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Rumor Is the End of Innoventions Near?

GlacierGlacier

Well-Known Member
So plans are for West to get razed, but keep East standing? That will look very strange...
Asymmetric park design is so very in right now, darling.

Almost missed this posting. This will be awesome. Construction walls are better than E tickets in my opinion.
They represent so much more than an actual attraction. It's the possibilities of "what may" instead of the concrete definition of "what is."

Though attractions are much more enjoyable to look at and experience 😛
 

FerretAfros

Well-Known Member
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Maybe they will.

Dont be surprised to see walls from the monorail station to the lagoon that make DCA circa 2011 seem like child’s play.
That's quite the statement! I spent a lot of time at DLR during the run-up to DCA's relaunch, and that park was a real mess for several years. Since many posters on this WDW-centric board may not be familiar with that era, here's a quick primer on the walls that invaded the park for 3+ years:

While 2011 gets bonus points for sealing off the park's main entrance, the biggest impacts actually began in 2009, when they were simultaneously building the Little Mermaid ride and the World of Color viewing area on opposite sides of a long corridor of uninterrupted walls.
348630

Even when seen from the vantage of the ferris wheel, it was tough to grasp the magnitude of the work being done in that area
348629

And of course, that's to say nothing of the construction for World of Color itself, which was plainly visible from all around the lagoon, since it was too impractical to build walls all the way around
348631

That said, the setup from late 2010 until the big reveal in 2012 was pretty striking, literally blocking the park's main entrance with construction. They did the best that could realistically be expected, but it was a less-than-inviting experience. I found the visible equipment in this photo of the park entrance (really!) quite apropos
348634

I always laughed how the walls at the new turnstiles did everything but say "We're begging you, please come in! We're still open!" in big letters. The walking characters did a surprisingly good job helping to direct entrance traffic to the left, while the exit was on the right side
348635

And of course, once the new turnstile structure was completed, everything was shifted around and guests were immediately met with a construction wall upon entering the park, and were directed backstage behind Soarin' and dumped unceremoniously into Condor Flats
348636

Once guests made their way to the former Sunshine Plaza area, they were met with an ever-shifting array of walls to funnel them around the latest construction. It was particularly impressive to see the piecemeal progress of the Red Car Trolley tracks being installed in a non-sequential patchwork over the course of 2+ years, but miraculously everything lined up just right at the end. It was also interesting to see the constantly-evolving nature of park operations; off the top of my head, I can think of at least 3 different locations where the ElecTRONica pre-show stage was built and used for a few weeks, before moving to a new spot. And with the closure of the park's main shopping area, a fleet of temporary kiosks each offering a handful of items popped up all over the park, in an effort to make up for the lost floorspace, giving the park the atmosphere of a high-end flea market
348637

While most of this was surprisingly well organized, one of my personal favorite chaos moments was trying to navigate the narrow chute connecting the Hollywood Pictures Backlot to the rest of the park during the Disneyland Half Marathon. With tight crowds moving quickly and nowhere to move to get out of the way, it really was something so unpleasant you had to experience it in person to believe it. Keep in mind that this was before the connection between Tower of Terror and A Bug's Land opened, so this was the only way to get between some of the park's biggest headliners and the rest of the park during "normal" park operations for the better part of a year
348632

This really was an odd time to be in the park, but the anticipation of something new made it an exciting time too. There was no ignoring that the park was changing, and doing so in a drastic fashion. For those who are used to WDW non-intrusive ways of minimizing refurbishments and new construction, I'm sure this approach will come as quite a shock. Given that Epcot is physically a much larger space than DCA, I'm curious to see if that amplifies the uncomfortable feelings of claustrophobia, or if it allows adequately-sized alternate paths to be made available
 

GlacierGlacier

Well-Known Member
That's quite the statement! I spent a lot of time at DLR during the run-up to DCA's relaunch, and that park was a real mess for several years. Since many posters on this WDW-centric board may not be familiar with that era, here's a quick primer on the walls that invaded the park for 3+ years:

