News Disneyland to give Snow White’s Scary Adventures dark ride a major facelift in 2020

mickEblu

Well-Known Member
Thank you, I thought I was the only one who remembered that Disneyland had plans to rehab all the Fantasyland dark rides for the 60th. But Colglazier got cold feet and cut that budget and only did entertainment for the 60th instead.

It's hysterical that this minor rehab became a news item in the OC Register. Must have been a slow news day.

On the bright side, thank goodness Disneyland still has seven (7!) different dark rides like this to choose from (with an extra one over in DCA, just in case). What is WDW down to, about two (2) of these Walt Disney era dark rides? They've got Peter Pan and Pooh in all of WDW, and.... that's it.

Because they just don't have much space in WDW to do much else. :rolleyes:

DCA has two. Or are we not counting Mermaid?
 

TP2000

Well-Known Member
Advertisement
DCA has two. Or are we not counting Mermaid?

No, we're not counting DCA's Little Mermaid.

Nor are we counting the cloned version they built in Card Walker's Magic Kingdom Park out in the swamp.

We're only counting Walt Disney era dark rides; two-to-six passenger vehicles travelling along a little bus-bar ride system in the dark. Usually in Fantasyland, and always dealing with animated motion pictures.

Little Mermaid is an Omnimover, like The Haunted Mansion, or various versions of Buzz Lightyear, or Adventure Thru Inner Space, Presented by Monsanto or that lame Eastern Airlines version they had in WDW.

Since this is the Disneyland side of this forum, we are using the traditional Disneyland definition of a "Dark Ride". Disneyland has seven (7!) of them, with an extra in DCA. WDW only has two left, and they have four of them in Tokyo, and only one or two each in Paris, Hong Kong and Shanghai. It's an art form that Walt Disney and his team elevated and refined in the 1950's, and Disneyland is the powerhouse when it comes to them. Dark rides! 🧐
 

THE 1HAPPY HAUNT

Well-Known Member
No, we're not counting DCA's Little Mermaid.

Nor are we counting the cloned version they built in Card Walker's Magic Kingdom Park out in the swamp.

We're only counting Walt Disney era dark rides; two-to-six passenger vehicles travelling along a little bus-bar ride system in the dark. Usually in Fantasyland, and always dealing with animated motion pictures.

Little Mermaid is an Omnimover, like The Haunted Mansion, or various versions of Buzz Lightyear, or Adventure Thru Inner Space, Presented by Monsanto or that lame Eastern Airlines version they had in WDW.

Since this is the Disneyland side of this forum, we are using the traditional Disneyland definition of a "Dark Ride". Disneyland has seven (7!) of them, with an extra in DCA. WDW only has two left, and they have four of them in Tokyo, and only one or two each in Paris, Hong Kong and Shanghai. It's an art form that Walt Disney and his team elevated and refined in the 1950's, and Disneyland is the powerhouse when it comes to them. Dark rides! 🧐
What is the one in DCA? I can't think of which one you are referring to?
 

TP2000

Well-Known Member
Paris has 3. Pinocchio, Snow White and Peter Pan.

Ooh, you're right. Viva la France! 🇫🇷 And with thanks to Tony Baxter.

8 in Anaheim (Snow White, Pinocchio, Mr. Toad, Peter Pan, Alice, Roger Rabbit, Pooh, Monsters Inc.)
4 in Tokyo (Snow White, Pinocchio, Peter Pan, Monsters Inc.)
3 in Paris (Pinocchio, Snow White, Peter Pan)
2 in Orlando, Shanghai (Peter Pan, Pooh)
1 in Hong Kong (Pooh)

I consider Pooh in Tokyo something else, perhaps even an E Ticket. But definitely at least at D Ticket and way more than a traditional Dark Ride.
 

Animaniac93-98

Well-Known Member
Ooh, you're right. Viva la France!🇫🇷 And with thanks to Tony Baxter.

