Wheelchairs no longer complimentary at Disney's water parks

Jon81uk

Well-Known Member
I kind of assumed this was complimentary since there were minimal things someone confined to a chair could do there. I mean how much money will they now rake in off of this?

But equally if you are confined to a chair permanently you would be in your own when you arrived. But yes, the majority of attractions are up stairs.
 

Seabasealpha1

Well-Known Member
Guess Grandma won't be attending the water parks with us this year...

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No Name

Well-Known Member
They charge for strollers. On a basic level this isn't too different. I like that they charge for strollers, because if they didn't, even more families would use them and the pathways would be even more clogged. I think strollers are fine, it's just that the parks weren't built to handle them, or handle too many of them.

Much like strollers, wheelchairs also clog up the pathways. So by charging for them, you weed out those guests who don'y really need wheelchairs but use them for the heck of it.

The key difference to me is that many others actually do need them for medical reasons. And many of those others, because of such medical reasons, cannot experience or participate in much that the waterparks have to offer. So, since they paid the same price to get in (is that right?) but can do far less ... at the very least Disney could give them a wheelchair.

It's a catch 22, they help one problem and hurt another. I'm not sure which is better, charging or not charging. Of course Disney will go with whatever'll make more money, and from this decision, it's evident which option they believe will do that.

Mine was always very polite and said nice things to everyone.

LOL. :D Such a dumb joke but you made me laugh.
 

CaptainAmerica

Well-Known Member
They charge for strollers. On a basic level this isn't too different. I like that they charge for strollers, because if they didn't, even more families would use them and the pathways would be even more clogged. I think strollers are fine, it's just that the parks weren't built to handle them, or handle too many of them.

Much like strollers, wheelchairs also clog up the pathways. So by charging for them, you weed out those guests who don'y really need wheelchairs but use them for the heck of it.

The key difference to me is that many others actually do need them for medical reasons. And many of those others, because of such medical reasons, cannot experience or participate in much that the waterparks have to offer. So, since they paid the same price to get in (is that right?) but can do far less ... at the very least Disney could give them a wheelchair.

It's a catch 22, they help one problem and hurt another. I'm not sure which is better, charging or not charging. Of course Disney will go with whatever'll make more money, and from this decision, it's evident which option they believe will do that.

LOL. :D Such a dumb joke but you made me laugh.
I suspect that most people who actually need one already have one, right?

I kind of assumed this was complimentary since there were minimal things someone confined to a chair could do there. I mean how much money will they now rake in off of this?
This isn't about making money, it's about influencing guest behavior. The goal is not to profit off of people who need wheelchairs, it's about discouraging people who don't need wheelchairs from using them just because they're free.
 
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asianway

Well-Known Member
I suspect that most people who actually need one already have one, right?


This isn't about making money, it's about influencing guest behavior. The goal is not to profit off of people who need wheelchairs, it's about discouraging people who don't need wheelchairs from using them just because they're free.
have you ever been to a water park? Ive seen 2-3 chairs tops, ever.
 

No Name

Well-Known Member
I suspect that most people who actually need one already have one, right?

Yes, I'd think so.

This isn't about making money, it's about influencing guest behavior. The goal is not to profit off of people who need wheelchairs, it's about discouraging people who don't need wheelchairs from using them just because they're free.
have you ever been to a water park? Ive seen 2-3 chairs tops, ever.

I'll be the boxing referee and squeeze between you both. And say that it's partially for crowd control, partially for money. Maybe not equally for both, but certainly not 100% for one or the other. Match end in a draw.

You boxers may not like what the referee has to say, but what can you do about it? The referee makes the final call.
I suppose if you truly disagree you could strip your clothes off. :D
 

Minnie Mum

Well-Known Member
Wheelchairs aren't complimentary anywhere else on property, so why would they be at the water parks? Actually, that isn't true- there are a few chairs made available for guests to get from the park gates to the bus or tram areas, but those are few and far between. Wheelchairs cost money, and they need to be maintained, which costs money. Why shouldn't Disney charge for their use?

Most guests who need a wheelchair either have their own, or rent from an off site agency for their whole stay, or rent one at the parks for the day.

As someone who has had to use a chair at WDW for almost 20 years, I can assure the PP that nobody chooses to do it for giggles, or just because they're there for the asking, or because they're too lazy to walk. Stupid teenagers aside (and I highly doubt that they would be in the majority), those "inconsiderate " guests in their wheelchairs who are clogging up the sidewalks and getting in your way, are using them because they NEED them.
 

Rob562

Well-Known Member
But equally if you are confined to a chair permanently you would be in your own when you arrived. But yes, the majority of attractions are up stairs.

I believe many (though not all) slides at Blizzard Beach are handicap accessible via the ski lift. There's one or two "gondola" cars on the cable to accommodate chairs.
From the top they can access Slush Gusher, Teamboat Springs, and most of the mat and tube slides.

According to the BB map only Summit Plummet and Downhill Double Dipper are "must be ambulatory".

-Rob
 

ford91exploder

Resident Curmudgeon
Wheelchairs aren't complimentary anywhere else on property, so why would they be at the water parks? Actually, that isn't true- there are a few chairs made available for guests to get from the park gates to the bus or tram areas, but those are few and far between. Wheelchairs cost money, and they need to be maintained, which costs money. Why shouldn't Disney charge for their use?

Most guests who need a wheelchair either have their own, or rent from an off site agency for their whole stay, or rent one at the parks for the day.

As someone who has had to use a chair at WDW for almost 20 years, I can assure the PP that nobody chooses to do it for giggles, or just because they're there for the asking, or because they're too lazy to walk. Stupid teenagers aside (and I highly doubt that they would be in the majority), those "inconsiderate " guests in their wheelchairs who are clogging up the sidewalks and getting in your way, are using them because they NEED them.

It's because charging for wheelchairs is more low hanging fruit on the 'Gotta Make our Numbers' tree sadly enough.
 

CaptainAmerica

Well-Known Member
It's because charging for wheelchairs is more low hanging fruit on the 'Gotta Make our Numbers' tree sadly enough.
I'll play along.

Approximately 2 million Americans are wheelchair or scooter riders. In a nation of 300 million people, that's 0.67% of the population. I think it would be safe to assume that a relatively smaller percentage of wheelchair users decide to visit water parks in a given year, but let's assume the population percentage holds. Blizzard Beach and Typhoon Lagoon have combined annual attendance of approximately 4 million. Applying the 0.67% figure, we can estimate that the number of guests visiting a Disney water park in need of a wheelchair is about 27,000, but let's round up to 30,000 to be generous. Even if none of those people came with their own mobility devices, the annual revenue on 30,000 wheelchair rentals at $12 a pop is $360,000, or less than $1,000 per day. You're willfully ignorant if you think $45,000 per park per quarter is going to help anybody "Make their Numbers."
 

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