• Welcome to the WDWMAGIC.COM Forums!
    Please take a look around, and feel free to sign up and join the community.You can use your Twitter or Facebook account to sign up, or register directly.

News Star Wars: Galaxy's Edge - Historical Construction/Impressions

lifeisgoodboy

Well-Known Member
Advertisement
I was sick all last week. I still recovering from it. Sorry if wasn't here. I am all caught up now reading your posts. I will try and post something tommorow.
 

SirWillow

Well-Known Member
But you're in a bar, the only one in the park, you are literally there to buy drinks. No one goes to Starbucks and buy 4 coffees, at least normal people ;). But in a bar, you can get people buying all night if the atmosphere is right for it. And Disney knows that, because they are only expanding bar areas in other areas of the resort like the hotels and DTD. But then the one place you provide drinks at DL, you turn it into a hole the wall. I don't understand the thinking personally.
I don't think you realized that you actually answered your own question.

As you say, many will hang around a bar for long periods of time, nursing several drinks and taking up a spot that prevents others from using the same spot. That's something that Disney does NOT want. They want people to come in, sample, then get out and make room for someone else to come in. Not occupy a place for a long period of time. So what's one way they can try to ensure that people are moving in and out at a steady rate? Make it a smaller place with a lower occupancy that encourages people to move along instead of staying around and lingering.
 

fctiger

Well-Known Member
I don't think you realized that you actually answered your own question.

As you say, many will hang around a bar for long periods of time, nursing several drinks and taking up a spot that prevents others from using the same spot. That's something that Disney does NOT want. They want people to come in, sample, then get out and make room for someone else to come in. Not occupy a place for a long period of time. So what's one way they can try to ensure that people are moving in and out at a steady rate? Make it a smaller place with a lower occupancy that encourages people to move along instead of staying around and lingering.
I guess to me that still doesn't make a lot of sense. People will be doing that anyway. And since its smaller, it just means more people will be standing around just waiting for a table. Ever been to Trader Sam's on a Saturday night? No one there ever seem encouraged to move on quickly even with a line of people out the door, but I digress. And I don't really understand if you don't want people lounging around then why bother making it a bar in the first place? But OK, none of it is a huge deal, they have their reasons and what you're saying make sense I guess. I just don't see the point if you are building a land that is designed to keep people lingering but then expect them to move through it fast.
 

nesboy43

Well-Known Member
The problem with this land that people have to realize is that Disney needs to build it for the long term, not just the crazy crowding of the first few years. In 10 years will the cantina need to have 200 people in there at a time? Probably not. Will the rides remain popular? Most likely. The shops, restaurants, and other "small details" of the land will be one and done experiences after the initial hype and excitement dies down.

Go to Forbidden Journey in Universal Studios Hollywood and you can see how you have to walk for miles in a giant queue that is empty and it seems like a waste. Building for only the initial demand is not the way to go.
 

Darkbeer1

Well-Known Member
But go to 3 Broomsticks, and the place is packed on Slow Days, same with Moe's Tavern.

Notice that DCA didn't close the Cove Bar during the Pixar Pier Conversion.

Bars are different than rides. They are designed to sit down, relax and spend time talking to others.

So yes, in 10 years, 200 seats will still probably not be enough seats for the Cantina.
 

BasiltheBatLord

Well-Known Member
The shops, restaurants, and other "small details" of the land will be one and done experiences after the initial hype and excitement dies down.
To play devil's advocate, isn't the wand experience thing still popular at Universal? I honestly don't know, so asking.

I think one of the biggest issues with this land is all that all the attractions etc. are themed after the sequel trilogy. A few years and decades down the line it's going to be as if they built a Star Wars land in the 2000's that was themed exclusively to the prequels and stayed that way forever. It's pretty wild to think about, but this land is now a core part of Disneyland FOREVER from here on, which is a big reason why theming a DL land after a specific IP and not a broader concept is a bad idea, even if its mega blockbuster timeless one like SW.
 

