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My fear

TheGuyThatMakesSwords

Well-Known Member
Every year, I buy plane tickets to Orlando in order to avoid a 16 hour drive. Every year, as my trip date draws closer, I talk myself out of flying, and into driving. It's not the fear of flying. It's the fear of getting sick (cold/flu), having been on a plane, sitting by strangers, during flu season (October) who may or may not be sick. If I don't use the tickets I purchased this year, I'll have thrown away $1100 in airfare over the last two years, so I ask to those of you that fly to Orlando, how often are you getting sick after flying???

DW and I are not exactly sure where our Colds come from, on our WDW trips. We DO get them - but we've taken to using precautions when flying....

1) Chewable ZINC tablets, about a day before we fly. This won't prevent a Cold - but it will interfere with the propagation of a Cold Virus.
2) ALWAYS up on our Flu Shots.
3) The big one: We will be the couple wearing SURGICAL MASKS, on all flights. We eat, or drink, NOTHING. Always use hand sanitizer as well.

A lot of this (minus the SURGICAL MASKS) is applicable to our STAY at WDW. One handrail, complete with snot, will do it :).
We've knocked down bad illness a lot, despite our age :).
 

mergatroid

Well-Known Member
Places I would suspect are more "germy" than an airplane.

Anything you touch from the security entrance to the touchpad at any park entrance.

Lap bars, seat belts, or any railing or hand hold to get in or out of a ride vehicle.

Every bathroom in every park.

All of fantasyland.

When it comes to ordering at a McDonald’s, using a traditional counter over a touchscreen kiosk may be better for your health.

A study by U.K. newspaper Metro found gut and fecal bacteria on touchscreens in all of the chain’s restaurants it surveyed. It took samples from the screens in eight branches and found that they contained coliform bacteria, a group of microorganisms found in people’s intestines as well as in soil and on plants.


Senior lecturer in microbiology at London Metropolitan University Dr Paul Matewele told the newspaper: “We were all surprised how much gut and fecal bacteria there was on the touchscreen machines. These cause the kind of infections that people pick up in hospitals.”

Metro’s research with the university took swabs from six London McDonald’s outlets and two in Birmingham. Listeria, a bacteria that can cause listeriosis and is a concern especially for those over 65 and pregnant women, was found on screens in two branches.

🤢
 

jloucks

Well-Known Member
Not sure if its lying. It's more interpreting and spinning. "Safer" is the word causing the confusion.

So yes, more people die in automobile accidents each year vs people that die in a plane crash by sheer number.

But your chance of surviving a plane crash is far less than surviving a car crash. You get into a fender bender, and a lot of the time, you just walk away, go get coffee and calm your nerves. Now, if your plane plunges from 35,000 feet - I got a feeling you're not going to be able to just walk away and get a cup of coffee.

So, the chances of getting into a car accident are greater than the chances of getting into plane crash. But the chances of surviving a car crash are also much greater than surviving a plane crash.

The common denominator used in most of the "planes are safer" studies is miles traveled. Not much spin there really. Also, a very fair comparison between the two methods of travel. People travel X miles in a car per year -vs- people travel X miles in a plane per year. Planes are the unspun winner in the safety per mile contests. I contend there is no better measure than per mile of travel.

Also, a lot of crazy stuff can happen to a plane and you don't die. Engines can fall off. Birds can splat a hole thru the windshield. flap can dangle. Gear can get stuck. They can land in rivers with 100% survival rate. Turbulence so bad you bounce of ceiling. I could keep going, but you get the point. Shoot, I've been in a commercial plane that made an emergency landing (fuel pump died) with firetrucks and whatnot. They can get pretty darn banged up and survive.
 

MickeyLuv'r

Well-Known Member
Thanks for all the great replies & suggestions. To me, getting sick, shortly after getting off a plane, seemed a forgone conclusion. Reading your responses helped me realize that, after all this time, I may have been wrong.

You are taking a trip to WDW. WDW is far from germ-free If you have successfully gone to WDW without getting sick, then flying is little different.

The airline industry would not exists if every flier routinely got sick. How do you think the flight crew does their job? If everyone got sick, we'd avoid flying.

While I don't think vitamin C in itself is harmful, taking it before flying is also likely a complete waste. Same thing with Airborne.

On the other hand, eating healthy foods, including fresh fruits, vegetables, and pro-biotic foods (yogurt, naturally pickled foods, hard cheese) are good ideas.

It is also always a good idea to help your immune system by drinking plenty of liquids. Flying can be a bit dehydrating, and being too dehydrated doesn't help your immune system. Always drink plenty of water.

It might help if you actually visited an airport - without booking a flight - to acclimate yourself to the idea of flying. Ideally, a large airport. It might help to see how many non-sick people are there. I was just at two big airports in the past few days, plus a small airport. the small airport had few people.
 

SteamboatJoe

Well-Known Member
Once in 2015. I've flown back to Orlando since and to Los Angeles (with a layover in Vegas) and had no problems. Don't throw your money away. Take a multivitamin and constantly wash your hands.
 

rose2617

New Member
The dreaded airplane virus. It is an actual problem and many many do get sick after flying, per studies done. The ventilation system is a viral petri dish and according to the latest read the tray tables have more germs on them then your toilet. I am no longer embarrassed to wipe down the arm rests, tray table and seat belts upon boarding. I use Thieves Essential Oil, that is anti-viral. I also put a drop of it under my nose and have found that this works and I no longer get a cold a few days into my vacation or return home with one. I would try the suggestions posted here and give yourself a break from that long drive.
 

