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My fear

KBLovesDisney

Well-Known Member
The drive is just the beginning. As soon as I get to the hotel, everything, and I mean everything is thoroughly disinfected. I also won’t let housekeeping clean the room for the first few days, in case they are sick.

I also touch nothing with my hands. I find other ways to push down on a lap bar or open doors.

If someone in front of me coughs or sneezes, I either let A LOT of people go ahead of more, or leave & come back later. It’s not worth it.

It the last few days of my trip, I don’t really care as much. If I got sick then, it wouldn’t have time to develop before I got home & I really don’t care if I’m sick at home.
Sounds like you have a terrible fear of germs :( I think it best you seek someone to discuss that with. They may be able to help you.
 

SirWillow

Well-Known Member
Never been sick after flying. Ever.

And my immune system stinks due to several issues. if there's a way to get sick, I often find it. And I've not had an issue at all. This includes flying to WDW last October, to Israel last June (12 hours each way) and to France and several places in the US in Feb of 2018 (15 hours each way to Paris).

Lots of other good advice on the thread. But you're more likely to get sick from exhausting yourself with the drive than you are from the time on the plane.
 

SirWillow

Well-Known Member
I’m going to second @DisneyMedStudent and sincerely suggest you seek professional assistance. What you are describing is beyond just being cautious. It sounds like your life is being impacted and there is no need for you to continue to suffer.

I'm also going to agree with this. It sounds like normal concern being taken to the level of paranoia where it's having a drastic impact on you being able to live a normal life and how you approach and deal with things. If you're not already, I'd encourage you to seek out a professional for some help.

There's nothing wrong with needing a bit of counseling and help. Honestly, everyone probably needs it at some point, but it's sad that we've put such a negative stigma on it.
 

jloucks

Well-Known Member
Yea, I get sick from travel too. But, not because of the plane. Probably. Just the exotic germs in the new local. Europe gets to me after about 5 days. Also how I know first hand socialized medicine doesn't suck, but that's a whole other topic.

So my advice is about the same as everyone elses.
  • Get plenty of rest. Get run down, get sick.
  • Stop sucking on your fingers
  • Don't lick strangers. Or their fingers.
  • Don't touch stuff you don't have to touch.
  • Before you start sucking fingers (or eating food), wash hands well.
I would not worry about the airplane at all (following above advice). That is the least of your worries on a trip. You are also stressing yourself out and that that is not helping at all.
 

thomas998

Well-Known Member
More likely to get killed driving.... Have a drink and jump on that plane...
Ah... the old safer to fly than drive statistic... Just remember that statistics are just fancy ways to lie. According to an article that was going over all sorts of statistics and how they manipulate perceptions, by using those same statistics that say it is safer to fly than to drive, it is also safer to walk a tight rope than it is to fly. And I know for certain that I would much rather fly somewhere than walk a tightrope.
 

DisneyFreak

Well-Known Member
I don't usually get sick from the flight, I usually get sick from being at WDW from people not washing hands and coughing and sneezing on everything and not covering their mouth or nose.

I will usually take Airbourne a week before leaving up through a week after coming back and that does the trick for me most of the time. Just make sure to wash your hands and/or use hand sanitizer and keep your hands away from your face. Also breath through your nose, not your mouth.
 

bubbles1812

Well-Known Member
The drive is just the beginning. As soon as I get to the hotel, everything, and I mean everything is thoroughly disinfected. I also won’t let housekeeping clean the room for the first few days, in case they are sick.

I also touch nothing with my hands. I find other ways to push down on a lap bar or open doors.

If someone in front of me coughs or sneezes, I either let A LOT of people go ahead of more, or leave & come back later. It’s not worth it.

It the last few days of my trip, I don’t really care as much. If I got sick then, it wouldn’t have time to develop before I got home & I really don’t care if I’m sick at home.
This is the definition of compulsive behavior. It may feel like the ‘norm’ for you but this isn’t normal human behavior.

Someone sneezing (which can happen for a variety of reasons) shouldn’t lead you to send 100 people ahead of you. Canceling flights over a slight chance of getting sick isn’t rational. Not letting housekeeping in... I mean they are wearing gloves and ironically cleaning your place... makes little sense.

As a physician, if someone came to me describing this, describing the hoops you are having to jump through, and the impact it’s having on your life, I’d be talking to them about a formal evaluation for OCD and the recommendation for therapy and potentially medication.

It might not be enough to save your flights this trip, but I would seriously think about what impact these compulsions are having on you and seek help.
 

thomas998

Well-Known Member
This is the definition of compulsive behavior. It may feel like the ‘norm’ for you but this isn’t normal human behavior.

Someone sneezing (which can happen for a variety of reasons) shouldn’t lead you to send 100 people ahead of you. Canceling flights over a slight chance of getting sick isn’t rational. Not letting housekeeping in... I mean they are wearing gloves and ironically cleaning your place... makes little sense.

As a physician, if someone came to me describing this, describing the hoops you are having to jump through, and the impact it’s having on your life, I’d be talking to them about a formal evaluation for OCD and the recommendation for therapy and potentially medication.

It might not be enough to save your flights this trip, but I would seriously think about what impact these compulsions are having on you and seek help.
I have to wonder how the person behaves when they are at home... Do they leave grocery stores if someone coughs or sneezes or is the whole germaphobe thing only when on a vacation. Somehow I can't see anyone only being like this on vacation, I would have to guess that it is a bit like this in their everyday life.
 

