Page 178 - 181 off topic posts from thread: On layoffs, very bad attendance, and Iger's legacy being one of disgrace

Sirwalterraleigh

Premium Member
It absolutely matters for grad/professional school applications. They often weigh GPAs differently based on the school from which it was received (I know this firsthand from someone who was involved in the admissions process for a law school).

With that said, the standardized test score generally matters the most. The undergrad degree is going to be more of a tiebreaker for close cases than anything else.
I think you’re intent on dying on this hill, Sgt. Elias 😉
Definitely true. The only time I care about the school (or honestly if they even went to college) is if I need someone with a masters or phd for very specialized positions. Without that need, it's basically a checkbox at most.

Honestly, I think we've done society a disservice by making people think that a college degree is a must. I tend to think that vocational schools or work co-op would be fine for many people. I've got about 30 people working for me, and the lowest paid person makes over $120k/year. Two of the best people I've got don't have a degree.

I hire younger engineers. The school is an afterthought in 90% or more of the cases. It’s any job/applied experience that really stands out. And if they communicate/respond to questions in an actual personal interaction.

The higher education model irrevocably shifted when manufacturing started to collapse. There needs to be “strata” in a middle class society. Forcing everyone into high cost degrees without direct application or positions available has been a long, bloated game. Just my opinion.
 
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Sirwalterraleigh

Premium Member
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There should absolutely be more vocational schools and less people going for 4 year liberal arts degrees. I think Europe handles that much better.
Agree...artisans, craftsman, tradesman...these things never need go out of style.

Again...Star Trek 🤪
 

Heppenheimer

Well-Known Member
There should absolutely be more vocational schools and less people going for 4 year liberal arts degrees. I think Europe handles that much better.
When I get a chance (am at work now), I'll relate the sad story of why an American manufacturing firm was gradually shifting most of their production to the village where I happened to live in Germany at the time. In short... they couldn't grow their business in the US because they required skilled labor that they were gradually losing to attrition and couldn't find (or train) enough replacements to keep the US factory viable.

Plenty of tradesmen who own their business around where I live now have told me the same thing (well, they're not planning a move to Germany). They just can't find the help they need and the current generation isn't training enough.
 

CaptainAmerica

Premium Member
When I get a chance (am at work now), I'll relate the sad story of why an American manufacturing firm was gradually shifting most of their production to the village where I happened to live in Germany for a few years. In short... they couldn't grow their business in the US because they required skilled labor that they were gradually losing to attrition and couldn't find (or train) enough replacements to keep the US factory viable.

Plenty of tradesmen who own their business around where I live now have told me the same thing (well, they're not planning a move to Germany). They just can't find the help they need and the current generation isn't training enough.
My dad works in a factory where you start as a trainee in the warehouse making $32,000 with the opportunity to earn more with overtime or night shifts. After six months, you move into your permanent job where you make $70,000+. Absolutely no skills, certifications, or trades required. The ONLY requirements are that you show up on time, sober, and stay awake for the duration of the shift. They can't stay staffed with people who meet those requirements.
 

ImperfectPixie

Well-Known Member
My dad works in a factory where you start as a trainee in the warehouse making $32,000 with the opportunity to earn more with overtime or night shifts. After six months, you move into your permanent job where you make $70,000+. Absolutely no skills, certifications, or trades required. The ONLY requirements are that you show up on time, sober, and stay awake for the duration of the shift. They can't stay staffed with people who meet those requirements.
Part of the problem too, is that many Americans have shifted away from respecting a plain old, honest day's work. There's nothing at all wrong with working in a trade or manufacturing or whatever job as long as you're able to make a living at it. Having spent most of my life working with my hands, there's a massive amount of satisfaction that comes from taking one thing and making it into something else.
 

Nubs70

Well-Known Member
I think you’re intent on dying on this hill, Sgt. Elias 😉


I hire younger engineers. The school is an afterthought in 90% or more of the cases. It’s any job/applied experience that really stands out. And if they communicate/respond to questions in an actual personal interaction.

