On layoffs, very bad attendance, and Iger's legacy being one of disgrace

mkt

Maleante Izquierdozo
Premium Member
I now regret opening this can of worms by mentioning that my 19 year old self found some of the female CMs pretty...

My 19 year old self dated some of them.

My current 37 year old self is still friends with some of them.

It's ok.
 

The_Jobu

Well-Known Member
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Check out also Seminole State College, Rolllins College, Brevard College, Polk State College, and Stetson University. They're a bit further out, but not so far that WDW day trips are out of the question. Really, any institution of higher education within a two hour drive should be good, so that should open anything from Palm Beach County to St Johns County on the east coast, Sarasota County to Levy County on the west, and Alachua County to Highlands County in the middle of the state. That's a LOT of potential, good luck.

There's so many colleges/universities in the US, I dont know how you guys keep track of it all! I got a contract for this school year, but I'll definitely keep this list for 2021, thanks!
 

Piebald

Well-Known Member
Many moons ago. There was a Time magazine article called "The Death of Equities". They were so wrong to try convince people about the ills of the market.
Mate, I dont disagree with your sentiments, but school is very expensive now. There is no "just work through school bro!" anymore. I consider myself to still be young (34) but even I dont have the audacity to tell kids school is affordable now because I escaped without loans (also my parents helped me which I came to find out is not the norm).

I'm actually starting school soon (go Noles!) because my work is paying everything. Otherwise I wouldnt even entertain the idea. And I'm in Florida where school is cheap. Its outrageous and I imagine a ton of schools will be hurting this fall if kids have to do online school. Why pay for the semester at UF when you can just take the classes at your local community college?
 

flynnibus

Premium Member
I was recently wondering why I never even knew about the College Program while I was an undergrad. I would have totally jumped at the chance to take a semester away from the academic hellscape and stress. I figured that maybe my university was too snooty to bring in something like a vocationally-oriented "internship" recruiter, but I guess Disney simply didn't target my school for recruiting.

Never heard of it at our school either. But when I was really down and depressed over school and struggling to stay the course, instead of seeking out Mickey Mouse, I went to the career center and looking into work co-op programs. I would work for a semester , then go back to school, etc. Sent out a ton of resumes... no call backs... but I did get one. I went and interviewed, and got hired. Decades later I'm still in that very field... a technology space I had zero awareness of before I even applied to that job. I turned a co-op position into a regular part time position... and then into a full time position.

First two summers I did the 'bored student' thing working at home or the beach. But beyond that I was working to pay bills, take summer classes, or was working my new career job path. By 24, I had a house, kids, married, cars, etc. And I was never the boilerroom 'gotta get ahead' guy.. I simply recognized the importance of 'investing' into something for the longer haul. For me that was the program I was in during school.. I was burned out.. but it was all about avg starting salary for people with those degrees. I bypassed that even with luck in my co-op.

I think now there is so much emphasis on 'job placement' the market for interships and coops is much harder. Unless you were pre-med... or maybe architecture or public service... very few had any motivation to pursue interships prior to graduating. All the pre-med people had to work for free as interns... while I was making 2x minimum wage as a co-op and turned that into almost 4x minimum wage within 9 months. Now a days things are so flooded I'm sure people are willing be slaves anywhere to get some resume building.
 

Calmdownnow

Well-Known Member
I now regret opening this can of worms by mentioning that my 19 year old self found some of the female CMs pretty...
That's all right -- my 7 year old niece told one of the Ugly Sisters that she wasn't ugly, she was pretty, Should I speculate about her future sexual orientation? The cast member had to "break character" to give her a hug and say thank you...
 
So I want to put my two cents in here as well. The general sense I get from most of us is that we’re pretty successful, well-off, and can afford to go to Disney when we wish.

