Page 178 - 181 off topic posts from thread: On layoffs, very bad attendance, and Iger's legacy being one of disgrace

M:SpilotISTC12

Well-Known Member
Original Poster
I can't speak to the bankruptcies, but it's possible (likely) to buy quite a nice home for $500,000 or less in much of the state. Spitting distance of NY or on the shore? Perhaps not, but where I live in Monmouth County ( a wealthy county), $500k is not getting you a fixer upper but a decent home.

For the reverse, $600k or so will get you my step-mother's 1959 double split level, which you will then raze and replace with a McMansion. But you'll be 20 minutes closer to the water and on a train line for NYC so no need to take the bus. :)

With regard to anecdotal Disney support, several DVC members in our area might go to Disney if restrictions were lifted, but I'm surprised at how COVID shy people are. The general assumption seems to be "the world will kill you." I wouldn't be surprised if there is some shell-shock going on in NJ, which makes me think travel will take awhile to come back - vaccine awhile.
I also live in Monmouth county. I bought my house for 200K. It’s small but it’s nice. The value of my house has gone up just because people are leaving the city and buying property down the shore. It makes sense that people would want to move to NJ from NYC especially if they work from home 4 days a week and go into the office once a week. Foreclosures in this state are nowhere near 2008 levels.

Now as a DVC owner as well, we would have gone if I didn’t have to spend 2 weeks quarantining just after getting back before I go back to work. I can’t just can’t swing that for work. Also my wife is 6 months pregnant so maybe going into the epicenter of the virus might not be the best idea either. 😂 I’m renting out the next two years our points until this over and our kid gets a bit older.
 

MissingDisney

Well-Known Member
This is definitely a concern for us, too. There has been very close monitoring of enrolment numbers and no-one is entirely sure how many will show up. That concern is rolled into the preoccupation with the experience of freshmen/first years such that they can be convinced to still enrol. Another wrinkle is the travel involved, which for us means students from other parts of the EU but in the US means students from other parts of the country having to relocate, pay for accommodation, etc. It's hard to convince them or us it's necessary for them to do this when everything is likely to be online anyway. We're also not supposed to be doing long-distance learning, however, and ideally in-person learning will be phased in as possible. In the US, I think that whole ecosystem is a big part of the push to start on-campus teaching this coming semester.

As a lecturer, this makes me kind of happy as it provides some recognition that it is worthwhile keeping us employed rather than just recording lectures or reducing higher education to a handful of elite on-campus institutions and a slightly lower tier marketing online courses to the world. It is not great for students or universities, though.

Honestly, if a student could defer the upcoming semester I would find it hard to advise them not to.


For some fields, it's simply impossible not to have some on-campus education. However, even that is being curtailed. I've heard stories from colleagues about labs shutting due to COVID outbreaks in several countries now.
He was very torn as his heart has been set for years on attending his favorite school. Getting accepted was one of his academic motivators since middle school and his hard work paid off. But realistically, it just didn’t make sense. And in full disclosure, it was his academic advisor at the university that encouraged him to defer and worked out a community college transfer approval for him. He said they’ll be waiting with open arms 6 or 12 months from now and a safe environment was best at this time. I really appreciated him helping my son.
 

HongKongFooy

Well-Known Member
They wear masks in Tokyo and other parts of Asia in just as hot weather and no one there complains.


Why should they.........

They have the 2nd best noodles in the world, 4th or maybe 3rd prettiest women, drive the most reliable cars, board immaculate and timely trains, enjoy cuteness("kawaii") everywhere, play with the best toys on the planet.......... but most of all get to ride Journey To The Center Of The Earth and Watch Shiriki Utundo vanish instantaneously.

If I had that on a daily basis I'd find it hard to complain about most anything also, including the dreaded mask.
 

WDW Pro

Well-Known Member
Why should they.........

They have the 2nd best noodles in the world, 4th or maybe 3rd prettiest women, drive the most reliable cars, board immaculate and timely trains, enjoy cuteness("kawaii") everywhere, play with the best toys on the planet.......... but most of all get to ride Journey To The Center Of The Earth and Watch Shiriki Utundo vanish instantaneously.

If I had that on a daily basis I'd find it hard to complain about most anything also, including the dreaded mask.

Never thought I'd see women objectified along with noodles and reliable cars, but there it is.
 

UNCgolf

Well-Known Member
I went down the rabbit hole and looked at the rankings (haven’t in decades - thankfully)...and I noticed how heavily those rankings are weighted private now. Not so in the past. Way more “football schools” back when.

You forgot Georgia Tech and Wake Forest and BC in your list 😉

I’m proud to say I got in to 3 of the top 30...and didn’t go to any of them 😂

Shout out to Pomona College! Frank wells and Roy E Disney.

Wake Forest is private! And tiny. I think Boston College may be private too, but not sure about that.

I also got into 3 of the top 30 (at the time, don't know how they're ranked now) but I did choose to attend one, for better or worse. No complaints from me though; I loved it.
 

Sirwalterraleigh

Premium Member
Also, we have learned a lot about Covid in the last 6 months and because of that mortality has greatly improved, we should never get to New York numbers again. Florida is currently the 17th worst state in deaths when adjusted for population, but with its death recordings occurring at over 100 per day will likely continue to climb in that ranking. Beating New York is not a victory for Florida, they used to be one of the best states for mortality (top ten) until this spike. It’s not a good look.

