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Terminally ill and need scooter

pjkdog

Well-Known Member
I think maybe what he is mad about is that you can not go on the trip and count on a scooter being available at the park because they might all be taken by the time he arrives because sometimes, and I stress sometimes, many are taken by people that are not necessarily disabled but whose weight has made them want to order a scooter at the park.
I feel for this man as he is going through a tough time, and I hope we can ignore it if he is surly in responses, my guess is this is a very emotional time and he is just typing out, this place can be a sounding board too, doesn't hurt any of us really.
 

Gabe1

Premium Member
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Some guests forget that you need to sign the book to get your key and then at the end of the trip sign the book AND return your key. I have seen drivers pull up, get off the scooter and walk away without any acknowledgement and recording by Bell Services - and that is the fault of the guest, not Bell Services.
I was at Bonnet Creek Hilton. I didn't sign out the cart and I didn't sign it when I dropped it off nor was I asked or instructed by anyone to do so either picking it up or dropping it off. Most of these carts come with all inclusive insurance. Mine did from Apple. It included loss, theft, damage etc.

I think maybe what he is mad about is that you can not go on the trip and count on a scooter being available at the park because they might all be taken by the time he arrives because sometimes, and I stress sometimes, many are taken by people that are not necessarily disabled but whose weight has made them want to order a scooter at the park.

I feel for this man as he is going through a tough time, and I hope we can ignore it if he is surly in responses, my guess is this is a very emotional time and he is just typing out, this place can be a sounding board too, doesn't hurt any of us really.
I never find fat shaming acceptable and not excusable IMO. It is becoming all too common the last few years to say, tweet etc on social media nasty, hurtful things about others to get what they want for themselves. I find it a reckless trend in general.

I didn't think you could ORDER at scooter at a park. I thought the parks rented those on a first come, first served basis.
 
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wdwgirl2005

Member
I completely agree with the overweight part. I recently went, and there were people with their kids in there, only kids in the scooters, or people who were perfectly fine ( I saw them get up at least 10 times ). It's completely unacceptable to use one just so you don't have to walk, or to let your kids use like a toy.
 

networkpro

Well-Known Member
I completely agree with the overweight part. I recently went, and there were people with their kids in there, only kids in the scooters, or people who were perfectly fine ( I saw them get up at least 10 times ). It's completely unacceptable to use one just so you don't have to walk, or to let your kids use like a toy.
Here we go again, it seems you are searching for every post with the word "scooter" in it, counting how many times someone got up from one and then determining that they really shouldn't be using one.
 

wdwgirl2005

Member
Here we go again, it seems you are searching for every post with the word "scooter" in it, counting how many times someone got up from one and then determining that they really shouldn't be using one.
no, I'm just saying there's people who aren't capable of walking, and they need scooters. I specifically saw them getting up, and walking just fine. No need to start fights :)
 

LeighM

Well-Known Member
I completely agree with the overweight part. I recently went, and there were people with their kids in there, only kids in the scooters, or people who were perfectly fine ( I saw them get up at least 10 times ). It's completely unacceptable to use one just so you don't have to walk, or to let your kids use like a toy.
You can't really judge by that because some people who use scooters are fine with walking short distances. It's the all day walking in the park or standing for any length of time that can be a problem. You can't judge a disability just by looking at someone. No one knows what another person is fighting. My Mom never looked sick and she could walk short distances. No one could tell by looking at her that she was dying of leukemia and got tired easily. And maybe some of those people are overweight because they ARE disabled and thus aren't able to get the required amount of exercise to keep the weight off. Or maybe the disability causes the weight gain.
 

pjkdog

Well-Known Member
You can't really judge by that because some people who use scooters are fine with walking short distances. It's the all day walking in the park or standing for any length of time that can be a problem. You can't judge a disability just by looking at someone. No one knows what another person is fighting. My Mom never looked sick and she could walk short distances. No one could tell by looking at her that she was dying of leukemia and got tired easily. And maybe some of those people are overweight because they ARE disabled and thus aren't able to get the required amount of exercise to keep the weight off. Or maybe the disability causes the weight gain.
People have developed these views, from when they see an entire family scooting along. Or in my case, the time I saw a scooter break down and the man hopped off and started dragging it sideways down the sidewalk.
 

wdwgirl2005

Member
People have developed these views, from when they see an entire family scooting along. Or in my case, the time I saw a scooter break down and the man hopped off and started dragging it sideways down the sidewalk.
Thank you! It was a woman and her child, and she seemed perfectly fine. I do get that you can't tell when some people have disabilities, but if you can walk all the way to the bathroom and back, hand the scooter back in.
 