While 2011 gets bonus points for sealing off the park's main entrance, the biggest impacts actually began in 2009, when they were simultaneously building the Little Mermaid ride and the World of Color viewing area on opposite sides of a long corridor of uninterrupted walls.
View attachment 348630

Even when seen from the vantage of the ferris wheel, it was tough to grasp the magnitude of the work being done in that area
View attachment 348629

And of course, that's to say nothing of the construction for World of Color itself, which was plainly visible from all around the lagoon, since it was too impractical to build walls all the way around
View attachment 348631

That said, the setup from late 2010 until the big reveal in 2012 was pretty striking, literally blocking the park's main entrance with construction. They did the best that could realistically be expected, but it was a less-than-inviting experience. I found the visible equipment in this photo of the park entrance (really!) quite apropos
View attachment 348634

I always laughed how the walls at the new turnstiles did everything but say "We're begging you, please come in! We're still open!" in big letters. The walking characters did a surprisingly good job helping to direct entrance traffic to the left, while the exit was on the right side
View attachment 348635

And of course, once the new turnstile structure was completed, everything was shifted around and guests were immediately met with a construction wall upon entering the park, and were directed backstage behind Soarin' and dumped unceremoniously into Condor Flats
View attachment 348636

Once guests made their way to the former Sunshine Plaza area, they were met with an ever-shifting array of walls to funnel them around the latest construction. It was particularly impressive to see the piecemeal progress of the Red Car Trolley tracks being installed in a non-sequential patchwork over the course of 2+ years, but miraculously everything lined up just right at the end. It was also interesting to see the constantly-evolving nature of park operations; off the top of my head, I can think of at least 3 different locations where the ElecTRONica pre-show stage was built and used for a few weeks, before moving to a new spot. And with the closure of the park's main shopping area, a fleet of temporary kiosks each offering a handful of items popped up all over the park, in an effort to make up for the lost floorspace, giving the park the atmosphere of a high-end flea market
View attachment 348637

While most of this was surprisingly well organized, one of my personal favorite chaos moments was trying to navigate the narrow chute connecting the Hollywood Pictures Backlot to the rest of the park during the Disneyland Half Marathon. With tight crowds moving quickly and nowhere to move to get out of the way, it really was something so unpleasant you had to experience it in person to believe it. Keep in mind that this was before the connection between Tower of Terror and A Bug's Land opened, so this was the only way to get between some of the park's biggest headliners and the rest of the park during "normal" park operations for the better part of a year
View attachment 348632

This really was an odd time to be in the park, but the anticipation of something new made it an exciting time too. There was no ignoring that the park was changing, and doing so in a drastic fashion. For those who are used to WDW non-intrusive ways of minimizing refurbishments and new construction, I'm sure this approach will come as quite a shock. Given that Epcot is physically a much larger space than DCA, I'm curious to see if that amplifies the uncomfortable feelings of claustrophobia, or if it allows adequately-sized alternate paths to be made available
This is an amazing post and really quite helpful. As someone who didn't get to see DCA during reconstruction, I'm amazed. We may get to see this in Orlando, which could be real interesting.
 

Tayoboy

Active Member
That's quite the statement! I spent a lot of time at DLR during the run-up to DCA's relaunch, and that park was a real mess for several years. Since many posters on this WDW-centric board may not be familiar with that era, here's a quick primer on the walls that invaded the park for 3+ years:

While 2011 gets bonus points for sealing off the park's main entrance, the biggest impacts actually began in 2009, when they were simultaneously building the Little Mermaid ride and the World of Color viewing area on opposite sides of a long corridor of uninterrupted walls.
View attachment 348630

Even when seen from the vantage of the ferris wheel, it was tough to grasp the magnitude of the work being done in that area
View attachment 348629