New York had to fight the battle. Those that didn’t seem to have decided they had been “better” by default and made the sacrifices look wasted.

Lest we forget: cases are 4x the number and deaths have doubled since New York stemmed it’s Tide.
 
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Heppenheimer

Well-Known Member
But you got it.

I totally understand...took me 20 years to make sense of that nonsensical term 😂
It is understood in PA as well.

The concept is simple. The "shore" is the series of barrier islands and the towns that occupy them off the coast of New Jersey. The thin strip of sandy land that border the ocean on these islands is the beach, not the entire island. You go "down the shore" when you leave your normal home and drive to one of these towns, which is usually at least a week-long stay. You "go to the beach" when you are already in the shore town and actually walk to the physical beach.
 

M:SpilotISTC12

Well-Known Member
Original Poster
It is understood in PA as well.

The concept is simple. The "shore" is the series of barrier islands and the towns that occupy them off the coast of New Jersey. The thin strip of sandy land that border the ocean on these islands is the beach, not the entire island. You go "down the shore" when you leave your normal home and drive to one of these towns, which is usually at least a week-long stay. You "go to the beach" when you are already in the shore town and actually walk to the physical beach.
 

Sirwalterraleigh

Premium Member
It is understood in PA as well.

The concept is simple. The "shore" is the series of barrier islands and the towns that occupy them off the coast of New Jersey. The thin strip of sandy land that border the ocean on these islands is the beach, not the entire island. You go "down the shore" when you leave your normal home and drive to one of these towns, which is usually at least a week-long stay. You "go to the beach" when you are already in the shore town and actually walk to the physical beach.
Yeah...I’ve got it...still nobody else on earth calls it that.
 

Heppenheimer

Well-Known Member
Yeah...I’ve got it...still nobody else on earth calls it that.
Regionalisms. Nobody outside of Wisconsin calls a water fountain a "bubbler", yet here were are.

For the way most people in the region visit the Jersey shore, I think its a useful phrase and "beach vs. shore" distinction.
 

Sirwalterraleigh

Premium Member
Regionalisms. Nobody outside of Wisconsin calls a water fountain a "bubbler", yet here were are.

For the way most people in the region visit the Jersey shore, I think its a useful phrase and "beach vs. shore" distinction.
In practice...”shore” tends to be anything within miles of water where people trek to have fun...

It’s not so academically defined.
 

Sirwalterraleigh

Premium Member
When seeking growth in portfolio or simply maintaining wealth at near zero interest rates:

Savings accounts are not viable.
Municipal bonds are dangerous with municipality debt loads.
Treasury bonds make no money.
Traditional stocks are sketchy with storm clouds on the horizon

This forces investment money into tech. With Dow and Nasdaq heavily weighted in tech, the fed imposed inertia of near zero interest rates and diluted money supply forces investment into tech inorder to maintain or grow one's investment. Therefore, as the stock market grows, the foundation is being eroded.
Right...the stock market is rigged...layman’s terms 😉
 

CaptainAmerica

Premium Member
When seeking growth in portfolio or simply maintaining wealth at near zero interest rates:

Savings accounts are not viable.
Municipal bonds are dangerous with municipality debt loads.
Treasury bonds make no money.
Traditional stocks are sketchy with storm clouds on the horizon

This forces investment money into tech. With Dow and Nasdaq heavily weighted in tech, the fed imposed inertia of near zero interest rates and diluted money supply forces investment into tech inorder to maintain or grow one's investment. Therefore, as the stock market grows, the foundation is being eroded.
I wasn't making a sophisticated case, I just want another stimulus check. Aulani 2021 isn't going to pay for itself and the flight from Boston to Honolulu is damn expensive for a family of five.
 

Sirwalterraleigh

Premium Member
On a related note...I see king of the world Elon musk is doing a 5:1 stock split in a few weeks. Apple is doing a 4:1....Incase anyone wants in on that monopoly action?
 

MaximumEd

Well-Known Member
When seeking growth in portfolio or simply maintaining wealth at near zero interest rates:

Savings accounts are not viable.
Municipal bonds are dangerous with municipality debt loads.
Treasury bonds make no money.
Traditional stocks are sketchy with storm clouds on the horizon

This forces investment money into tech. With Dow and Nasdaq heavily weighted in tech, the fed imposed inertia of near zero interest rates and diluted money supply forces investment into tech inorder to maintain or grow one's investment. Therefore, as the stock market grows, the foundation is being eroded.

Either you are correct, or both you and my financial guy are both wrong as he said basically the same thing to me yesterday.
 

brianstl

Well-Known Member
When I say elite, I mean generally recognized as elite by the public as a whole. In rankings (which you could argue are meaningless) but more importantly in hiring status. Companies look more favorably upon degrees from UNC, UCLA, Michigan, UVA, and the other so-called "Public Ivies" than they do from other public universities.

But who knows what will happen.
Who you know and where the person hiring went to school are always more important as you move up the ladder than where you graduated from college ranks. The reason why "Public Ivies" graduates have more success getting jobs is because they have, for the most part, some of the largest alumni networks in the country. UCSB is among the top five public universities in the country, but it won't help you coming out of college like a UNC, Texas or Wisconsin because it doesn't have the same kind of alumni network.
 
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