Bullseye1967

Well-Known Member
I'll bite on this one even though I know I shouldn't. We have used Walker rentals around the times my wife had each knee replacement. They were wonderful every time. We did have one break down once, but they were there with a replacement all the way in the world showcase within 45 minutes. I can't recommend them enough.
Who should use a ECV? Whoever feels they need it! Like I mentioned my wife has had knee issues and could not have done the parks without it. My brother is over weight and can not do a whole park day without one. I guess he would fall into the category that some feel should not be using an ECV. He has a medical condition that has caused him to gain quite a bit of weight in the last few years. Is that anyone's business? No. IMO anyone who would be unable to enjoy the parks just like everyone else without an ECV should and does have the right to use one. Never judge someone till you have walked in their shoes.
 

ninjaprincesst

Well-Known Member
I completely agree with the overweight part. I recently went, and there were people with their kids in there, only kids in the scooters, or people who were perfectly fine ( I saw them get up at least 10 times ). It's completely unacceptable to use one just so you don't have to walk, or to let your kids use like a toy.
Yes it is but you never know a situation , just because someone can stand up and walk does not mean they can walk all the time. My Dad has a prosthetic leg, he can walk but not Disney distances, sometimes when we get off a ride he will send my daughter to go get his scooter as where you come out of the ride and where the scooters are parked is quite a distance. Don't be so quick to judge, and also just because someone is overweight does not mean they just stuff their face 24/7 sometimes there are medical reasons.
 

ninjaprincesst

Well-Known Member
Thank you! It was a woman and her child, and she seemed perfectly fine. I do get that you can't tell when some people have disabilities, but if you can walk all the way to the bathroom and back, hand the scooter back in.
My Dad has a prosthetic leg and a rod in his back, yes he can easily walk to the bathroom and back, but he can't walk all over Disney, people have different needs just because they can walk does not mean they can walk all over.
 

DisneyJoe

Well-Known Member
My Dad has a prosthetic leg and a rod in his back, yes he can easily walk to the bathroom and back, but he can't walk all over Disney, people have different needs just because they can walk does not mean they can walk all over.
Both my legs are prosthetic, most people cannot tell by looking at me. I have the same situation, I can walk some distance, but not Disney distance. Occasionally my son will fetch the ECV for me, it's an extremely short ride for him, what's the harm, he is helping his father.

Not all bathrooms are easy for an ECV to enter and maneuver, yes, some are and the handicapped stall is easy to use - others have a tiny door, they are crowded, they aren't supposed to get wet, and sometimes it is difficult to turn around to get back out. I'll even park the ECV outside of a restaurant as that is what Disney prefers, unless it is absolutely necessary to remain seated in it.
 

ninjaprincesst

Well-Known Member
In response to the OP, renting a scooter offsite is way way more economical than at the parks, (about $20 a day as opposed to the $50 plus per day at the parks) You have the scooter all the time, and if you use one of the Disney approved vendors (apple, buena vista, scooter bug) they will have you sooter waiting at the hotel when you arrive and when you leave you just turn it in to the bell desk, they also usually come with a back up battery, and if the scooter does break down for some reason they will bring a new one to you wherever you are in the park. You can use scooters on the larger boats going to MK as well as the friendship boats, you can take them on the monorail as well as the new Skyliner when it launches and if you have issues getting them on the bus the driver will always help.
 

wdwgirl2005

Member
My Dad has a prosthetic leg and a rod in his back, yes he can easily walk to the bathroom and back, but he can't walk all over Disney, people have different needs just because they can walk does not mean they can walk all over.
I know that some disabilities aren't visible, but sometimes it's hard to believe. Seeing someone get up and leaving their kid on there..it was hard to believe that she actually had a disability. But you DO have to agree though, some people use the scooters out of pure laziness. Thanks for replying :)
 

ninjaprincesst

Well-Known Member
People have developed these views, from when they see an entire family scooting along. Or in my case, the time I saw a scooter break down and the man hopped off and started dragging it sideways down the sidewalk.
Again , sometimes people are not totally disabled the may have a disability where the a perfectly fine for short periods of time but give out easily, and we sure got those looks on our last trip as my Dad has the before mentioned disability and my mother had an emergency surgery on her neck 2 weeks before our trip and was having hip replacement surgery 2 weeks after we go home. They both look perfectly fine to onlookers and both look about 50 not 70, so Im sure people thought that we were "those" people where everyone had a scooter, and I myself have bad knees so sometimes when my knees were giving me real fits my Dad would walk for a bit and let me use the scooter, so Im sure we were thought as "those people.
 