And of course, that's to say nothing of the construction for World of Color itself, which was plainly visible from all around the lagoon, since it was too impractical to build walls all the way around
View attachment 348631

That said, the setup from late 2010 until the big reveal in 2012 was pretty striking, literally blocking the park's main entrance with construction. They did the best that could realistically be expected, but it was a less-than-inviting experience. I found the visible equipment in this photo of the park entrance (really!) quite apropos
View attachment 348634

I always laughed how the walls at the new turnstiles did everything but say "We're begging you, please come in! We're still open!" in big letters. The walking characters did a surprisingly good job helping to direct entrance traffic to the left, while the exit was on the right side
View attachment 348635

And of course, once the new turnstile structure was completed, everything was shifted around and guests were immediately met with a construction wall upon entering the park, and were directed backstage behind Soarin' and dumped unceremoniously into Condor Flats
View attachment 348636

Once guests made their way to the former Sunshine Plaza area, they were met with an ever-shifting array of walls to funnel them around the latest construction. It was particularly impressive to see the piecemeal progress of the Red Car Trolley tracks being installed in a non-sequential patchwork over the course of 2+ years, but miraculously everything lined up just right at the end. It was also interesting to see the constantly-evolving nature of park operations; off the top of my head, I can think of at least 3 different locations where the ElecTRONica pre-show stage was built and used for a few weeks, before moving to a new spot. And with the closure of the park's main shopping area, a fleet of temporary kiosks each offering a handful of items popped up all over the park, in an effort to make up for the lost floorspace, giving the park the atmosphere of a high-end flea market
View attachment 348637

While most of this was surprisingly well organized, one of my personal favorite chaos moments was trying to navigate the narrow chute connecting the Hollywood Pictures Backlot to the rest of the park during the Disneyland Half Marathon. With tight crowds moving quickly and nowhere to move to get out of the way, it really was something so unpleasant you had to experience it in person to believe it. Keep in mind that this was before the connection between Tower of Terror and A Bug's Land opened, so this was the only way to get between some of the park's biggest headliners and the rest of the park during "normal" park operations for the better part of a year
View attachment 348632

This really was an odd time to be in the park, but the anticipation of something new made it an exciting time too. There was no ignoring that the park was changing, and doing so in a drastic fashion. For those who are used to WDW non-intrusive ways of minimizing refurbishments and new construction, I'm sure this approach will come as quite a shock. Given that Epcot is physically a much larger space than DCA, I'm curious to see if that amplifies the uncomfortable feelings of claustrophobia, or if it allows adequately-sized alternate paths to be made available
Omg all those construction walls, yikes!
 

KingOfEpicocity

Well-Known Member
Something exists in its spot. Whether it was the Innovention building or a different plan, there's something in the area closest to SSE.
It would be wasteful to have such a large space in the middle of the park with nothing but TREES. But i guess that isnt a big concern right now
 
Reactions: HMF

HMF

Well-Known Member
That's quite the statement! I spent a lot of time at DLR during the run-up to DCA's relaunch, and that park was a real mess for several years. Since many posters on this WDW-centric board may not be familiar with that era, here's a quick primer on the walls that invaded the park for 3+ years:

While 2011 gets bonus points for sealing off the park's main entrance, the biggest impacts actually began in 2009, when they were simultaneously building the Little Mermaid ride and the World of Color viewing area on opposite sides of a long corridor of uninterrupted walls.
View attachment 348630

Even when seen from the vantage of the ferris wheel, it was tough to grasp the magnitude of the work being done in that area
View attachment 348629

And of course, that's to say nothing of the construction for World of Color itself, which was plainly visible from all around the lagoon, since it was too impractical to build walls all the way around
View attachment 348631

That said, the setup from late 2010 until the big reveal in 2012 was pretty striking, literally blocking the park's main entrance with construction. They did the best that could realistically be expected, but it was a less-than-inviting experience. I found the visible equipment in this photo of the park entrance (really!) quite apropos
View attachment 348634

