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FL Governor tells CDC to get its act together

aliceismad

Well-Known Member
Carnival sailed from Galveston and Miami this weekend. Large ships too - Horizon and Vista. The news stories I have seen said 95% of those onboard are vaccinated.
 

Bob Harlem

Well-Known Member
I just got back yesterday from a 4 night cruise out of Miami on Freedom of the Seas. It went pretty smoothly, if the CSO gets moved to recommendations on the 18th, they'll probably drop the mask requirement but leave pretty much everything else as is. They've been doing the no mask thing from the ones that started in the Caribbean ports for a month now. Most places were pretty open regardless, only a handful of places (Bars) didn't allow unvaccinated, which tbh was just mostly kids. I don't think I saw an adult (but I really wasn't checking). They were using wristbands.

I expect things to ramp up pretty quickly if the good streak quickly. But man was the limited (about 33%) capacity really relaxing and nice, no problems finding space to do stuff or relax.

Checking in was a bit weird, but not bad, they are strict on arrival times now.
 
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aliceismad

Well-Known Member
I just got back yesterday from a 4 night cruise out of Miami on Freedom of the Seas. It went pretty smoothly, if the CSO gets moved to recommendations on the 18th, they'll probably drop the mask requirement but leave pretty much everything else as is. They've been doing the no mask thing from the ones that started in the Caribbean ports for a month now. Most places were pretty open regardless, only a handful of places (Bars) didn't allow unvaccinated, which tbh was just mostly kids. I don't think I saw an adult (but I really wasn't checking). They were using wristbands.

I expect things to ramp up pretty quickly if the good streak quickly. But man was the limited (about 33%) capacity really relaxing and nice, no problems finding space to do stuff or relax.

Checking in was a bit weird, but not bad, they are strict on arrival times now.
I'm glad you had a nice trip. Did you go ashore in Nassau, and if so, how was the experience?
 

nickys

Premium Member
Cruise lines can't bar the unvaccinated from getting on the boat.

They can, however, make them pariahs while on the boat.

Win-win.
Since those who are unvaccinated are subject to so many restrictions, then surely anyone who is vaccinated are going to want to prove they are. So are they free to show proof of their vaccination status to the cruise line voluntarily upon boarding?

Does the law in Florida and Texas allow for that? If so, problem solved. Cruise lines aren’t asking for proof but passengers can prove their status.
 

Master Yoda

Pro Star Wars geek.
Premium Member
Since those who are unvaccinated are subject to so many restrictions, then surely anyone who is vaccinated are going to want to prove they are. So are they free to show proof of their vaccination status to the cruise line voluntarily upon boarding?

Does the law in Florida and Texas allow for that? If so, problem solved. Cruise lines aren’t asking for proof but passengers can prove their status.
The cruise lines can not "require" proof to sail, but there is nothing in the current law that prevents them from asking. (the exact text of the law is posted below)The law also allows the cruise lines to set screening protocols on those that do not provide proof of vaccination.

From what we have seen so far, those that are vaccinated can do pretty much anything they want on the ships.

Those that are not must submit to COVID testing (often at their expense), and are not allowed in certain restaurants, spas, and fitness centers. They are also being restricted to certain seating for theater shows. Ports of call are also welcome to refuse passengers that can not provide proof of vaccination.


381.00316 COVID-19 vaccine documentation.—
(1) A business entity, as defined in s. 768.38 to include any business operating in this state, may not require patrons or customers to provide any documentation certifying COVID-19 vaccination or post-infection recovery to gain access to, entry upon, or service from the business operations in this state. This subsection does not otherwise restrict businesses from instituting screening protocols consistent with authoritative or controlling government-issued guidance to protect public health.
(2) A governmental entity as defined in s. 768.38 may not require persons to provide any documentation certifying COVID-19
vaccination or post-infection recovery to gain access to, entry upon, or service from the governmental entity’s operations in this state. This subsection does not otherwise restrict governmental entities from instituting screening protocols consistent with authoritative or controlling government-issued guidance to protect public health.
(3) An educational institution as defined in s. 768.38 may not require students or residents to provide any documentation certifying COVID-19 vaccination or post-infection recovery for attendance or enrollment, or to gain access to, entry upon, or service from such educational institution in this state. This subsection does not otherwise restrict educational institutions from instituting screening protocols consistent with authoritative or controlling government-issued guidance to protect public health.
(4) The department may impose a fine not to exceed $5,000 per violation.
(5) This section does not apply to a health care provider as defined in s. 768.38; a service provider licensed or certified under s. 393.17, part III of chapter 401, or part IV of chapter 468; or a provider with an active health care clinic exemption under s. 400.9935.
(6) The department may adopt rules pursuant to ss. 120.536 and 120.54 to implement this section.
 

aliceismad

Well-Known Member
I am glad that they are sticking to their guns. They said they will not have non-vaccinated guests on their cruises so I hope they are able to do so and if not then I hope they sail out of another state entirely.
I agree.



I had an NCL cruise canceled in spring 2020 by covid, so I was hoping to sail on them again sooner rather than later because we had so looked forward to that trip. However, since we're vaccinated but our daughter is not yet eligible, we may be waiting a while regardless.
 
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MisterPenguin

🐧🐧🐧🐧🐧🐧🐧🐧Fully Pfizered!🐧🐧🐧🐧🐧🐧🐧🐧
Premium Member
Lots of crow to be eaten.


Don't know if this has been discussed yet but the leadership of FL keeps winning victory after victory!
Is a victory a victory when it's been reversed? Don't eat your crow before they're hatched...



In blow to DeSantis, court blocks order lifting CDC virus rules on Florida cruise ships​

ST. PETERSBURG — A federal appeals court has temporarily blocked a judge’s ruling that sided with a Florida lawsuit challenging U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention pandemic regulations for cruise ship operation.

