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Not Disney...but will probably impact Disney

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Well, my local police station has a sign with 12 languages on it to advise people that interpretation services are available. It's about the size of a piece of paper and probably cost 12 cents to print off. I can't imagine it would take much more to say "don't get on this ride if you're pregnant, have seizures or have heart issues." The theme parks know the top languages spoken there...
 

Pooh.sHoneyHuntTDL

Well-Known Member
How many languages are needed? You could make an argument for Spanish, French, German, Traditional Chinese, Simplified Chinese, Japanese, Russian, Arabic, Swahili, Catalonian, Gaelic, and Samoan.

Family Sues Universal Because Warning Signs are only in English
This is why everything is in English and Spanish now. Because companies don't want to get sued. Although with Skull Island I think you are more likely to get a heart attack when those actors come out of the falls to scare people.
 

scorp16

Well-Known Member
Original Poster
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I guess we can all interpret if this is enough. Or if their needs to be at least 6 of these on each attraction. English, Spanish, Portuguese, French, Chinese, and Japanese........but then what if the person that only speaks/reads Finnish gets on the ride?

I'm not making light of the fact that someone lost his life because he didn't understand the sign (supposedly).......but If I don't speak the language - know I'm not in great health to begin with - and see a sign like this ------ I'm probably gonna ask a few questions.
 
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I guess we can all interpret if this is enough. Or if their needs to be at least 6 of these on each attraction. English, Spanish, Portuguese, French, Chinese, and Japanese........but then what if the person that only speaks/reads Finnish gets on the ride?

I'm not making light of the fact that someone lost his life because he didn't understand the sign (supposedly).......but If I don't speak the language - know I'm not in great health to begin with - and see a sign like this ------ I'm probably gonna ask a few questions.
Imagine this was in Japanese. You wouldn't be able to understand the word "warning," let alone anything else. The pictograms are mystifying if you look at them by themselves. And who are you going to ask if you speak a language different from the CM standing there?
 

scorp16

Well-Known Member
Original Poster
Imagine this was in Japanese. You wouldn't be able to understand the word "warning," let alone anything else. The pictograms are mystifying if you look at them by themselves. And who are you going to ask if you speak a language different from the CM standing there?

When you see a sign in RED......that is that prominent.......it's trying to tell you something. Think about that. It's like saying you plowed through an intersection and slammed into a family of four because you didn't understand what the red light meant.
 
When you see a sign in RED......that is that prominent.......it's trying to tell you something. Think about that. It's like saying you plowed through an intersection and slammed into a family of four because you didn't understand what the red light meant.
Well, clearly it wasn't enough, at least not at Universal.
 

scorp16

Well-Known Member
Original Poster
Well, clearly it wasn't enough, at least not at Universal.
If I were in a country and didn't speak the language and saw this. I'd probably pay attention a bit. There's a reason why all these signs are in Red.

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But I think that's the point here. How much of a responsibility does a Universal, a Disney, a SeaWorld, Busch Gardens, Six Flags, a local hotel or establishment have - to protect you from yourself? And in how many languages are they required to protect you in?
 

scorp16

Well-Known Member
Original Poster
You keep pressing this many-languages argument. But go on, it'll stick by the twelfth of never.
Not pressing it. The lawyer in the article advocates for English, Spanish, and French. I'm just saying - I've seen a lot more Brazilian, Chinese and Japanese visitors than I've seen French. At that point - you kinda have a "many languages" scenario.

BTW - I think the signage was appropriate. I don't want a "many languages" type of environment.
 

Goofyernmost

Well-Known Member
And here I thought that when they started using universal warnings with net little pictures in a circle with a line through it, was supposed to be the answer to language differences. It is getting ridiculous. Does anyone have any idea just how many different languages and different dialect and individual area languages derived from those different languages. It really isn't hard to see the warning signs with or without words. Three years ago I went to France, Italy and Spain. I speak none of those languages except how to say thank you and guess what. I had no problems. Must we hold everyone's hand and succumb to impossible demands.
 