In saying that, there’s been a lot of pity posts about the frontline cast members and the feeling of “why don’t they just get their life together” / “working a carnival rise isn’t a job”. But maybe I can offer you this viewpoint...there’s a bell curve to success and motivation/drive of people. If everyone were as motivated and driven as most of us are on this forum, then the bell curve would just become skinnier, but it would still be bell curve. And there would still be an average and people on the lower quartiles.

My story goes that I was a ****-up. Partied way to much in college and failed classes. I was working dead end jobs, but a switched flipped in me when I was around 26 and I decided to get my **** together. I’m now 32 and pretty much everyday since then I’ve worked and grinded my butt off and I have a job that pays well and one that I like.

My frustration until recently was similar to CaptainAmerica’s. I would see people “wasting their lives” like I was. And knowing how easy it is to change, just that it requires a lot of hard work.

But reading through all these posts, you can’t force or change anyone to do anything. Seeing people perform below their potential frustrates me...it does. But in the end, it’s up to them to change. Just be happy that most of us seem to be on the upper end of the success bell curve.
 

NelsonRD

Well-Known Member
Unfortunately, as much as I empathize with those people, staying at your company is usually the worst way to get ahead. I guess I’m not really sure how it works in retail or fast food; but at least in a corporate environment, changing jobs and/or companies is the quickest and easiest way to be rewarded financially.

I understand, but there becomes a point where if you change jobs too often, it begins to look bad.
Also, there is a difference between changing jobs as stepping stones, contracts change, maintaining and learning new skills, or a host of other professional reasons. I am arguing about quitting jobs routinely, taking a parallel job, and thinking somehow it will be different this time around.

People do not leave bad companies, they leave bad bosses.
 

Nubs70

Well-Known Member
So I want to put my two cents in here as. The general sense I get from most of us is that we’re pretty successful, well-off, and can afford to go to Disney when we wish.

In saying that, there’s been a lot of pity posts about the frontline cast members and the feeling of “why don’t they just get their life together” / “working a carnival rise isn’t a job”. But maybe I can offer you this viewpoint...there’s a bell curve to success and motivation/drive of people. If everyone were as motivated and driven as most of us are on this forum, then the bell curve would just become skinnier, but it would still be bell curve. And there would still be an average and people on the lower quartiles.

My story goes that I was a ****-up. Partied way to much in college and failed classes. I was working dead end jobs, but a switched flipped in me when I was around 26 and I decided to get my **** together. I’m now 32 and pretty much everyday since then I’ve worked and grinder my butt off and I have a job that pays well and one that I like.

My frustration until recently was similar to CaptainAmerica’s. I would see people “wasting their lives” like I was. And knowing how easy it is to change, just that it requires a lot of hard work.

But reading through all these posts, you can’t force or change anyone to do anything. Seeing people perform below their potential frustrates me...it does. But in the end, it’s up to them to change. Just be happy that most of us seem to be on the upper end of the success bell curve.
My story was very similar. Partied too much in college, worked dead end jobs. Until one day working a ski lift, a light bulb went off and realized this is no way I want to live the rest of my life. I buckled down, found a program of interest with great scholarships and fought my way through. Not that life has been easy since, but it takes that light bulb moment.
 

UNCgolf

Well-Known Member
Paying off loan debt faster? , go to a public university rather than private. Less loans to pay off. Feeling adventurous and want to serve your country? Go the ROTC route and free college. I worked through school, winter , summer break and didn't make excuses and put on my big boy pants. I'm glad I took investing classes in school and started early.

Even public universities are far more expensive than they used to be. 4 years at a good public university (as an in-state student; if you're out-of-state the costs often aren't really different than going private) can still easily cost you 60k+.

If you're going to graduate school, well, that's where things can really ramp up. You often don't have the time to work a side job even if you wanted to.
 

Heppenheimer

Well-Known Member
In saying that, there’s been a lot of pity posts about the frontline cast members and the feeling of “why don’t they just get their life together” / “working a carnival ride isn’t a job”. But maybe I can offer you this viewpoint...there’s a bell curve to success and motivation/drive of people. If everyone were as motivated and driven as most of us are on this forum, then the bell curve would just become skinnier, but it would still be bell curve. And there would still be an average and people on the lower quartiles.
Well, it is technically a job. But it isn't a profession, and therein lies the difference.

