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MFSR 40 minutes; Slinky Dog 50

HongKongFu

Active Member
Original Poster
it seemed like the opening of the Land was going to be a crazy insurmountable mess. Seems like that only lasted a few days...
Small correction........let's use "day" as in singular. I was there on day 2 and showed up around 3pm and the place was not packed, busy with a lot of movement and energy but most definitely not packed whatsoever. Falcon was 70 minutes and the light saber store had a 8 person deep queue to enter it. Travel Guides would allow those queuing in as other "travelers" exited the shop
 

Weather_Lady

Well-Known Member
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My two cents: Having waited in an only-25-minute-line for Millennium Falcon at DL a couple of weeks ago, I can testify that the attraction moves people through surprisingly quickly (the line was almost to the entrance, but it moved constantly, and the queue was so well-done and full of details that it was a pleasure to move through), which reflects both a respectable capacity, AND the lack of Fastpass. At Slinky, the wait is going to be longer because its capacity is tiny, and the vast majority of people riding it have FP, so those in standby can't avoid a long wait even when the standby line is short. It's not that Slinky is any better or more popular. In fact, having experienced MFSR without Fastpass bogging down the line, my personal wish is that it never starts distributing Fastpasses.

While I think Disney shot itself in the foot by opening Galaxy's Edge without its main attraction, and by cutting out a table-service restaurant and other elements that would have made it more of a draw to guests of all ages, I don't necessarily think the lack of crowds is reflective of a lack of interest or an indication that MFSR isn't a good attraction. I suspect that many guests are simply waiting to visit until the land is "complete," and don't like the idea of walking all the way out to a far-flung section of the park when the only thing you can do there (without spending additional money) is just one attraction.
 
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CAV

Active Member
My two cents: Having waited in an only-25-minute-line for Millennium Falcon at DL a couple of weeks ago, I can testify that the attraction moves people through surprisingly quickly (the line was almost to the entrance, but it moved constantly, and the queue was so well-done and full of details that it was a pleasure to move through), which reflects both a respectable capacity, AND the lack of Fastpass. At Slinky, the wait is going to be longer because its capacity is tiny, and the vast majority of people riding it have FP, so those in standby can't avoid a long wait even when the standby line is short. It's not that Slinky is any better or more popular. In fact, having experienced MFSR without Fastpass bogging down the line, my personal wish is that it never starts distributing Fastpasses.

While I think Disney shot itself in the foot by opening Galaxy's Edge without its main attraction, and by cutting out a table-service restaurant and other elements that would have made it more of a draw to guests of all ages, I don't necessarily think the lack of crowds is reflective of a lack of interest or an indication that MFSR isn't a good attraction. I suspect that many guests are simply waiting to visit until the land is "complete," and don't like the idea of walking all the way out to a far-flung section of the park when the only thing you can do there (without spending additional money) is just one attraction.
There a huge Star Wars fans. And there are huge Disney fans. But it doesn't appear there are huge Star Wars Disney fans.
 

FettFan

Well-Known Member
Falcons and Star Wars Lands on both coasts as a whole are not performing anywhere near the galactic expectations and I'm not sure why.
I have an idea.

It rhymes with “Buy Long Johns, Son”

Fact of the matter is, this land wasn’t built for old school Star Wars fans; it was made to advertise Disney’s version of Star Wars, and there’s been a growing rift between Disney/Lucasfilm and original fans ever since they canned the original Expanded Universe.

 

NickMaio

Well-Known Member
On any given day I might drop into a park and sit back and absorb the atmosphere. On Tues afternoon I spontaneously decided to go over to Studios to drink some coffee, walk around and chat with some CM's.

Something is not right.

Considering the project scope, hype, and budget I'm getting the impression Star Wars Land is not getting the type love Disney expected.

It happened in Anaheim and now it's happening in WDW.

How in the world is Slinky more coveted than Falcon? 40 minute wait for a new E-ish ride in a billion dollar land??? Even after factoring in FP or lackthereof it just confounds.
There is a serious disturbance in the force.
 

BoarderPhreak

Well-Known Member
I suspect once RotR opens, it'll be standing room only... For a good while. It's unfortunate the opening was delayed on both coasts.
 

Janir

Well-Known Member
Same experience on Monday for us. SR said wait time was 45 minutes-it was easily not more than 30 minutes.

SDD had a posted 50 minute wait and it was every bit of it.

But, the SR line never stopped moving.
SDD, on the other hand, was a constants stop and go.

Seems like SR had more throughput than SDD. Perhaps it was because there was not a FP line slowing the standby line down.

BTW, SR left me feeling, "Was that it?"
SDD doesn't have a great rider throughput, and that's been discussed on these forums before. And only 18 ppl per train (4 trains total) not a great attraction guest throughput.
And the fact of SR not having any FP system at all means 100% rider capacity is dedicated to standby as you noted.
 

Glasgow

Well-Known Member
My two cents: Having waited in an only-25-minute-line for Millennium Falcon at DL a couple of weeks ago, I can testify that the attraction moves people through surprisingly quickly (the line was almost to the entrance, but it moved constantly, and the queue was so well-done and full of details that it was a pleasure to move through), which reflects both a respectable capacity, AND the lack of Fastpass. At Slinky, the wait is going to be longer because its capacity is tiny, and the vast majority of people riding it have FP, so those in standby can't avoid a long wait even when the standby line is short. It's not that Slinky is any better or more popular. In fact, having experienced MFSR without Fastpass bogging down the line, my personal wish is that it never starts distributing Fastpasses.