BTW - I think the signage was appropriate. I don't want a "many languages" type of environment.

I just have to ask....why? I mean this sincerely and without animosity. Disney is an international destination. Why would it bother you to have a warning sign in multiple languages?

(As I mentioned, you can fit a couple of sentences in a dozen languages on a single sheet of paper....cheap, unobtrusive, informative.)
 

Goofyernmost

Well-Known Member
I just have to ask....why? I mean this sincerely and without animosity. Disney is an international destination. Why would it bother you to have a warning sign in multiple languages?

(As I mentioned, you can fit a couple of sentences in a dozen languages on a single sheet of paper....cheap, unobtrusive, informative.)
For me it would depend on the reason for the sign. If universal warning symbols do not cover the problems, then adding multiple language signs would end up, after a while, covering the attraction, there is nothing theme about a warning sign. If we are talking about 8 1/2 X 11 paper or posters, I guarantee you that it would be as good as not having any. What information do people need. I went to France and rode a number of rides that were completely in French, I still enjoyed the ride, however, those universal warning signs were there and I didn't have to have it literally "spelled out" to understand. I would think that would apply to everyone. They do have information maps and info in many languages, surely they aren't expect to provide for every language on the planet!
 
With the availability of technology right now, there are apps out there where you could take a picture of the sign and it would translate to another language (especially the most common languages) with at least good enough accuracy to get the idea that there may be an issue with him riding with his heart problem. If you don't have access to something like a smartphone, someone in that family probably knows enough English to ask someone around them for help. The article only mentions that he didn't speak English, with no mention of how much English the rest of the family speaks. If the rest of the family knew enough English to understand the sign and he was the only one who didn't, then it's on them to pay enough attention to realize that the warning affects him.

I personally have not gone to Universal, and also don't really pay attention while at Disney since I have no problem, I don't know for sure, but more than likely, there is some sort of translation source available to them, whether that be someone who works for the park, or they give them something like an iPhone to be able to translate these signs. This shouldn't be an issue if resources were properly used.
 

scorp16

Well-Known Member
Original Poster
First of all, lawyers are ridiculous. I work in law, do I get a pass on this? Some of my best friends are lawyers!

Second of all, I think you're using and expanding his argument so that, God forbid, the most prominent language in the US can't be joined in warning spiels by the second most prominent language in the US. You're moving the goal posts, as it were (how I loathe saying that or reading it).
I don't necessarily have problem with Spanish being joined. But that's not the point. We're talking about international visitors to the most visited theme park in the US. While Spanish is the second most popular language spoken in the US (and it probably is second at WDW as well) there are many, many other prominent languages spoken by those that visit the theme parks in Orlando.

I think the lawsuit is ridiculous. And this is how things take on a life of their own. Being in law as you are - if a precedent is set requiring all warning signs be posted in English and Spanish - how long till another case comes about questioning why Portuguese isn't also required.

No moving goal posts here. I just read through the pleading. They are claiming Universal was negligent for not posting warnings in Spanish. And further that: "UNIVERSAL was aware of the great number of tourists on their premises who did not speak nor read English." (they didn't signal out Spanish specifically there)

You can just substitute the language at that point. - "Hey Disney has a brochure in German and they market in Germany, and furthermore they have guests that visit the parks from Germany. Thus, they should be required to have German signage." - "And that's why my client and his family suffered irreparable damage and loss - because he didn't realize the roller coaster shouldn't be ridden with a heart condition"

The point here is not that it wouldn't make business sense to do it, not that it wouldn't make the guest experience better for those guests. Its about having a law in place that states that it must.
 

flynnibus

Well-Known Member
Imagine this was in Japanese. You wouldn't be able to understand the word "warning," let alone anything else. The pictograms are mystifying if you look at them by themselves. And who are you going to ask if you speak a language different from the CM standing there?
Cast Members are trained on how to deal with foreign language speakers - cast members wear the language pins for a reason too.

And as its been pointed out - Disney has language specific literature available at the park entrance and guest relations.
 
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