Touchdown

Well-Known Member
Also why in the world are they only offering the cookie with blue milk in the bar, everyone is going to want that accessory and flood the bar more.
 

Touchdown

Well-Known Member
It’s still super popular on Orlando. I had always vowed the only way I would buy one was if I was ever chosen for the show. Never thought I would but while I was there the day before the last Celebration of Harry Potter I ducked into one of the last wand fittings of the day. There was no kids in the show, I was chosen and am currently the proud owner of a English oak with dragon heartstring.

It’s a lot of fun to do the magic windows (especially in Diagonal Alley) and I usually spend one morning (when there is never a line) a trip doing them. I also look foreword to letting my nephew borrow one when he is old enough.
 

SirWillow

Well-Known Member
But go to 3 Broomsticks, and the place is packed on Slow Days, same with Moe's Tavern.
...
So yes, in 10 years, 200 seats will still probably not be enough seats for the Cantina.
Three Broomsticks is still packed with lines waiting to get in on slow days in Florida as well. So are many of the shops. That whole area is constantly busy, and it's one area that you wouldn't know a slow day was one except for the shorter lines for the Potter rides.

To play devil's advocate, isn't the wand experience thing still popular at Universal? I honestly don't know, so asking.
The two times that we wanted to do the wand show at Olivanders in the last year and a half, that's what we rope dropped. (We used the Universal Express pass for the rides). On days in mid January and February, when the park was slow, it had a 30 minute wait for it when we came out, and later on in the day it was posted at 45 minutes.

If Potter is any indication of what SW:GE is going to be like, all of it is going to be busy for years to come. Every bit of it.
 

mickEblu

Well-Known Member
You know I’m starting to feel really unappreciated by Disney. With all the time we spend talking about Disneyland and all the money we spend there- no invite? Feels like a very one sided relationship. It’s like when you watch your team lose and you re really upset but then see on TMZ they were out partying the same night, parking at the fancy restaurant in their Ferrari.
 

lifeisgoodboy

Well-Known Member

Darkbeer1

Well-Known Member
N
I'm going on 5/21. Not bragging, just saying. Well, OK, I'm bragging. A little. OK, a lot. NEENER, NEENER, NEENER, press corps!!!
At more than one press event I was invited to, I also had VIP invites and/or industrial guest credentials. And it put me in some strange situations.

One is how the different tiers are treated, one is the meals. The VIP spread is much nicer than the press. As for the industrial folks, they are mainly still working and don't have time to eat.

But then came the events, where I had to take photos from the camera platform, but also sometimes be in front of it. That was taken care of by some great people, sometimes someone would use my camera, sometimes they broke the "wall" and called me out while standing with the press,

And then there were the interviews. Many times, I did mine for the most part in advance, so I could just release it right after the event. This came in handy, as sometimes I had to be interviewed by others.

It was interesting to say the least. a challenge, but a fun one.

So, OM, be proud of your NEENER, but remember, a few of the press was at the first CM event.
 

THE 1HAPPY HAUNT

Well-Known Member
N


At more than one press event I was invited to, I also had VIP invites and/or industrial guest credentials. And it put me in some strange situations.

One is how the different tiers are treated, one is the meals. The VIP spread is much nicer than the press. As for the industrial folks, they are mainly still working and don't have time to eat.

But then came the events, where I had to take photos from the camera platform, but also sometimes be in front of it. That was taken care of by some great people, sometimes someone would use my camera, sometimes they broke the "wall" and called me out while standing with the press,

And then there were the interviews. Many times, I did mine for the most part in advance, so I could just release it right after the event. This came in handy, as sometimes I had to be interviewed by others.

It was interesting to say the least. a challenge, but a fun one.

So, OM, be proud of your NEENER, but remember, a few of the press was at the first CM event.
Are you two done comparing who has the larger exclusivity??? Afterall everyone knows It's not the size of your back stage access but how you use it. Boys will be boys.
 
Top Bottom