The higher education model irrevocably shifted when manufacturing started to collapse. There needs to be “strata” in a middle class society. Forcing everyone into high cost degrees without direct application or positions available has been a long, bloated game. Just my opinion.
The German post high-school education system addresses this by putting children on an educational path at Grade 4. At the end of grade 4 you are placed on 1 of 3 paths.

Path 1 is vocational school after highschool
Path 2 is Community College after highschool
Path 3 is University after highschool.

Path 1 results in blue collar skills
Path 2 results in middle management
Path 3 is senior management/execituve/academia.

Not everyone in Germany has the opportunity to go to college. Your rung on the ladder of life is determined at Grade 4.
 

eliza61nyc

Well-Known Member
Part of the problem too, is that many Americans have shifted away from respecting a plain old, honest day's work. There's nothing at all wrong with working in a trade or manufacturing or whatever job as long as you're able to make a living at it. Having spent most of my life working with my hands, there's a massive amount of satisfaction that comes from taking one thing and making it into something else.
Also remember though IP, is that we moved a lot of the manufacturing out of this country.
Case in point, I grew up in NYC during a time when we made a lot of clothing in the states. NYC had an a actual Garment district. tailors. seamstress, shoe repairs etc etc. gone.
Philadelphia is struggling with this still, the poorest big city in the country. Train manufacturers, textile, beer all big manufacturing. (not the only issue but it help)
I went to undergrad in Pittsburgh after the steel industry went to hell. it was horrible, although I will say I have heard the city has rebounded.
Now I started my career in the oil refinery business, the last refinery on the east coast just shut down (in Philadelphia). it was the last place where you could come straight out of high school, get an operator position and easily make 65-70K a year and go up from there.


Now I'm in chemical R&D, pretty much all the positions require a degree.
 
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ImperfectPixie

Well-Known Member
Also remember though IP, is that we moved a lot of the manufacturing out of this country.
Case in point, I grew up in NYC during a time when we made a lot of clothing in the states. NYC had an a actual Garment district. tailors. seamstress, shoe repairs etc etc. gone.
Philadelphia is struggling with this still, the poorest big city in the country. Train manufacturers, textile, beer all big manufacturing. (not the only issue but it help)
I went to undergrad in Pittsburgh after the steel industry went to hell. it was horrible, although I will say I have heard the city has rebounded.
Now I started my career in the oil refinery business, the last refinery on the east coast just shut down (in Philadelphia). it was the last place where you could come straight out of high school, get an operator position and easily make 65-70K a year and go up from there.


Now I'm in chemical R&D, pretty much all the positions require a degree.
Yup. It's quite sad.
 

_caleb

Well-Known Member
Part of the problem too, is that many Americans have shifted away from respecting a plain old, honest day's work.
I‘ve actually seen the opposite. Lots of people stuck trying to scratch out a living in the so-called “gig economy” these days, driving for Uber, delivering take-out/groceries, etc. All while still going to school and starting their own businesses and non-profits.
 

CaptainAmerica

Premium Member
I‘ve actually seen the opposite. Lots of people stuck trying to scratch out a living in the so-called “gig economy” these days, driving for Uber, delivering take-out/groceries, etc. All while still going to school and starting their own businesses and non-profits.
Where do you live? That's almost entirely an urban phenomenon (including all of California).
 

Touchdown

Well-Known Member
Wish I knew about this place when I was looking for a school way back when. That sounds like a fun place!

I believe this poster if referring to the exploits of Dr Venkman, Spengler and Stantz which would mean the University in question is Columbia, but I can’t be sure as their experiments with goo occurred after they were kicked off the faculty and went into an ill fated extermination business.
 

lazyboy97o

Well-Known Member
I believe this poster if referring to the exploits of Dr Venkman, Spengler and Stantz which would mean the University in question is Columbia, but I can’t be sure as their experiments with goo occurred after they were kicked off the faculty and went into an ill fated extermination business.


 
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