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News Walt Disney World theme parks increase capacity but see longer waits and less physical distancing

SoFloMagic

Well-Known Member
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This word of mouth does not change demand either way, the vast majority of guest have no clue are not part of it. The people that hear "the word of mouth" is a very small subset of who actually go to Disney.
Really? I would think people are doing research before travelling during a pandemic.
I think Facebook posts of empty parks have been at least somewhat influential in getting people to come.
 

HongKongFooy

Well-Known Member
Never said there was “problem” with their decision.


True, but your words greatly implied a problem or more specifically due to a lack of planning unwitting folk will enter the Navi queue as far back as the bridge:

"....as we all know, a lot of folks do almost no planning before walking into the parks. Case in point,................"


I, like willtravel, was going to ask you pretty much the same question.
 

monothingie

Hater of giant Epcot tacos but lover of real tacos
Premium Member
So maybe Disney should be blaming themselves for opening up wdw when the Florida numbers were so high, instead of blaming the governor of California publicly? :)
You don't think that the same slow start will happen in California when they eventually open? Just like with resuming indoor dining or any other social activity it's miserable at first for businesses as people want to become reaccustomed with it again, but you have to start somewhere. It's not a light switch.

If the people in charge of the parks expected that guests would be clawing at the gates upon reopening, then they were fools. But at the same time, they have to be given a chance to get started. WDW (and the rest of their world-wide theme parks) has demonstrated that it can be done safely and responsibly. California government at this point is being arbitrary and it's causing a lot of damage and as so Disney is right to be frustrated.

BTW, isn't 25% of capacity a little less than normal non-holiday weekday off season crowds?
 
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GimpYancIent

Well-Known Member
You don't think that the same slow start will happen in California when they eventually open? Just like with resuming indoor dining or any other social activity it's miserable at first for businesses as people want to become reaccustomed with it again, but you have to start somewhere. It's not a light switch.

If the people in charge of the parks expected that guests would be clawing at the gates upon reopening, then they were fools. But at the same time, they have to be given a chance to get started. WDW (and the rest of their world-wide theme parks) has demonstrated that it can be done safely and responsibly. California government at this point is being arbitrary and it's causing a lot of damage and as so Disney is right to be frustrated.

BTW, isn't 25% of capacity a little less than normal non-holiday weekday off season crowds?
"Clawing" at the gates is a bit of am exaggeration but substantial lines to get in Yea! 25% for a Disney park is close to 100% for any other entertainment venue. It's Disney! and all will be well. It is the surrounding community that will take a long time to recover.
 

dX927

Member
I went to Magic Kingdom on Sunday with some friends who hadn't been there in years and they had an amazing time. The waits were getting a little crazy at times (Splash Mountain was up to 110 minutes at one point) but by 5 everything dropped immensely. We got into the park just after 10 and were able to do the Jungle Cruise, Splash Mountain, Big Thunder Mountain, Seven Dwarfs, Little Mermaid, Buzz Lightyear, Peter Pan, Mickey's Philharmagic, Country Bears, and Haunted Mansion but could have easily fit in a few more. We even had 3 snack breaks and a shopping break in there. The monorail back was barely even a 10 minute wait.

One thing I didn't think about beforehand was trying to shop at the end of the night. The line for the Emporium wrapped from the entrance all the way around Casey's Corner. Confectionary line wasn't as long but by the time we got to order they were low on products.
 

Ldno

Well-Known Member
I went to Magic Kingdom on Sunday with some friends who hadn't been there in years and they had an amazing time. The waits were getting a little crazy at times (Splash Mountain was up to 110 minutes at one point) but by 5 everything dropped immensely. We got into the park just after 10 and were able to do the Jungle Cruise, Splash Mountain, Big Thunder Mountain, Seven Dwarfs, Little Mermaid, Buzz Lightyear, Peter Pan, Mickey's Philharmagic, Country Bears, and Haunted Mansion but could have easily fit in a few more. We even had 3 snack breaks and a shopping break in there. The monorail back was barely even a 10 minute wait.