LittleBuford

Well-Known Member
This is the definition of compulsive behavior. It may feel like the ‘norm’ for you but this isn’t normal human behavior.

Someone sneezing (which can happen for a variety of reasons) shouldn’t lead you to send 100 people ahead of you. Canceling flights over a slight chance of getting sick isn’t rational. Not letting housekeeping in... I mean they are wearing gloves and ironically cleaning your place... makes little sense.

As a physician, if someone came to me describing this, describing the hoops you are having to jump through, and the impact it’s having on your life, I’d be talking to them about a formal evaluation for OCD and the recommendation for therapy and potentially medication.

It might not be enough to save your flights this trip, but I would seriously think about what impact these compulsions are having on you and seek help.

As someone who’s struggled with OCD since early childhood, I can confirm that treatment really does help. The fact that the OP reached out to the forum community is already a promising sign.

You can do it, @Spookie2018! Take it from someone who knows from personal experience what it’s like to have such concerns.
 

mergatroid

Well-Known Member
Never and we travel from the UK every year. As others have nicely said, maybe try to get some help with this 'phobia' you have rather than avoiding what causes the worry (getting sick flying). Otherwise it could spill into so many other facets in life that you also have no control over. For instance when you eat out at restaurants, how do you know the chef is clean or hasn't spat in your food? When you buy your food from the shops how do you know who's done what to it in the factory that packs it (a friend of mine in the UK used to work at a Walker's Crisps factory where a colleague would sometimes urinate in food during the production process). If you take your car for a service do you know the medical history of those working on it or what contagious diseases they may have?

Taking common sense precautions to stay well are always a good thing, when they start affecting your life negatively though they can become a bigger problem than the potential of the very thing you're trying to avoid. You're not 'crazy' or anything and I think everyone can see the logic behind your behaviour, however getting some help with these worries should improve your life far more than avoiding germs on a plane ever will.

All the best.
 

beertiki

Well-Known Member
Places I would suspect are more "germy" than an airplane.

Anything you touch from the security entrance to the touchpad at any park entrance.

Lap bars, seat belts, or any railing or hand hold to get in or out of a ride vehicle.

Every bathroom in every park.

All of fantasyland.
 

"El Scorpion"

Duke of Sealand
Premium Member
In the Parks
No
Ah... the old safer to fly than drive statistic... Just remember that statistics are just fancy ways to lie.

Not sure if its lying. It's more interpreting and spinning. "Safer" is the word causing the confusion.

So yes, more people die in automobile accidents each year vs people that die in a plane crash by sheer number.

But your chance of surviving a plane crash is far less than surviving a car crash. You get into a fender bender, and a lot of the time, you just walk away, go get coffee and calm your nerves. Now, if your plane plunges from 35,000 feet - I got a feeling you're not going to be able to just walk away and get a cup of coffee.

So, the chances of getting into a car accident are greater than the chances of getting into plane crash. But the chances of surviving a car crash are also much greater than surviving a plane crash.
 

thomas998

Well-Known Member
Not sure if its lying. It's more interpreting and spinning. "Safer" is the word causing the confusion.

So yes, more people die in automobile accidents each year vs people that die in a plane crash by sheer number.

But your chance of surviving a plane crash is far less than surviving a car crash. You get into a fender bender, and a lot of the time, you just walk away, go get coffee and calm your nerves. Now, if your plane plunges from 35,000 feet - I got a feeling you're not going to be able to just walk away and get a cup of coffee.

So, the chances of getting into a car accident are greater than the chances of getting into plane crash. But the chances of surviving a car crash are also much greater than surviving a plane crash.
Oh I'm well aware of the odds of surviving a real plane crash... I have never liked flying for that very reason and that fact that when I die I would like to die in one piece and not be burned beyond recognition or smashed into pieces so small that they'll only know I was dead from DNA tests done to bone fragments. But I also look at the probability of the plane going crashing and it is a very unlikely thing to happen. Look at it this way, when you drive a car you are out there among thousands of other driver many of whom don't care about themselves much less anyone else. And realize that most fatal accidents involve more than one car so your death in a car is likely going to be the result of one of those other drivers, probably being drunk and slamming into your car head on at highway speeds. Compare that to being a passenger on plane. That plane costs millions of dollars and is owned by a company that relies on that plane to generate revenue for the company. The company is going to get a much better person to fly that plan than you are likely to be driving near on the road when it comes to their training. Then factor in the fact that planes don't normally crash because they fly into another plane it is usually pilot error or plane malfunction... So don't worry about the planes, they are less likely to crash than you are to crash in your car in a fatal accident.
 

clarabellej

Well-Known Member
Every year, I buy plane tickets to Orlando in order to avoid a 16 hour drive. Every year, as my trip date draws closer, I talk myself out of flying, and into driving. It's not the fear of flying. It's the fear of getting sick (cold/flu), having been on a plane, sitting by strangers, during flu season (October) who may or may not be sick. If I don't use the tickets I purchased this year, I'll have thrown away $1100 in airfare over the last two years, so I ask to those of you that fly to Orlando, how often are you getting sick after flying???
The one year I was concerned was a few years back when the flu was worse than usual and seemed to be lasting into early spring. We were fine though. Actually we’ve never gotten sick flying to and from, or at Disney. We do have a sort of short flight though: from TX. I am not a huge fan of flying, but hey, it sure gets me to Disney quicker. More Disney time is always a good thing. We drove for years, due to our budget. Much better flying IMO.
 

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