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Not Disney...but will probably impact Disney

flynnibus

Well-Known Member
This lawsuit won't go anywhere with regards to signage

1) They say the father didn't speak english - but was he traveling alone? No. Did someone else help arrange for his trip to the park? (most certainly). Those people would have responsibility in part for helping him navigate and decide what to do.
2) The park provides services to non-english speakers in their foreign language already - Like Disney, they provide language specific brochures and park maps at entrances and guest relations
3) The team members (like Disney Cast Members) are already trained in how to handle non english speakers and have a system to connecting them with workers who can assist them in native language

The signage issue is just one justification the family is noting for their wrongful death suit. I imagine Universal would settle this case quietly since the guy died and just bury it vs spending money to fight it... and no changes will come because of it. The lawyers always try to find a reason to file their suit...
 

eliza61nyc

Well-Known Member
Advertisement
Imagine this was in Japanese. You wouldn't be able to understand the word "warning," let alone anything else. The pictograms are mystifying if you look at them by themselves. And who are you going to ask if you speak a language different from the CM standing there?
???

The pictograms are pretty clear IMO. I think that's why a lot of warnings are switching over to pictures
 

nickys

Premium Member
How many languages are needed? You could make an argument for Spanish, French, German, Traditional Chinese, Simplified Chinese, Japanese, Russian, Arabic, Swahili, Catalonian, Gaelic, and Samoan.

Family Sues Universal Because Warning Signs are only in English
Gaelic? Really?????

There are around 57,000 Gaelic speakers in Scotland, and about 32,000 of them can read and/or write the language. I love watching Gaelic versions of kids programmes, but I can’t understand more than about 10 words.

How on earth do you make a case for signs in Gaelic? Let alone Swahili or Russian. I would think Portuguese though would be useful, given it’s the most common language in South America.

Now if you’re including the Irish Gaelic, I think there’s maybe twice that number who speak it as their first language. Even then, it’s hard to make a case for it in Florida!
 

SirWillow

Well-Known Member
I know that when I went to Disney Paris earlier this year, I prepared as if no one there was going to speak English (even though I knew there would be some) I made sure to get brochures in English and look up other information in English.

What I found interesting was a definite culture there that if you did something stupid- like ride a ride you shouldn't because you couldn't be bothered to figure out the warnings- then it was your own dumb fault and to bad. Watched a kid climb a part of a play ground they shouldn't, get one warning, then when they fell it was a, *shrug* "oh well, you were warned." They weren't hurt really, but certainly not the worries about lawsuits for guest misdeeds that there is here.

While I know (sadly from lots of experience) that many guests can't be bothered to educate themselves on even simple things, and language can create some barriers, it's also impossible for the parks to cover every single instance like this. And if someone is going to be riding rides in languages that aren't native to the culture, it should be upon the guest/ rider to educated and figure out if they can ride. But our legal system doesn't always see it that way.

BTW, in this specific case the ride isn't remotely at fault. They guy had a heart condition and the ride had nothing to do with it except be in the local where he apparently had issues. It's a money grab by the family.
 

Pooh.sHoneyHuntTDL

Well-Known Member
I know that when I went to Disney Paris earlier this year, I prepared as if no one there was going to speak English (even though I knew there would be some) I made sure to get brochures in English and look up other information in English.

What I found interesting was a definite culture there that if you did something stupid- like ride a ride you shouldn't because you couldn't be bothered to figure out the warnings- then it was your own dumb fault and to bad. Watched a kid climb a part of a play ground they shouldn't, get one warning, then when they fell it was a, *shrug* "oh well, you were warned." They weren't hurt really, but certainly not the worries about lawsuits for guest misdeeds that there is here.

While I know (sadly from lots of experience) that many guests can't be bothered to educate themselves on even simple things, and language can create some barriers, it's also impossible for the parks to cover every single instance like this. And if someone is going to be riding rides in languages that aren't native to the culture, it should be upon the guest/ rider to educated and figure out if they can ride. But our legal system doesn't always see it that way.

BTW, in this specific case the ride isn't remotely at fault. They guy had a heart condition and the ride had nothing to do with it except be in the local where he apparently had issues. It's a money grab by the family.
Yeah, it's not like this is a very intense ride. This isn't Hulk.
 

Dad 2 M & M

Well-Known Member
Gaelic? Really?????

How on earth do you make a case for signs in Gaelic? Let alone Swahili or Russian. I would think Portuguese though would be useful, given it’s the most common language in South America.
Obrigado e bem feito.....amazing how many peeps think Spanish is the only language spoken in South America......
 