I always laughed how the walls at the new turnstiles did everything but say "We're begging you, please come in! We're still open!" in big letters. The walking characters did a surprisingly good job helping to direct entrance traffic to the left, while the exit was on the right side
View attachment 348635

And of course, once the new turnstile structure was completed, everything was shifted around and guests were immediately met with a construction wall upon entering the park, and were directed backstage behind Soarin' and dumped unceremoniously into Condor Flats
View attachment 348636

Once guests made their way to the former Sunshine Plaza area, they were met with an ever-shifting array of walls to funnel them around the latest construction. It was particularly impressive to see the piecemeal progress of the Red Car Trolley tracks being installed in a non-sequential patchwork over the course of 2+ years, but miraculously everything lined up just right at the end. It was also interesting to see the constantly-evolving nature of park operations; off the top of my head, I can think of at least 3 different locations where the ElecTRONica pre-show stage was built and used for a few weeks, before moving to a new spot. And with the closure of the park's main shopping area, a fleet of temporary kiosks each offering a handful of items popped up all over the park, in an effort to make up for the lost floorspace, giving the park the atmosphere of a high-end flea market
View attachment 348637

While most of this was surprisingly well organized, one of my personal favorite chaos moments was trying to navigate the narrow chute connecting the Hollywood Pictures Backlot to the rest of the park during the Disneyland Half Marathon. With tight crowds moving quickly and nowhere to move to get out of the way, it really was something so unpleasant you had to experience it in person to believe it. Keep in mind that this was before the connection between Tower of Terror and A Bug's Land opened, so this was the only way to get between some of the park's biggest headliners and the rest of the park during "normal" park operations for the better part of a year
View attachment 348632

This really was an odd time to be in the park, but the anticipation of something new made it an exciting time too. There was no ignoring that the park was changing, and doing so in a drastic fashion. For those who are used to WDW non-intrusive ways of minimizing refurbishments and new construction, I'm sure this approach will come as quite a shock. Given that Epcot is physically a much larger space than DCA, I'm curious to see if that amplifies the uncomfortable feelings of claustrophobia, or if it allows adequately-sized alternate paths to be made available
It's a pity that they worked so hard and spent all that money just to mess the park up again a few years later.
 

Mr. Johnson

Well-Known Member
It's a pity that they worked so hard and spent all that money just to mess the park up again a few years later.
The true failing of DCA 2.0 was that Paradise Pier was only half renovated with whatever was left of DCA 1.0 Paradise Pier (The Carousel, shops, Ariel’s Grotto etc.) seemingly with the hope that DCA 3.0 would fix up the remnants. DCA 3.0 never happened and instead Disney seems to just be on auto-pilot with DCA, green lighting whatever will tie in with big Disney film releases that will be released within the next two years.(Both the Incredicoaster and Mission Breakout opened a short time after a film in their respective franchises was released and I’n sure the same will be true of the Jessie Carousel and Toy Story 4)
 

HMF

Well-Known Member
The true failing of DCA 2.0 was that Paradise Pier was only half renovated with whatever was left of DCA 1.0 Paradise Pier (The Carousel, shops, Ariel’s Grotto etc.) seemingly with the hope that DCA 3.0 would fix up the remnants. DCA 3.0 never happened and instead Disney seems to just be on auto-pilot with DCA, green lighting whatever will tie in with big Disney film releases that will be released within the next two years.(Both the Incredicoaster and Mission Breakout opened a short time after a film in their respective franchises was released and I’n sure the same will be true of the Jessie Carousel and Toy Story 4)
I agree but DCA 2.0 was really starting to make the park better and worth visiting. the one, two, three punch of Soarin' around the World, Mission Cashgrab and Pixar Pier ruined the whole thing.
 

yensidtlaw1969

Well-Known Member
That's quite the statement! I spent a lot of time at DLR during the run-up to DCA's relaunch, and that park was a real mess for several years. Since many posters on this WDW-centric board may not be familiar with that era, here's a quick primer on the walls that invaded the park for 3+ years:

