News Star Wars: Rise of the Resistance opening reports and using Boarding Groups at Disney's Hollywood Studios

rowrbazzle

Well-Known Member
When Disney shut everything down in March, every single facility was evacuated and virtually nobody was allowed into any building for any reason other than security or critical services. Nobody was authorized to work in the building for many, many months so the most they could do was software work which they could do from home, but nothing could be done inside the building. Maintaining an attraction was not classified as essential services so they just shut it all down until it was deemed safe to return around June sometime when the preparations for re-opening began.
Essential, shmessential. It's an arbitrary designation. If Universal could continue construction, then why exactly couldn't Disney perform repairs?
 

Twirlnhurl

Active Member
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I’ve referenced many times before the major issues they had with the ride system in Spaceship Earth. The rotation systems didn’t work right so they had a cast member at the top to push the ride vehicles into the rotated position with their foot because the ride system wasn’t locking them in. Then at the bottom was another CM on a stool pushing the vehicle with their foot to lock it back in the other direction. This went on for a very long time after the attraction opened.

I agree. Certainly Spaceship Earth in 1982 had just as much demand as Rise has today. Heck, SSE is the first thing you see when you enter Epcot, and it is the icon of the park. While I imagine a sizable minority of DHS guests don't even realize that Rise exists and think the big ride is Millennium Falcon.
 

Twirlnhurl

Active Member
Essential, shmessential. It's an arbitrary designation. If Universal could continue construction why exactly couldn't Disney perform repairs?
In hindsight, Universal was probably right to continue construction, as their risk management strategies during the pandemic have been far more consistent throughout than Disney's. However, in mid-March, it was far from obvious what the correct move should be.
 

donsullivan

Premium Member
Essential, shmessential. It's an arbitrary designation. If Universal could continue construction why exactly couldn't Disney perform repairs?
Disney chose a very conservative approach to the safety of its employees back in March in every single part of the company. Those rules prevented anyone from entering any building during the shutdown except roles deemed essential such as security. That included all of the attraction buildings, construction sites, all of their office buildings around the US, etc.. In fact, most of the office space is still under those restrictions. Those constraints didn't start to loosen until June when they were preparing the construction and installation of all the distancing equipment thoughout the property in advance of the re-opening. Most of the Imagineering and construction teams were not back to work at that time and only started coming back in August.
 

rowrbazzle

Well-Known Member
In hindsight, Universal was probably right to continue construction, as their risk management strategies during the pandemic have been far more consistent throughout than Disney's. However, in mid-March, it was far from obvious what the correct move should be.
The right move regarding new or ongoing projects (delayed vs cancelled, etc) is one thing. The right move regarding the most popular ride in the park that was plagued by reliability issues seems pretty simple to me.
 

RSoxNo1

Well-Known Member
Every major E-Ticket, with new ride systems and technologies has always had a long test and adjust phase with reliability issues. We just didn’t live in a social media world where everyone in the world was instantly aware of the issues like they are today. This is absolutely not a new phenomenon- it has been happening for decades on new complex attractions.

I’ve referenced many times before the major issues they had with the ride system in Spaceship Earth. The rotation systems didn’t work right so they had a cast member at the top to push the ride vehicles into the rotated position with their foot because the ride system wasn’t locking them in. Then at the bottom was another CM on a stool pushing the vehicle with their foot to lock it back in the other direction. This went on for a very long time after the attraction opened.
Nothing has been as bad as Flight of Passage while remaining open.
 

gerarar

Well-Known Member
I’m pretty sure it was said before here that WDI wanted more time to fix and tune the ride, but Ops/TDP wanted to open it as soon as possible before the holidays, hence its early December opening.
 

techgeek

Well-Known Member
Every major E-Ticket, with new ride systems and technologies has always had a long test and adjust phase with reliability issues. We just didn’t live in a social media world where everyone in the world was instantly aware of the issues like they are today. This is absolutely not a new phenomenon- it has been happening for decades on new complex attractions.

I’ve referenced many times before the major issues they had with the ride system in Spaceship Earth. The rotation systems didn’t work right so they had a cast member at the top to push the ride vehicles into the rotated position with their foot because the ride system wasn’t locking them in. Then at the bottom was another CM on a stool pushing the vehicle with their foot to lock it back in the other direction. This went on for a very long time after the attraction opened.

I don’t ever debate, or necessarily fault, the need for a lengthy test and adjust. It goes with the territory.

I have two major issues with Rise.

First is an imagineering one: the capacity is massively under designed considering its broad appeal and intended headliner ‘mega-E’ status. Even in the best case scenario, only a fraction of the daily attendance of HS can ride.

Second is operationally. The boarding group system is a flawed execution of a problematic concept with a massive bias towards repeat visitors and the technologically literate. If it’s going to come down to a lottery, make it fair and open access. Don’t require your guests to have to interpret your own rules... which require arrival prior to the published park opening time, essentially require smartphone and app integration, and being aware of and hitting the right button within an 8 second window. Then, you still might spend all day waiting to ride. That’s literally insanity. How can that possibly be defended as a positive guest experience? Even FoP in its days of high demand FP and 180 minute standby lines still was always accessible.
 

FeelsSoGoodToBeBad

Active Member
Don’t require your guests to have to interpret your own rules... which require arrival prior to the published park opening time, essentially require smartphone and app integration, and being aware of and hitting the right button within an 8 second window. Then, you still might spend all day waiting to ride.
And now I'm yet again VERY grateful that I am a member of these forums or I would be just like every other ignorant guest, trying to score the near-impossible ticket on luck and connection speed.
 

marni1971

WDW History nut
Premium Member
And (to an extent) they got it.
Not enough obviously. They wanted another 4-6 weeks. Minimum.

The real blame lies with those who green lit such an ambitious attraction with a highly attractive IP to have such a low OHRC. Rise had the most B modes of any attraction to date. They knew it would be problematic if opened as it was. But higher ups okayed it.
 

EPCOT-O.G.

Well-Known Member
The boarding group system is a flawed execution of a problematic concept with a massive bias towards repeat visitors and the technologically literate. If it’s going to come down to a lottery, make it fair and open access. Don’t require your guests to have to interpret your own rules... which require arrival prior to the published park opening time, essentially require smartphone and app integration, and being aware of and hitting the right button within an 8 second window.

I saw this happen firsthand back in January. Nice elderly couple, wearing matching tennis type outfits, meandered over to the ride entrance. They were clearly interested in the experience and tried talking to the CM about riding. She couldn’t help, obviously, and tried explaining the reservation system. I could tell they were confused and disappointed but not emotionally so. I feel for people that just want to experience the parks and don’t have the tech savviness or the desire to keep up with the “rat race” aspect of things.
 

orky8

Well-Known Member
Given the state of the BG frenzy, I think a few things need to change. First, it shouldn't be fastest fingers/connections gets the BG. It should be a random lottery. Second, I think they need to pre-assign the lottery process so you know before showing up at DHS whether you will get a ride. Perhaps by say 5PM the day before, you have to enter your party in the lottery and you'll be notified if you receive a BG and what BG you received by say 6PM the day before. Third, for those staying onsite, perhaps with at least an 3-4 night stay, you are should be guaranteed a BG and you can sorta list your days of preference in advance and Disney will assign one to you. This way, you know when you go to DHS, that you will get a ride.

Or just scrap the whole concept altogether and go stand-by only and how long you are willing to wait determines who rides. The problem here is how to prevent people from continually showing up earlier and earlier. I will say, though, as someone with young children, I do not favor this alternative, but at least you can't argue with the equity of such a system.
 

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