While I think Disney shot itself in the foot by opening Galaxy's Edge without its main attraction, and by cutting out a table-service restaurant and other elements that would have made it more of a draw to guests of all ages, I don't necessarily think the lack of crowds is reflective of a lack of interest or an indication that MFSR isn't a good attraction. I suspect that many guests are simply waiting to visit until the land is "complete," and don't like the idea of walking all the way out to a far-flung section of the park when the only thing you can do there (without spending additional money) is just one attraction.
Whoa whoa whoa - don't cloud this conversation with facts. Its much easier to just be angry and speculate. Shame on you.
 

twilight mitsuk

Well-Known Member
I have an idea.

It rhymes with “Buy Long Johns, Son”

Fact of the matter is, this land wasn’t built for old school Star Wars fans; it was made to advertise Disney’s version of Star Wars, and there’s been a growing rift between Disney/Lucasfilm and original fans ever since they canned the original Expanded Universe.

Unlike wwohp
 

HongKongFu

Active Member
Original Poster
SDD doesn't have a great rider throughput, and that's been discussed on these forums before. And only 18 ppl per train (4 trains total) not a great attraction guest throughput.
And the fact of SR not having any FP system at all means 100% rider capacity is dedicated to standby as you noted.

I'm not buying it even though what you wrote above appears accurate.

Considering a billion dollar setup for the land and the one and only E- ish caliber ride in this billion dollar Batuu turnout has been extremely underwhelming.

Again, Space mnt, IJ, Splash Mnt **without FP** hosted multi hour waits well after opening, too.

( Perhaps Star Tours should be on that list also but I can't confirm it)
 

ppet

Well-Known Member
I am hoping that MFSR is the Navi, while RotR becomes the next FoP. I guess we'll know in a few months.
 

Jon81uk

Well-Known Member
Again, Space mnt, IJ, Splash Mnt **without FP** hosted multi hour waits well after opening, too.
Magic Kingdom as an entity does not conform to the same rules as any other theme park on the planet. MK and Disneyland are the most attended theme parks in the world, not matter what is on offer there, the crowds will come. Its very hard to compare what happens in the castle parks to the other parks.
 

Mickeyboof

Well-Known Member
My two cents: Having waited in an only-25-minute-line for Millennium Falcon at DL a couple of weeks ago, I can testify that the attraction moves people through surprisingly quickly (the line was almost to the entrance, but it moved constantly, and the queue was so well-done and full of details that it was a pleasure to move through), which reflects both a respectable capacity, AND the lack of Fastpass. At Slinky, the wait is going to be longer because its capacity is tiny, and the vast majority of people riding it have FP, so those in standby can't avoid a long wait even when the standby line is short. It's not that Slinky is any better or more popular. In fact, having experienced MFSR without Fastpass bogging down the line, my personal wish is that it never starts distributing Fastpasses.

While I think Disney shot itself in the foot by opening Galaxy's Edge without its main attraction, and by cutting out a table-service restaurant and other elements that would have made it more of a draw to guests of all ages, I don't necessarily think the lack of crowds is reflective of a lack of interest or an indication that MFSR isn't a good attraction. I suspect that many guests are simply waiting to visit until the land is "complete," and don't like the idea of walking all the way out to a far-flung section of the park when the only thing you can do there (without spending additional money) is just one attraction.
So full of details?

Yawn. I found the queue to be shockingly pathetic. Dumb actor voices yelling at each other, an engine that would sometimes make noise, and a bunch of switches that did NOTHING. How can a queue that should set us up for this interactive ride have dead features in the queue.

The queue for Alien Swirling Saucers is more entertaining and interactive.

A good queue would have set us up for a flight, not taken us through a maintenance shed that has been frozen in time.

Thank god the Flight of Passage queue isn’t completely static (and thank god there aren’t annoying voices coming from a radio the whole time).

I believe it’s the LACK of “details” that aren’t bringing anyone to this land PLUS disney’s own marketing confusions.
 

Weather_Lady

Well-Known Member
So full of details?

Yawn. I found the queue to be shockingly pathetic.
Sorry you found it boring and were annoyed by the audio components. Maybe I enjoyed it more because I'd read up on the Easter Eggs ahead of time, and for me personally, the audio was more immersive than intrusive. I also wasn't disappointed that it wasn't interactive, particularly since the line was constantly moving, so interactive elements would have created annoying bottlenecks when people stopped to play with things.
 

Wendy Pleakley

Well-Known Member
Fact of the matter is, this land wasn’t built for old school Star Wars fans; it was made to advertise Disney’s version of Star Wars, and there’s been a growing rift between Disney/Lucasfilm and original fans ever since they canned the original Expanded Universe.
Honestly, how many fans really care that that a bunch of novels are no longer canon? And really, with any major franchise like Star Wars or Star Trek that have a book division, the main films & shows are never beholden to what happens elsewhere. The books are canon until they're not.
 
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