8 in Anaheim (Snow White, Pinocchio, Mr. Toad, Peter Pan, Alice, Roger Rabbit, Pooh, Monsters Inc.)
4 in Tokyo (Snow White, Pinocchio, Peter Pan, Monsters Inc.)
3 in Paris (Pinocchio, Snow White, Peter Pan)
2 in Orlando, Shanghai (Peter Pan, Pooh)
1 in Hong Kong (Pooh)

I consider Pooh in Tokyo something else, perhaps even an E Ticket. But definitely at least at D Ticket and way more than a traditional Dark Ride.

Tokyo has Roger Rabbit too.

I'd also say Monsters, Inc. in Tokyo is much more than a bus bar dark ride. It's an E for sure.
 

TP2000

Well-Known Member
Tokyo has Roger Rabbit too.

I'd also say Monsters, Inc. in Tokyo is much more than a bus bar dark ride. It's an E for sure.

Okay, you're right again. Even though it's Saturday night, I just need to put down the Chardonnay and focus! :oops:

Let's try this...

8 in Anaheim (Snow White, Pinocchio, Mr. Toad, Peter Pan, Alice, Roger Rabbit, Pooh, Monsters Inc.)
4 in Tokyo (Snow White, Pinocchio, Peter Pan, Roger Rabbit)
3 in Paris (Pinocchio, Snow White, Peter Pan)
2 in Orlando, Shanghai (Peter Pan, Pooh)
1 in Hong Kong (Pooh)
 

brb1006

Well-Known Member
WDW had two versions of Snow White.

The original ride was crazy and scary in a way no other version was or has been since. It was one of those "they'll never build this again" moments in WED history. The load area and first half of the Tokyo version is the closest thing we have, and even that has some set and stylistic changes.

The 1994 version which closed in 2012 was longer than the Disneyland ride, but had a lack of movement to a number of scenes and props. It got praise for having a "proper" ending (IMO, not that important) and certainly was better than the Meet and Greet (!!) that occupies the space now, but Disneyland's version has better design and pacing.

Toad was better for sure. Two tracks, each with different scenes, though some the same and larger rooms for cars to pass through. Some scenes you could see riders in cars going by on the other track. A different style to the whole thing that fit the tone of the ride better. The queue and exterior were obviously less impressive, but everything else was arguably better.
Original WDW version of Snow White's Adventures.

WDW version of Mr Toad's Wild Ride

Track A

Track B
 

Rich T

Well-Known Member
Seriously, talk about having an awkward ending.
Simply removing the words “And they all lived Happily Ever After” would improve the ride 100%. Ending with the boulder is good enough; it worked for the original for 26 years.
(EDIT)
Actually, they should just replace the words “And they all lived happily ever after” with “Die, Witch, Die!” 😃
 
Last edited:

Rich T

Well-Known Member
Toad was better for sure. Two tracks, each with different scenes, though some the same and larger rooms for cars to pass through. Some scenes you could see riders in cars going by on the other track. A different style to the whole thing that fit the tone of the ride better. The queue and exterior were obviously less impressive, but everything else was arguably better.
Only if you’re talking about the excellent Police Vs. Weasels side. The Gypsy Camp side was dull. I still would rate the revamped DL ride as the best overall version, (acknowledging it added many ideas from WDW), but I can see why many would put the right-side WDW Toad at #1.
 

mharrington

Well-Known Member
Only if you’re talking about the excellent Police Vs. Weasels side. The Gypsy Camp side was dull. I still would rate the revamped DL ride as the best overall version, (acknowledging it added many ideas from WDW), but I can see why many would put the right-side WDW Toad at #1.

Back in the day, most guides like Birnbaum and even the WDW Explorer CD-Rom didn't mention the left side of the ride at all. It was always the right, as they mentioned crashing through a fireplace and almost getting hit by a falling suit of armor in Toad Hall, following by racing across a barnyard and crashing through haystacks, barn doors and a chicken coop. Interestingly, the description then skips right to the penultimate scene of a collision with a train.
 

Register on WDWMAGIC. This sidebar will go away, and you'll see fewer ads.

Top Bottom