While 2011 gets bonus points for sealing off the park's main entrance, the biggest impacts actually began in 2009, when they were simultaneously building the Little Mermaid ride and the World of Color viewing area on opposite sides of a long corridor of uninterrupted walls.
View attachment 348630

Even when seen from the vantage of the ferris wheel, it was tough to grasp the magnitude of the work being done in that area
View attachment 348629

And of course, that's to say nothing of the construction for World of Color itself, which was plainly visible from all around the lagoon, since it was too impractical to build walls all the way around
View attachment 348631

That said, the setup from late 2010 until the big reveal in 2012 was pretty striking, literally blocking the park's main entrance with construction. They did the best that could realistically be expected, but it was a less-than-inviting experience. I found the visible equipment in this photo of the park entrance (really!) quite apropos
View attachment 348634

I always laughed how the walls at the new turnstiles did everything but say "We're begging you, please come in! We're still open!" in big letters. The walking characters did a surprisingly good job helping to direct entrance traffic to the left, while the exit was on the right side
View attachment 348635

And of course, once the new turnstile structure was completed, everything was shifted around and guests were immediately met with a construction wall upon entering the park, and were directed backstage behind Soarin' and dumped unceremoniously into Condor Flats
View attachment 348636

Once guests made their way to the former Sunshine Plaza area, they were met with an ever-shifting array of walls to funnel them around the latest construction. It was particularly impressive to see the piecemeal progress of the Red Car Trolley tracks being installed in a non-sequential patchwork over the course of 2+ years, but miraculously everything lined up just right at the end. It was also interesting to see the constantly-evolving nature of park operations; off the top of my head, I can think of at least 3 different locations where the ElecTRONica pre-show stage was built and used for a few weeks, before moving to a new spot. And with the closure of the park's main shopping area, a fleet of temporary kiosks each offering a handful of items popped up all over the park, in an effort to make up for the lost floorspace, giving the park the atmosphere of a high-end flea market
View attachment 348637

While most of this was surprisingly well organized, one of my personal favorite chaos moments was trying to navigate the narrow chute connecting the Hollywood Pictures Backlot to the rest of the park during the Disneyland Half Marathon. With tight crowds moving quickly and nowhere to move to get out of the way, it really was something so unpleasant you had to experience it in person to believe it. Keep in mind that this was before the connection between Tower of Terror and A Bug's Land opened, so this was the only way to get between some of the park's biggest headliners and the rest of the park during "normal" park operations for the better part of a year
View attachment 348632

This really was an odd time to be in the park, but the anticipation of something new made it an exciting time too. There was no ignoring that the park was changing, and doing so in a drastic fashion. For those who are used to WDW non-intrusive ways of minimizing refurbishments and new construction, I'm sure this approach will come as quite a shock. Given that Epcot is physically a much larger space than DCA, I'm curious to see if that amplifies the uncomfortable feelings of claustrophobia, or if it allows adequately-sized alternate paths to be made available
I remember visiting in late 2011 and experiencing much of this -- having visited both before and after that, I can't help but feel that for all the headaches caused by the massive amount of work they did the park is ultimately not in that much better shape than it was before . . . outside of Cars Land, which is fantastic, a lot of still kind of registers as lipstick on a pig. Buena Vista Street is nicer than what was there before, but not as nice as I had hoped; it feels like it pays lip service to the Main Street concept without ever really touching on what makes Main Street so beloved. Outside of those two lands there's a lot of placemaking that's different but not significantly better than it was before. And, sadly, in time since they've done plenty to undercut the work that was done to the park during this makeover. I could take or leave World of Color, but maybe that's just me, it seems to be plenty popular. I think if Cars Land had not been part of this the Extreme Makeover of DCA would be considerably less lauded. The park's expansion efforts in the makeover were far more effective than the placemaking efforts.

