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New to DAS..

Tink86

Member
Original Poster
Hello, I recently was diagnosed with ALS. We have a trip scheduled for June. Barring a miracle or inclusion in a research study this may be my last visit. I hope to still be ambulatory but lines maybe a problem. I've never used or asked for a DAS. Can you all tell me how it works? Thank you!
 

DisFanMark

Active Member
You can't beat the info you get direct from Disney, link below and in following comment. :) My only added advice as a long-time user for our son is to not over-expect what the service provides and enjoy your time.

 

Goofyernmost

Well-Known Member
Just my opinion here, but I went to WDW and Universal in Sept. of 2019. I had some serious vertebra issues that first of all stopped me from walking any distance without having to stop to rest my back and standing for a long time was an adventure in pain. I broke down and rented a scooter from an offsite company and then my family, myself and the public was not held up by someone that had to stop often or bide my time. The scooters are Queue friendly and do not require mobility until you actually reach the ride itself. No DAS necessary or doubling back constantly. If the line was reasonable we just go in it. No hassles and no problems. I would leave in the evening pain free and not exhausted. If you have mobility at this point but not enough to do the normal lines that is a really affordable answer and you take it anywhere, if you park hop or just find it easier to get to your transportation, be it private car or Disney transport.
 

EvanAnderson

Active Member
You go to Guest Relations or the Guest Experience Team. They will listen to you and determine if DAS is right for you. If they think yes, they will scan the magic band (or card) of the person who will need the service. That person will then have their picture taken. Then you are told how it works.

1. Go up to attraction you would like to experience.
2. Attraction Cast Member out front will have an iPhone looking device who will scan any member of your party.
3. It will give you a return time equal to the standby wait (if the wait is 60 minutes, your return time is 60 minutes).
4. Go and do something else.
5. When your time rolls around, go to the FP entrance and the person who needs the service will scan first, then everyone else will follow.
6. You can only have 1 return time at a time.
 

JIMINYCR

Well-Known Member
Sorry for the devastating diagnosis.... my prayers are being sent to you and your family.... and hope your trip will be all you are looking forward to and desire. And that it wont be your last. My DW has used the DAS on all our trips, having MS, on a vent and wheelchair bound. It isnt the best process or all it could be because its been abused by many in the past, but it does help you get through the frustrations of waiting in lines. Also know that the CM's are great in assisting you, not only at the attractions but everywhere on Disney property. They are the best. If you need assistance outside of what the DAS gives you, speak up to a CM. Theyve been godsends to us on more than one occasion and helped us through many frustrating circumstances.
 

Tink86

Member
Original Poster
Thank you all! It's hard to predict the progression of the disease so I am not sure what challenges I will have. While I hope none, the planning part of my personality needs to plan for all, and it is very difficult not knowing or even imagining the changes ahead of me. I am the third generation to go down this path so I know what it looks like, just hard to accept.
 

JusticeDisney

Premium Member
Hello, I recently was diagnosed with ALS. We have a trip scheduled for June. Barring a miracle or inclusion in a research study this may be my last visit. I hope to still be ambulatory but lines maybe a problem. I've never used or asked for a DAS. Can you all tell me how it works? Thank you!
I don’t have an answer to your specific question, but I just wanted to offer you my well wishes and hopes that you have the best trip of your life. God bless you.
 

Smiley/OCD

Well-Known Member
Thank you all! It's hard to predict the progression of the disease so I am not sure what challenges I will have. While I hope none, the planning part of my personality needs to plan for all, and it is very difficult not knowing or even imagining the changes ahead of me. I am the third generation to go down this path so I know what it looks like, just hard to accept.
To you, @Tink86, if that scene ever did arise, I would immediately ask for a supervisor, and while not making a scene (although you would have EVERY right to), make it a point to explain your situation. If that didn't work, then I'd get REAL LOUN in my own NJ way!
I hope and pray that scientists and researchers find cures for all medical problem...yours, mine and everyone's!! Have a Magical trip and take in ALL the sights...take your time and savor EVERYTHING!!
 

Goofyernmost

Well-Known Member
I basically said that you don't necessarily need a DAS. I see no difference between going to the attraction and be given a time to return that was the same as the current wait time then just getting in line. It all happens in the same time span. On top of the the current wait times will most likely be exaggerated as a psychological positivity booster. If you go to another ride to fill in the time that you received from the DAS, it isn't all the simple. Without it you can choose to come back later if you feel the wait is to long, but the real need is if there is a physical reason why you cannot stand in line if you don't have a mobility vehicle. It's up to you, but I personally saw no benefit as long as I had my scooter. I got in the regular line and just it in the queue like I had no issue. The DAS is much more for those that have an mental challenge of waiting or being in a crowd. Then it is worth while, in my opinion, otherwise I'd rather feel like I am doing what everyone else does like I did for so many years previous. Now if you are not planning to get a vehicle, then by all means get the DAS. However, you are going to be spending a lot of time either sitting on a bench or standing for a very long time. My advice... rent a scooter. The degree of enjoyment quadruples if not more.
 