pjkdog

Well-Known Member
Thank you! It was a woman and her child, and she seemed perfectly fine. I do get that you can't tell when some people have disabilities, but if you can walk all the way to the bathroom and back, hand the scooter back in.
Well, that is not a long walk and some people with issues can handle some walking. What we know though are clearly there is at least a percentage of people that are in them because either they just don't want to walk or their eating has gotten to the point they can't support themselves for long periods. I would hope the need for a scooter was a wake up call.
Again , sometimes people are not totally disabled the may have a disability where the a perfectly fine for short periods of time but give out easily, and we sure got those looks on our last trip as my Dad has the before mentioned disability and my mother had an emergency surgery on her neck 2 weeks before our trip and was having hip replacement surgery 2 weeks after we go home. They both look perfectly fine to onlookers and both look about 50 not 70, so Im sure people thought that we were "those" people where everyone had a scooter, and I myself have bad knees so sometimes when my knees were giving me real fits my Dad would walk for a bit and let me use the scooter, so Im sure we were thought as "those people.
I don't disagree. My mother in law can walk short distances and but anything longer than a 5 min walk and her back just erupts. She certainly isn't going to scooter into a bathroom. But I think we all know what we are talking about. It is simply not normal for an entire family to need scooters.
 

aliceismad

Well-Known Member
I know that some disabilities aren't visible, but sometimes it's hard to believe. Seeing someone get up and leaving their kid on there..it was hard to believe that she actually had a disability. But you DO have to agree though, some people use the scooters out of pure laziness. Thanks for replying :)
Every post you make on this thread makes you just sound more closed minded and judgmental. You basically just keep saying “well, I know I’m wrong but I’m not wrong and you have to agree with me.”
 

homerdance

Well-Known Member
i never understood why Disney doesn't allow you to buy a length of stay scooter rental directly from them. On one of our recent trips we had someone in our party who required a scooter and we used a third party approved by Disney. It was simple enough to use, they delivered it to the resort, we picked it up, and just left it at bell services when we were done. Simple enough.

But the person in our party didn't it need it 100% of the time, they were up for some walking/standing but not full days worth. It would have been much better if we could have paid a fee, obviously it would be in range of the daily rate from disney vs. off site, but allow the scooter to be reserved so we knew one would be available. And instead of having to through and fill out the rental agreement and all of that everyday (wasting valuable park time), do it once before arrival, sign the paperwork online, pay, select parks and days, on that day walk up, wave my magic band, get scooter. Seems like a lot easier process and a way for disney to make more money.
 

DisneyJoe

Well-Known Member
i never understood why Disney doesn't allow you to buy a length of stay scooter rental directly from them. On one of our recent trips we had someone in our party who required a scooter and we used a third party approved by Disney. It was simple enough to use, they delivered it to the resort, we picked it up, and just left it at bell services when we were done. Simple enough.

But the person in our party didn't it need it 100% of the time, they were up for some walking/standing but not full days worth. It would have been much better if we could have paid a fee, obviously it would be in range of the daily rate from disney vs. off site, but allow the scooter to be reserved so we knew one would be available. And instead of having to through and fill out the rental agreement and all of that everyday (wasting valuable park time), do it once before arrival, sign the paperwork online, pay, select parks and days, on that day walk up, wave my magic band, get scooter. Seems like a lot easier process and a way for disney to make more money.
If they did that, they would need an efficient and working system to manage and save the reserved scooters, including IT systems AND locations to hold the reserved scooters. It also adds a bunch of operational issues.

They would need to manage the possibly changing number of ECVs at each location based on the reservations. For example, let's say they have 100 (nice round number) at each park. If the number being used by those with reservations is less than that per day, it is not a problem, however, if the next day, 110 reserved ECVs are needed at MK and they only have 100, they would need to move 10 to MK somehow, thus depleting the fleet somewhere else. Sure, they could setup a warehouse on property with a fleet of ECVs as well as delivery trucks, train drivers and figure out the logistics and space for park storage etc, but why do that when the demand for what you're suggesting is likely minimal and offsite companies already provide a service? or just having an inventory at each park first-come first-serve is working?
 
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