC requirements for restaurants, and maybe for hotels, but not for actual cruising.

I suspect there are additional port costs when you allow non-employees into the area. If your ship is docked, you are paying docking fees. If you are "open for business" then the port has to have additional security, screeners, personnel, etc. While nobody is actually cruising, it is still a port and certain requirements apply.

It's a neat idea, but I suspect it would be very expensive. The ships are running with a minimal crew right now. To handle this idea they would have to add servers, cooks, greeters etc. These people are not local, they live on the ship. Now you have to provide meals and lodging for these people. You can't keep them hostage on the ship 24/7 so when they come back from liberty they are going to have to be COVID tested. I also wonder just how many people would take advantage of this if it was offered.
 

aliceismad

Well-Known Member
Maybe $50 is low, but it's just a first idea. The cleaning is going to be in a very limited area, because you're only going to allow people in very limited places. And they're paying the port costs anyway, so that shouldn't be a consideration.


What permission do you need? They're not actually going to be cruising. They're basically Fishlips, except they're only at their location for the day. They'd have to meet CDC requirements for restaurants, and maybe for hotels, but not for actual cruising.



I'm sorry to be dense, but I don't understand what being non-US flagged has to do with offering a tour and a meal. I don't mean that to be snarky. I honestly don't understand the connection that you're making.
I have a limited understanding of all of this, and I know more about other cruise lines than Disney, so take this all with a grain of salt. :)
If they were to operate as a restaurant and/or hotel at Port Canaveral rather than as a cruise ship, they should have to abide by regulations for U.S. businesses, which are entirely different than the ones they operate under normally. You wouldn't be able to use the normal cruise staff because they're not U.S. citizens, and the Customs and Border Patrol lawsuit in 2015ish says you can't even do a cruise-to-nowhere with non-U.S. staff due to immigration concerns. So you'd have to hire and train a U.S. staff and pay them accordingly. Beyond labor laws, the U.S. has stricter laws about food service, liquor licenses, pollution regulation, etc. that cruise ships do not abide by. There might also be local zoning or other regulations. My understanding also is that the costs are very different for parking an empty ship at a port vs. operating a ship at a port. Plus the security implications, especially if the area is a working port for other types of vessels.

Further, though, there is the tax situation. Overall, most cruise lines pay very, very little in U.S. taxes. That's why when there was talk about bailouts for the travel industries, cruise ships are a bit of a sticky situation. I assume if a ship were to operate a tour or as a dining venue in a U.S. port, there would be significant tax implications.

In the past, some cruise lines have allowed day-guests (particularly for weddings), so it may not out of the realm of possibility. Also the Queen Mary operates/d as a floating hotel out in Long Beach; however, she is moored permanently and is also on the National Register of Historic Places. (Also she's closed right now because covid and California.)
 

LittleMerman

Active Member
I think that's a great idea but people probably wouldn't travel far for this so I don't know how many local and semi-local people would actually go. It might not be enough to off-set operating costs.
 
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HauntedPirate

Sheltered-at-home Park nostalgist
Premium Member
I don’t know if it would be feasible, but I know a couple of people who would LOVE to be on a Disney cruise ship again, even for something like this.
 

MaryJaneP

Well-Known Member
Could you get around the "cruise to nowhere" hurdle by having a foreign entity semi-permanently establish a "floating embassy" on a cruise ship, thus rendering the entire ship part of the foreign country? Non-resident workers, different laws, etc. would seemingly apply? Too much?
 

aliceismad

Well-Known Member
Could you get around the "cruise to nowhere" hurdle by having a foreign entity semi-permanently establish a "floating embassy" on a cruise ship, thus rendering the entire ship part of the foreign country? Non-resident workers, different laws, etc. would seemingly apply? Too much?
This article was a good explanation for me. Basically an exemption for cruises to nowhere might be possible, but it seems more likely that ships would stop at a "private island." Or perhaps ports in countries like Mexico, which have not really closed to tourists?


I will be interested to see how the vaccine rollout impacts the return to cruising and whether cruise lines choose to require vaccinations. There has been a lot of speculation. https://www.orlandosentinel.com/cor...0210225-4adg5n4f6fc7pgypzx7f2tr4k4-story.html
 

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