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The Integration of Fox into the Disney Corporate Family: Parks, Movies, IPs, Studios

seascape

Well-Known Member
The sale of YES is now closed, and all the RSNs are off the books. In early November, in the quarterly report and conference call we will learn a great deal. The Corporate Debt total after the purchase and sale of the major assets they had to sell, the initial signups for Disney Plus, which looks higher than their initial estimates, and of course more information on SW:GE attendance.

I expect WDW attendance for the quarter to be down because of delayed vacations and the cancellations due to the Hurricane. Disneyland should see an increase as GE is partially open. Overall, the market should be happy because of Disney Plus. The future is very bright and just wait until January when RoTR is open at both parks and the real gain in park attendance.
 

Slpy3270

Active Member
It appears Disney is having trouble finding a buyer for Fox Sports Brazil. Translated by Google from this page [sic]:

The sale of FOX Sports has encountered complications, far greater than initially thought and this has made Disney return to CADE, asking for more time to sell the channel. The information comes from TV columnist Flávio Ricco at UOL.

According to him, the way negotiation was conceived is making the business unfeasible.

Market professionals, consulted, point out the amounts paid per subscriber as the main complicating factor. What's more, as they were calculated, with the station's budget seriously compromised, they make any negotiation impeditive.

Now is waiting for a manifestation of CADE. However, there is almost certainty that the case should remain unsolved for some time to come.
 

Slpy3270

Active Member
From a New York Times interview with Bob Iger:

He tells the stories of his four megadeals: how he charmed Steve Jobs, after Mr. Jobs had an acrimonious split from Disney in the Eisner era, and bought Pixar to save Disney animation; how he (sometimes with Ms. Bay) wooed a wary, reclusive Ike Perlmutter to get Marvel and how he persuaded George Lucas to sell him the Star Wars universe at a lower price than he paid for Pixar.

“Rupert was crazed that we bought Lucas,” Mr. Iger says, with shy pride. “They were the distributor of all of George’s movies, and he was very disappointed in his people. ‘Why didn’t you think of this?’”
Ouch. No wonder Rupert sold out.
 

Slpy3270

Active Member
Sooo...those who are hoping for a Die Hard reboot or sequel, or any Fox franchise from the 80s, might want to read this 'cause Disney/Fox don't have much time to do so.

In the late 1970s, Congress amended the law to allow authors to grab back rights from studios after waiting a few decades. Until now, the termination provision has largely been exploited by musicians, not screenwriters. But records show a flurry of termination notices in the past year — under law, they can come 35 years after publication — which threatens to unsettle who owns the ability to make sequels and reboots of iconic films from the mid- to late-'80s.

More works that could change hands: Gary K. Wolf is looking to terminate Disney's rights to the book that became Who Framed Roger Rabbit. The heirs of Beetlejuice screenwriter Michael McDowell aim to do the same for the script to the 1988 Warner Bros. film. The family of novelist Roderick Thorp is terminating Fox's grip on Nothing Lasts Forever, aka Die Hard. Other works subject to termination include Predator and Nightmare on Elm Street, with authors like Stephen King and David Mamet also on the warpath.
TL; DR: if Disney doesn't care enough about the IP, the rights go back to the original writer/author or his/her family and he/she/they can shop the project elsewhere to another studio, and all Disney will have are the films Fox already produced.

Also, that Alien Nation remake that Disney shelved? If they don't get that one back on track, then the film's screenwriter (who filed a termination notice late last year) will get the rights to the IP back by 2021 and get another studio to produce it.
 
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Quinnmac000

Well-Known Member
Sooo...those who are hoping for a Die Hard reboot or sequel, or any Fox franchise from the 80s, might want to read this 'cause Disney/Fox don't have much time to do so.

TL; DR: if Disney doesn't care enough about the IP, the rights go back to the original writer/author or his/her family and he/she/they can shop the project elsewhere to another studio, and all Disney will have are the films Fox already produced.

Also, that Alien Nation remake that Disney shelved? If they don't get that one back on track, then the film's screenwriter (who filed a termination notice late last year) will get the rights to the IP back by 2021 and get another studio to produce it.
You misread....it doesn't matter even if Disney cares about an IP, the rights can go back to the original owner if the owner so choses and they can do whatever they want with it to include giving it to another studio. However, this is specific to domestic rights. Disney will own the rights for the property outside the country which means if they did make a film they could have it distributed by someone else stateside.
 

lee.moles.disney

Well-Known Member
Interesting that for Disney+ it looks like family fox films are being rebranded to Disney a la the Original Miracle on 34th street.
 
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