The one-paragraph decision by a three-judge panel of the 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals was filed at 11:50 p.m. Saturday, just minutes before a Tampa judge’s previous ruling was set to take effect.

The judges’ issuance of a temporary stay keeps the CDC regulations regarding Florida-based cruise ships in place while the CDC appeals the June decision by U.S. District Judge Steven Merryday.

The lawsuit, championed by Republican Gov. Ron DeSantis, claims that the CDC’s multiple-step process to allow cruising from Florida is overly burdensome, harming both a multibillion-dollar industry that provides some 159,000 jobs and revenue collected by the state. ...

The CDC first flatly halted cruise ships from sailing in March 2020 in response to the coronavirus pandemic, which had affected passengers and crew on numerous ships.

Then the CDC on Oct. 30 of last year imposed a four-phase conditional framework it said would allow the industry to gradually resume operations if certain thresholds were met. Those included virus mitigation procedures and a simulated cruise to test them before embarking regular passengers.

Merryday’s decision concluded that the CDC can’t enforce those rules for Florida-based ships and that they should merely be considered nonbinding recommendations or guidelines. Several cruise lines have begun preliminary cruises under those guidelines, which the Tampa judge agreed with Florida are too onerous. ...

The 11th Circuit’s brief decision did not include any opinions from the judges, which the panel said would be released later. The decision noted that one appeals judge dissented.
 

monothingie

Foiled Again by Do Gooders
Premium Member
Is a victory a victory when it's been reversed? Don't eat your crow before they're hatched...



In blow to DeSantis, court blocks order lifting CDC virus rules on Florida cruise ships​

ST. PETERSBURG — A federal appeals court has temporarily blocked a judge’s ruling that sided with a Florida lawsuit challenging U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention pandemic regulations for cruise ship operation.

The one-paragraph decision by a three-judge panel of the 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals was filed at 11:50 p.m. Saturday, just minutes before a Tampa judge’s previous ruling was set to take effect.

The judges’ issuance of a temporary stay keeps the CDC regulations regarding Florida-based cruise ships in place while the CDC appeals the June decision by U.S. District Judge Steven Merryday.

The lawsuit, championed by Republican Gov. Ron DeSantis, claims that the CDC’s multiple-step process to allow cruising from Florida is overly burdensome, harming both a multibillion-dollar industry that provides some 159,000 jobs and revenue collected by the state. ...

The CDC first flatly halted cruise ships from sailing in March 2020 in response to the coronavirus pandemic, which had affected passengers and crew on numerous ships.

Then the CDC on Oct. 30 of last year imposed a four-phase conditional framework it said would allow the industry to gradually resume operations if certain thresholds were met. Those included virus mitigation procedures and a simulated cruise to test them before embarking regular passengers.

Merryday’s decision concluded that the CDC can’t enforce those rules for Florida-based ships and that they should merely be considered nonbinding recommendations or guidelines. Several cruise lines have begun preliminary cruises under those guidelines, which the Tampa judge agreed with Florida are too onerous. ...

The 11th Circuit’s brief decision did not include any opinions from the judges, which the panel said would be released later. The decision noted that one appeals judge dissented.
And the process plays along. You think this is the end all victory against DeSantis? Really? You’re better than that.

It doesn’t mean anything regarding the merits of the case. Let’s see what happens next.
 

MisterPenguin

🐧🐧🐧🐧🐧🐧🐧🐧Fully Pfizered!🐧🐧🐧🐧🐧🐧🐧🐧
Premium Member
And the process plays along. You think this is the end all victory against DeSantis? Really? You’re better than that.

It doesn’t mean anything regarding the merits of the case. Let’s see what happens next.
You were pretty much implying it was the end-all with your 'eating crow' comment. So much for seeing how it plays out.
 

Archie123

Well-Known Member
Is a victory a victory when it's been reversed? Don't eat your crow before they're hatched...



In blow to DeSantis, court blocks order lifting CDC virus rules on Florida cruise ships​

ST. PETERSBURG — A federal appeals court has temporarily blocked a judge’s ruling that sided with a Florida lawsuit challenging U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention pandemic regulations for cruise ship operation.

The one-paragraph decision by a three-judge panel of the 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals was filed at 11:50 p.m. Saturday, just minutes before a Tampa judge’s previous ruling was set to take effect.

The judges’ issuance of a temporary stay keeps the CDC regulations regarding Florida-based cruise ships in place while the CDC appeals the June decision by U.S. District Judge Steven Merryday.

The lawsuit, championed by Republican Gov. Ron DeSantis, claims that the CDC’s multiple-step process to allow cruising from Florida is overly burdensome, harming both a multibillion-dollar industry that provides some 159,000 jobs and revenue collected by the state. ...

The CDC first flatly halted cruise ships from sailing in March 2020 in response to the coronavirus pandemic, which had affected passengers and crew on numerous ships.

Then the CDC on Oct. 30 of last year imposed a four-phase conditional framework it said would allow the industry to gradually resume operations if certain thresholds were met. Those included virus mitigation procedures and a simulated cruise to test them before embarking regular passengers.

Merryday’s decision concluded that the CDC can’t enforce those rules for Florida-based ships and that they should merely be considered nonbinding recommendations or guidelines. Several cruise lines have begun preliminary cruises under those guidelines, which the Tampa judge agreed with Florida are too onerous. ...

The 11th Circuit’s brief decision did not include any opinions from the judges, which the panel said would be released later. The decision noted that one appeals judge dissented.

Some people forget how the court system works. Even this isn't done yet as me thinks it will wind up in the Supreme Court which I do think will side with the cruise companies.
 

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