ChanceH

Active Member
People will use any stepping stone for money now days. Yeah feel for the family the guy died but you can’t tell me he came to a THEME PARK and rode THRILL RIDES knowing he had a heart condition and still blame it on the park. Um no. Those warnings are on every ride in every park across the WORLD for a reason. It’s a WORLD WIDE WARNING due to the fact that there is hundreds of languages spoke in these theme parks. Just so happen this man had a tragic event at Universal Orlando.
 

WondersOfLife

Blink, blink. Breathe, breathe. Day in, day out.
We have the technology. They could install touch screen signs to select literally almost any language to cover serious warnings for attractions... And I'm honestly sure this'll happen one day.
 

Raineman

Well-Known Member
In 2019, it would be an accurate assumption that most people have smartphones, and carry them with them most of the time. Google Translate is a free, widely available app that will translate any text that is in the phone’s camera sight to many different languages. Making park guests aware of this app should be an easier solution than re-signing everything into 58 different languages.
 

JIMINYCR

Well-Known Member
Warning signs in multiple languages or not.... what is his responsibility for being careful for himself, knowing he had had weak heart. I've never had a heart attack or heart related issue fortunately... but if I had and I was about to travel to an amusement park, I think I'd wonder what was safe for me to do. After having a heart incident Dr's usually advise/set boundaries. If he chose to ignore them, is it Unis fault? I'd be very careful about pushing the boundaries, experiencing something that even might present me with a rough enough ride to set off another one. I havent ridden Uni rides for some time but many attractions you can tell by the sounds while in line that they will be rough. Was that the case and could he have suspected it was an attraction out of his capabilities? How many warning signs are warranted? Had he gone into a buffet and gorged himself with food and experienced a HA would Uni be responsible for not saying in multiple languages...Warning... If you overeat you may cause a heart attack.
 

ppete1975

Well-Known Member
Are street signs in different languages? How about if you illiterate? Do they have brail? So many ways to attack a company. But its our legal systems fault for letting it get to this point. Personally i think english with a symbol maybe brail beside it should be sufficient. Allows anyone who can see and some that cant an ability to know whats going on. I mean you cant have rides do all languages, best you can do is have the common choosable. Btw have you ever rode spaceship earth in spanish (i dont know spanish) it’s interesting
 

Pooh.sHoneyHuntTDL

Well-Known Member
Are street signs in different languages? How about if you illiterate? Do they have brail? So many ways to attack a company. But its our legal systems fault for letting it get to this point. Personally i think english with a symbol maybe brail beside it should be sufficient. Allows anyone who can see and some that cant an ability to know whats going on. I mean you cant have rides do all languages, best you can do is have the common choosable. Btw have you ever rode spaceship earth in spanish (i dont know spanish) it’s interesting
I've listened to it in every language. Helps me go to sleep and get a quick nap.
 

helenabear

Well-Known Member
Obrigado e bem feito.....amazing how many peeps think Spanish is the only language spoken in South America......
I do think most forget how large Brasil really is! Spanish is a very close second, but still it's not the only language. Nor is Portuguese. Most in the US at least I think just assume about languages.

We do 2 languages in our home, and I do know at least Disney has multiple language options in the maps. I would imagine Universal would as well that has important info. Truthfully though, if I had a major health issue, I'd be telling my doctor what I was going to be doing and seek their advice. Language differences or not, that is something I would want a doctor's advice on.
 

larryz

Haven't Lost An Eye Yet!
Premium Member
If you don't know you have a bad heart, bad back, bad neck, etc., the signs won't do any good, regardless of what language they're in...
ETA:
Based on my experience as a museum volunteer, I can say with some assurance that most people don't read signs anyway.
 

Jim S

Well-Known Member
This lawsuit won't go anywhere with regards to signage

1) They say the father didn't speak english - but was he traveling alone? No. Did someone else help arrange for his trip to the park? (most certainly). Those people would have responsibility in part for helping him navigate and decide what to do.
2) The park provides services to non-english speakers in their foreign language already - Like Disney, they provide language specific brochures and park maps at entrances and guest relations
3) The team members (like Disney Cast Members) are already trained in how to handle non english speakers and have a system to connecting them with workers who can assist them in native language

The signage issue is just one justification the family is noting for their wrongful death suit. I imagine Universal would settle this case quietly since the guy died and just bury it vs spending money to fight it... and no changes will come because of it. The lawyers always try to find a reason to file their suit...


Good grief with my health condition Small World is risky-why would I get on any intense ride?
 
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