I find myself a little wary of getting into this situation at Epcot. Seeing that much work happen to existing areas and having it inconvenience the guest so much sets up a lot of expectation that's much harder to deliver on than pure expansion. There's a cost of placemaking that expansion usually doesn't contend with, which is the impact on the current guest experience. Expansion often sees walls put up along what was previously considered the boundary of guest space with the promise that the boundary is being extended to your benefit, but placemaking puts them up obtrusively in the middle of guest space and builds an unattractive labyrinth. It feels like there's an onus to be much better than what was there before so that the nuisance was worth it, and expansion doesn't feel the weight of that in the same way -- a new ride is almost certain to be better than the gently landscaped area it replaces. There's also the fact that it's usually harder to do exciting work in an area "landlocked" by guest activity during the day, where true expansion generally has more freedom. So the walls most negatively impactful to guest experience stay up longer and are less likely to result in something amazing when they come down -- which is part of why it's so valuable to get placemaking right in your park from the start. It's murder to try to fix it later and is less likely to feel worth the hassle in the end.

Not that Innoventions West is especially valuable in the moment, but having to navigate walls for a while only for them to come down and reveal . . . trees? It doesn't feel like work that justifies its own existence. You want things to be better than they were when the walls went up. Is open space really better than anything they could do in the existing building? Structurally, placemaking in Future World doesn't feel like it's in the dire state that most of DCA was in before. The attraction menu is really what's wrong here. Getting rid of Innoventions because they just don't know what to do with it isn't a better idea than putting something great in there. It's not like the building has never been useful, it's just been 15-20 years since it really had things worth doing inside.

I'm happy to put up with a maze like DCA had in 2011 if on the other side is a better guest experience, but that's not as automatic as I'd like to believe. Placemaking projects like this don't always fix the actual problem, sometimes they just make the area look different.
 

iHeartDisneylandCats

Proud Member Since 2016
Something exists in its spot. Whether it was the Innovention building or a different plan, there's something in the area closest to SSE.
I never noticed that before. My guess is they were planning on keeping the Electric Umbrella infrastructure and retheming it. It wouldn't have made much sense for them to tear down Electric Umbrella only to rebuild another Quick Service a few yards away, which would have been necessary because that restaurant serves an important purpose in that location. Now it appears as though they'll not only keep that but also retheme Mouse Gear.
But the end result was well worth it
Agreed.
That's quite the statement! I spent a lot of time at DLR during the run-up to DCA's relaunch, and that park was a real mess for several years. Since many posters on this WDW-centric board may not be familiar with that era, here's a quick primer on the walls that invaded the park for 3+ years:

While 2011 gets bonus points for sealing off the park's main entrance, the biggest impacts actually began in 2009, when they were simultaneously building the Little Mermaid ride and the World of Color viewing area on opposite sides of a long corridor of uninterrupted walls.
View attachment 348630

Even when seen from the vantage of the ferris wheel, it was tough to grasp the magnitude of the work being done in that area
View attachment 348629

And of course, that's to say nothing of the construction for World of Color itself, which was plainly visible from all around the lagoon, since it was too impractical to build walls all the way around
View attachment 348631

That said, the setup from late 2010 until the big reveal in 2012 was pretty striking, literally blocking the park's main entrance with construction. They did the best that could realistically be expected, but it was a less-than-inviting experience. I found the visible equipment in this photo of the park entrance (really!) quite apropos
View attachment 348634

I always laughed how the walls at the new turnstiles did everything but say "We're begging you, please come in! We're still open!" in big letters. The walking characters did a surprisingly good job helping to direct entrance traffic to the left, while the exit was on the right side
View attachment 348635

And of course, once the new turnstile structure was completed, everything was shifted around and guests were immediately met with a construction wall upon entering the park, and were directed backstage behind Soarin' and dumped unceremoniously into Condor Flats
View attachment 348636