Weather_Lady

Well-Known Member
I've never gotten sick after flying, nor has anyone else in my family.

I will add, though, that we practice some basic hygiene precautions when flying: I pack sanitizing wet wipes in my "personal item" bag, and when each of us sits down in our seat on the plane, we do a quick wipe-down of the top of the tray table, the arm rests, and the touchscreen/controls of any onboard entertainment system. If eating in-flight, we wash our hands first, just as we would anywhere else.

I almost always pack some zinc meltaways in my luggage (in case I feel something coming on), but so far I've never had to use them. Knock on wood, we've stayed healthy throughout our travels!
 

HappyTexan

New Member
Every year, I buy plane tickets to Orlando in order to avoid a 16 hour drive. Every year, as my trip date draws closer, I talk myself out of flying, and into driving. It's not the fear of flying. It's the fear of getting sick (cold/flu), having been on a plane, sitting by strangers, during flu season (October) who may or may not be sick. If I don't use the tickets I purchased this year, I'll have thrown away $1100 in airfare over the last two years, so I ask to those of you that fly to Orlando, how often are you getting sick after flying???
I fly to MCO normally 2 - 3 times a year. I, personally, haven't gotten sick yet (knock on wood) We've driven to WDW twice and it is around a 16 hour drive and YUCK!! We've decided to not ever drive again until we move closer. You might think about buying one of those masks and keep your nose and mouth covered.. that might work.
 

Khcuttin

Member
I understand your fear, and it is justified, but you can get a flu shot, and also purchase insurance so IF you do get sick, you will be reimbursed. I would have to drive 22 hours, or fly for 3 hours and 16 minutes. Its a no brainier for me, but you are more likely to catch the flu pumping gas on the way to Disney, and just all the stops you would inevitably make for food, bathroom breaks, and gas. I fly multiple times a year, and knock on wood... I have never got sick! Good luck with your travels no matter what mode of transportation you use!!
 

Khcuttin

Member
My immune system is compromised from Chemotherapy, but I take basic precautions. Sanitize my tray on the airplane with a "wipe", get my flu shot, I don't put my hands near my face, and after touching something like a magazine, I sanitize or wash my hands. Proper precautions should alleviate most illnesses, but germs are small, stubborn little suckers, lol. You can get sick anywhere. Its not the plane, wasting over 1 thousand dollars over a fear is MORE of an issue than any germ. Your going to Disney, Hakuna Matata!!!!!!
 

ddbowdoin

Well-Known Member
It has to be mental... like a predisposition of being mentally prepared to be sick, ie you become sick.

I'm more in the camp of exposure is good... I never use purell or carry any of that stuff and alas, I never get sick. I don't obsessively wash my hands if I meet and shake hands with new people or open door handles, etc... alas, I never get sick.

I've even flown multiple times to China *15.5 hours direct to Beijing* on a chinese airline where essentially there are 2% American attendance and I've never gotten sick.

Your personal health is dictated by your nutrition... eat clean, live clean and you avoid the head colds etc.
 

Disney.Mike

Well-Known Member
Every year, I buy plane tickets to Orlando in order to avoid a 16 hour drive. Every year, as my trip date draws closer, I talk myself out of flying, and into driving. It's not the fear of flying. It's the fear of getting sick (cold/flu), having been on a plane, sitting by strangers, during flu season (October) who may or may not be sick. If I don't use the tickets I purchased this year, I'll have thrown away $1100 in airfare over the last two years, so I ask to those of you that fly to Orlando, how often are you getting sick after flying???

I was on over 150 flights last year and got sick 1 time, took about 3 days to fully get over. I flew all year all around the country. If you're generally healthy, I wouldn't worry about it.
 

Disney.Mike

Well-Known Member
The drive is just the beginning. As soon as I get to the hotel, everything, and I mean everything is thoroughly disinfected. I also won’t let housekeeping clean the room for the first few days, in case they are sick.

I also touch nothing with my hands. I find other ways to push down on a lap bar or open doors.

If someone in front of me coughs or sneezes, I either let A LOT of people go ahead of more, or leave & come back later. It’s not worth it.

It the last few days of my trip, I don’t really care as much. If I got sick then, it wouldn’t have time to develop before I got home & I really don’t care if I’m sick at home.

Maybe you should save the Disney money and go see a therapist.
 

trainplane3

Well-Known Member
In all my years of flying, I've gotten sick during vacation once (2 days after arrival). And even then it was probably because of refilling a water bottle at a water fountain so I wouldn't even pin it on flying. And even then I was only out of commission for a single day. The only thing I do is wipe down the arm rests, seat belt, and tray tables.

I've sat in front of and behind completely sick kids, coughing, sneezing, screaming, and vomiting everywhere. EVERYWHERE. EVERYWHERE. I was fine. Now I'm essentially immune to the smell of vomit. Go me... I guess.

Either fly for a change, go Amtrak, or just accept the fact you won't fly and stop burning money on plane tickets. Not trying to sound cruel...
 
So I know I'm a little late to the party and honestly not sure I want to read through all 5 pages to see if anyone else mentions this.

The air in your airplane, while it is much dryer so you need to drink more water, is actually cleaner than the air in your home or office building. We all know that germs can spread through coughs and sneezes, that's why the HVAC system for an office completely replaces all the air in the building every 2-3 minutes so you are always breathing clean air. Airplanes do the same thing with their air, but it's every 90 seconds and done a bit differently because you're at 37,000 feet.

With that being said, as long as the person on the plane that's sick is not very close to you, the chances of you getting sick from breathing something in is coming from dehydration from the super dry air and not the sick person 3 aisles ahead of you
 

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