One thing I didn't think about beforehand was trying to shop at the end of the night. The line for the Emporium wrapped from the entrance all the way around Casey's Corner. Confectionary line wasn't as long but by the time we got to order they were low on products.
How long is the usual line to the emporium?
 

Tom Morrow

Well-Known Member
I’ve been at the parks this week. They are absolutely slammed. I don’t believe for a second that this is 25% of capacity like they claim. Every single major ride’s queue stretches into another land. Even if you removed the social distancing, these queues would still be overflowing. There aren’t enough capacity eaters closed to create THIS much of queue overflow.

Also it’s sad that they’re running on limited park hours, cutting more, and laying off thousands when the demand is unquestionably there. These short park hours are unacceptable.

The ONLY silver lining is that no Fastpass means smoother, faster moving lines and way less planning, stress, and strategy. You can do the same amount as you would with booking Fastpass. Imagine how much better it would be operating attractions at full capacity? Unfortunately the average guest will not see it like that. They will think “long lines = I need Fastpass!”
 

TrainChasers

Well-Known Member
Thanks, I like to head in there after park closure, but I’ve been hearing you usually have to queue to get in stores in and I panicked, thanks!
Sorry if I misunderstood your question. I haven’t been in the parks lately, i was saying “usually” as in usually in “normal times”
 

giantgolfer

Well-Known Member
I’ve been at the parks this week. They are absolutely slammed. I don’t believe for a second that this is 25% of capacity like they claim. Every single major ride’s queue stretches into another land. Even if you removed the social distancing, these queues would still be overflowing. There aren’t enough capacity eaters closed to create THIS much of queue overflow.

Also it’s sad that they’re running on limited park hours, cutting more, and laying off thousands when the demand is unquestionably there. These short park hours are unacceptable.

The ONLY silver lining is that no Fastpass means smoother, faster moving lines and way less planning, stress, and strategy. You can do the same amount as you would with booking Fastpass. Imagine how much better it would be operating attractions at full capacity? Unfortunately the average guest will not see it like that. They will think “long lines = I need Fastpass!”
Normal operating days pre-Covid were about 50% capacity. 25% right now is probably very accurate. When the parks opened earlier in the summer they were probably only at 10-15% capacity.
 

LUVMCO

Well-Known Member
I’ve been at the parks this week. They are absolutely slammed. I don’t believe for a second that this is 25% of capacity like they claim. Every single major ride’s queue stretches into another land. Even if you removed the social distancing, these queues would still be overflowing. There aren’t enough capacity eaters closed to create THIS much of queue overflow.

Also it’s sad that they’re running on limited park hours, cutting more, and laying off thousands when the demand is unquestionably there. These short park hours are unacceptable.

The ONLY silver lining is that no Fastpass means smoother, faster moving lines and way less planning, stress, and strategy. You can do the same amount as you would with booking Fastpass. Imagine how much better it would be operating attractions at full capacity? Unfortunately the average guest will not see it like that. They will think “long lines = I need Fastpass!”
I really wish they'd go back to the old fast pass system.
 

MikeyK72

Well-Known Member
I really wish they'd go back to the old fast pass system.
...maybe just a more modern form of it instead of the paper tickets.

For example, tap your magic band at a kiosk to get a digital FP added to your MDE+ app. That way, no paper tickets but still forces guests to "have skin in the game" by physically going to the attraction to get the pass.
 

Tom Morrow

Well-Known Member
Normal operating days pre-Covid were about 50% capacity. 25% right now is probably very accurate. When the parks opened earlier in the summer they were probably only at 10-15% capacity.
But a normal 50% day wouldn’t have queues spilling well beyond their entrances even if you removed the social distancing. I know some of the big theater shows are closed but still, something seems off. My guess is this is closer to 35-40% of capacity.
 

Jrb1979

Well-Known Member
When I see the complaints about long wait times it makes think Disney fans are spoiled and never go to local parks. Waiting 2 hours for a ride at Cedar Point is average. Too many are used using FP to get on a ride in 20 minutes. All the more reason for a paid system to be put in place.
 

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