Once guests made their way to the former Sunshine Plaza area, they were met with an ever-shifting array of walls to funnel them around the latest construction. It was particularly impressive to see the piecemeal progress of the Red Car Trolley tracks being installed in a non-sequential patchwork over the course of 2+ years, but miraculously everything lined up just right at the end. It was also interesting to see the constantly-evolving nature of park operations; off the top of my head, I can think of at least 3 different locations where the ElecTRONica pre-show stage was built and used for a few weeks, before moving to a new spot. And with the closure of the park's main shopping area, a fleet of temporary kiosks each offering a handful of items popped up all over the park, in an effort to make up for the lost floorspace, giving the park the atmosphere of a high-end flea market
View attachment 348637

While most of this was surprisingly well organized, one of my personal favorite chaos moments was trying to navigate the narrow chute connecting the Hollywood Pictures Backlot to the rest of the park during the Disneyland Half Marathon. With tight crowds moving quickly and nowhere to move to get out of the way, it really was something so unpleasant you had to experience it in person to believe it. Keep in mind that this was before the connection between Tower of Terror and A Bug's Land opened, so this was the only way to get between some of the park's biggest headliners and the rest of the park during "normal" park operations for the better part of a year
View attachment 348632

This really was an odd time to be in the park, but the anticipation of something new made it an exciting time too. There was no ignoring that the park was changing, and doing so in a drastic fashion. For those who are used to WDW non-intrusive ways of minimizing refurbishments and new construction, I'm sure this approach will come as quite a shock. Given that Epcot is physically a much larger space than DCA, I'm curious to see if that amplifies the uncomfortable feelings of claustrophobia, or if it allows adequately-sized alternate paths to be made available
I remember that like it was yesterday. While I understand why DCA was left open during reconstruction, I think guest satisfaction during that time would have been higher if they had just closed the park entirely for a year or two. I understand that's very unreasonable for many reasons but the park was not very enjoyable circa 2011 (and for the ten years prior to that for "other reasons" ;)).
It would be wasteful to have such a large space in the middle of the park with nothing but TREES. But i guess that isnt a big concern right now
At this point, I'd rather have trees than empty buildings. At least they would be serving a purpose by producing oxygen for this Earth which can't be said about the Communicore buildings. Obviously actual attractions would be my first choice though.
 

wdizneew

Well-Known Member
Asymmetric park design is so very in right now, darling.
I could hear Edna Mode's voice when I was reading this :hilarious:

DCA 3.0 never happened and instead Disney seems to just be on auto-pilot with DCA, green lighting whatever will tie in with big Disney film releases that will be released within the next two years.(Both the Incredicoaster and Mission Breakout opened a short time after a film in their respective franchises was released and I’n sure the same will be true of the Jessie Carousel and Toy Story 4)
It just feels like DCA is the dumping ground for all IPs. This is similarly happening with Walt Disney Studios Park in Paris where they're adding Frozen and Marvel Lands. DHS is going towards that but not as extreme for the time being.
 

iHeartDisneylandCats

Proud Member Since 2016
For those of you that are interested in the DCA discussion, there is a really interesting thread in the Disneyland forum that has been very active recently.
 

Mr. Johnson

Well-Known Member
What DCA 2.0 did was mostly good, but I don't think it made DCA a good park. But, what really made the park to where it is now was ElecTRONica. Disney probably thought the success of the event was that (even thought the movie bombed) it was a success. because of being based off a new movie, instead of being a good nighttime event. Disney started promoting every blockbuster at DCA (with considerably less effort being made with very new movie promotion) and eventually that extended to the new rides (again Mission Breakout and Incredicoaster).
 

Mr. Johnson

Well-Known Member
I really liked the Frankenweenie exhibit in the Art of Animation from a few years back at DCA. One of the few film promotions in DCA after ElecTRONica. that actually put more effort than just putting a 3D preview into one of the 3D theaters.
 
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