StarWarsGirl

Well-Known Member
I actually look forward to the first guest that makes an under the breath, snide comment about my needing a DAS card..
I would never do that personally. My brother uses the DAS because he has autism, and I see all kinds of people with it, and sometimes I wonder why they need it, but it would never occur to me to ask why they need it. Heck, he looks "normal" until you hear him talk or see one of us interact with him.
 

StarWarsGirl

Well-Known Member
I basically said that you don't necessarily need a DAS. I see no difference between going to the attraction and be given a time to return that was the same as the current wait time then just getting in line. It all happens in the same time span. On top of the the current wait times will most likely be exaggerated as a psychological positivity booster. If you go to another ride to fill in the time that you received from the DAS, it isn't all the simple. Without it you can choose to come back later if you feel the wait is to long, but the real need is if there is a physical reason why you cannot stand in line if you don't have a mobility vehicle. It's up to you, but I personally saw no benefit as long as I had my scooter. I got in the regular line and just it in the queue like I had no issue. The DAS is much more for those that have an mental challenge of waiting or being in a crowd. Then it is worth while, in my opinion, otherwise I'd rather feel like I am doing what everyone else does like I did for so many years previous. Now if you are not planning to get a vehicle, then by all means get the DAS. However, you are going to be spending a lot of time either sitting on a bench or standing for a very long time. My advice... rent a scooter. The degree of enjoyment quadruples if not more.
It might be different if it's just mobility issues, but for something like ALS or MS where you have mobility issues and something wrong in your brain, waiting in a line that long can be problematic. My late grandfather had MS; he never wanted to go to WDW because the idea of waiting in lines was too much for him; that was before the GAC and DAS programs. If you're asking for a DAS because you have a broken ankle and can't walk then yes, you probably should be using a scooter. If you're asking for one because of a neurological condition that also causes mobility issues, that's a whole nother beast.
 

pixie225

Active Member
I would never do that personally. My brother uses the DAS because he has autism, and I see all kinds of people with it, and sometimes I wonder why they need it, but it would never occur to me to ask why they need it. Heck, he looks "normal" until you hear him talk or see one of us interact with him.
We also get a DAS for my daughter, who has a seizure disorder (brain tumor x 2) and speech language/developmental disabilities. She also looks "normal" until she speaks or has a seizure (not grand mal). We HAVE had people comment to our faces on why we are "cutting the line" at airports, amusement parks, etc. I just look at them and nicely say "spend one day in our shoes and you will see why. I hope you never have to experience that." That shuts them up pretty quickly. Btw - she is now 32, lives with us, travels the world with us, and immediately wins over anyone she meets with her great personality.
 

Goofyernmost

Well-Known Member
It might be different if it's just mobility issues, but for something like ALS or MS where you have mobility issues and something wrong in your brain, waiting in a line that long can be problematic. My late grandfather had MS; he never wanted to go to WDW because the idea of waiting in lines was too much for him; that was before the GAC and DAS programs. If you're asking for a DAS because you have a broken ankle and can't walk then yes, you probably should be using a scooter. If you're asking for one because of a neurological condition that also causes mobility issues, that's a whole nother beast.
I'm not sure that the two are connected. Yes, of course, if there is a neurological condition, it goes without saying that a DAS should be obtained. However, in this case, unless I missed it, there was no mention of having any neurological problem connected directly to just physically being in a queue line and not just physical discomfort. It appeared to me to just be the physical restriction caused by the illness that makes it either painful or very uncomfortable to stand for extended periods of time. That problem is solved by the scooter and I think is a better solution then the DAS which is a constant hassle of back and forth in the park to get back to the window of opportunity. As long as my problem was just physical having to deal with lengthy walking or extensive standing causing pain or fatigue, then to me the way to enjoy the experience and have some semblance of normalcy is the scooter. To me if one has been going there for years as a non-restricted individual, it is far closer to being the "old" experience with the aid of physical assistance.
 

Goofyernmost

Well-Known Member
ALS IS a neurological disease.
Yes, but there are many. The ones that were being referred to were neurological diseases that caused physical mobility problems not psychological situations dealing with crowds or impatience in waiting. Let's stay focused on the actual issue not that of other unrelated situations.
 

NelleBelle

Well-Known Member
Yes, but there are many. The ones that were being referred to were neurological diseases that caused physical mobility problems not psychological situations dealing with crowds or impatience in waiting. Let's stay focused on the actual issue not that of other unrelated situations.
How am I not focused on the "actual issue"? What is unrelated?
 

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