Which got me thinking... I'm guessing Disney employs a small army of skilled technicians and tradesmen to keep the rides running and/or fix/trouble-shoot breakdowns, and I imagine these guys make a fairly decent salary. Does experience as a front-line CM ever lead to learning these trades and coming back at a higher salary? I would think this could offer a way forward for the otherwise dead-end service jobs.
 

NelsonRD

Well-Known Member
But being miserable and poor is? Ok... *rolleyes*

hey @mkt , @BigThunderMatt - sorry you were just the ones that make up the lower side of 'average' according to Nelson here... sorry you lost the lotto ;)

Sorry NelsonRD - not all companies are great places to work. Employees need to learn to spot the tells and cut and run. Not just hope if they grind it out... somehow the tigger will change it's stripes.

I said nothing of staying content and miserable. I suggested that companies like Disney routinely post positions that can be applied for, that provides a path towards upward mobility that is better than quitting a job, and starting over, and over, and over, where you are not changing anything except your environment.

America is equal opportunity, not equal outcome.

How many rejection letters from Disney did Randy Pausch get? Taking your advice, he should have just quit right?
 

tirian

Well-Known Member
That's all right -- my 7 year old niece told one of the Ugly Sisters that she wasn't ugly, she was pretty, Should I speculate about her future sexual orientation? The cast member had to "break character" to give her a hug and say thank you...
I assume your daughter is a compassionate person. Some of the stepsisters are also friends with princesses; it’s all about the makeup.
 

flynnibus

Premium Member
Which got me thinking... I'm guessing Disney employs a small army of skilled technicians and tradesmen to keep the rides running and/or fix/trouble-shoot breakdowns, and I imagine these guys make a fairly decent salary. Does experience as a front-line CM ever lead to learning these trades and coming back at a higher salary? I would think this could offer a way forward for the otherwise dead-end service jobs.

You have skilled labor jobs - and often many of those are in trade unions. But then this is where the general 'FL wages suck' element comes in. You can be the greater plumber at Disney... but you're still gonna be compensated worse than alot of other places in the country. Decide if 'working for the rat' is worth that tradeoff.

The path you are talking about is some of the professional internships people try to get.. moving into the black shirt tech area is another one that seems to lure many CP age people.

But again.. its like "oh I work show lighting..." and they think its great - but they are still getting paid like crap compared to people working elsewhere.

Disney knows people still repeat the old "having Disney on your resume..." spiel... and take a tax for it.
 

tirian

Well-Known Member
How many rejection letters from Disney did Randy Pausch get? Taking your advice, he should have just quit right?
Considering they finally used him for awful, headache-inducing crap in DisneyQuest...yes. ;)

They obviously didn’t know what to do with him, and he’s my number one example of how WDI doesn’t try to recruit the best and brightest anymore. It’s not Walt’s MAPO c.1960s.
 
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The_Jobu

Well-Known Member
Can we officially rename this thread “life stories of people who have nothing better to do than post their life story on a Disney fan page and pretend their life is better than the average Disney CM?”

It all began one cold October night in 1983. I entered the world unceremoniously held upside down by a obstetrician in downtown Toronto. Little did I know that that slap on the *** was just the motivation I needed to make my voice heard in the world. The next day, I started my career...
 

TrainChasers

Well-Known Member
But again.. its like "oh I work show lighting..." and they think its great - but they are still getting paid like crap compared to people working elsewhere.

And more than people elsewhere. Disney lighting pays a lot more than Branson and Pigeon Forge. But less than other areas.

Also... lighting at Disney is watching a smpte clock on MA. How exciting! (But getting paid to watch said clock is a pretty easy gig not going to argue that.)
 
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