Disney Skyliner shutdown and evacuation - October 6 2019

GoofGoof

Premium Member
As the anxiety levels rise among onboard guests, the situation can turn into an emergency very quickly. Reports that I've seen said that two people (on different gondolas) went unconscious during their ordeal. That constitutes a medical emergency. And until medical help can arrive, someone needs to monitor the pulse and respiration of those unconscious victims.

Just report your situation to 911 and let them make the call.
Again, If it’s an emergency call 911. Your original post said if people are stuck and feel they aren’t getting enough info from Disney they should light up 911. That’s wrong. They should light up Disney’s customer service line. Calling 911 is only for an emergency, not to complain. I don’t care if it’s 5 minutes or 5 hours. It’s obvious that people knew they were trapped up there. There were CMs and other guests everywhere. It’s not like someone getting trapped in an elevator and calling 911 because they don’t know if anyone realizes they are in there.
 

GoofGoof

Premium Member
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Well, one good thing about the Skyliner is that they'll be able to give everyone who called 911 without an emergency a citation as they step off at the nearest station.
I don’t think they need to go that far but it’s irresponsible to advocate people making a call to 911 because they are frustrated with a lack of information or the speed of the repair.

Not that anyone really listens to me anyway, but if you are on the gondolas and they get stuck don’t call 911 unless you really need emergency responders right away. Call Disney, call the non-emergency police number, call your therapist, call your lawyer to start the paperwork on your lawsuit...just leave the 911 operators to deal with life and death emergencies.
 

donsullivan

Premium Member
Different audience.
I don't understand this attitude I keep seeing in this thread that guests are not responsible for their actions simply because they are at Disney World. People need to get over this belief/attitude that once they cross under that arch on the way to the property you are no longer responsible for your actions and blame Disney for their own behavior. As many have said above, 911 is for actual emergencies, not to complain, not to find out what's going on- full stop. And being uncomfortable on a gondola is not an emergency. What if someone else, somewhere else on the property had a medical emergency while they were tying up the operators complaining about being stuck on the gondola and they could not get through.

Each and every one of these guests is responsible for how they personally reacted to this event and the impact their actions had on all of the other guests stuck during the event. You don't surrender your responsibility to be a reasonable member of the world just because you are at WDW. It's yet another example of entitled guests demanding that Disney do whatever they what the minute they want it and then complaining to everyone around them when that didn't happen.
 
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Clyde Birdbrain

Unknown Member
Premium Member
I need to sign up for additional life insurance and my will updated before riding this suicide in the sky.
I actually didn’t think too much about anything going wrong when we did these cable cars in China. Now that people were stuck at Disney I wonder how often this happens in the mountains.

Some of these cable cars are pretty old too. We rode the car below at the Great Wall at Mutianyu that was used by Bill Clinton in 1998, so that one is over 20 years old.

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sedati

Well-Known Member
*Disclaimer* I don't mean to demean those who have endured legitimate hardships but...

I think the difference between being inconvenienced in the real world vs Disney is the idea that Disney will give you free stuff. There were people who felt a Disney Cruise was suitable compensation for being stuck in a gondola. That doesn't happen elsewhere- at least not to such an extreme extent. I rely of public transportation and have been through all manner of issues including a vehicle crashing into a building, and never once received an apology (beyond automated announcements) or any form of compensation.
Most people in a bad situation try and cooperate and get through it. Disney is up against people who want to escalate in order to maximize freebies or get that last great American dream- the out of court settlement.
 

Phil12

Well-Known Member
Again, If it’s an emergency call 911. Your original post said if people are stuck and feel they aren’t getting enough info from Disney they should light up 911. That’s wrong. They should light up Disney’s customer service line. Calling 911 is only for an emergency, not to complain. I don’t care if it’s 5 minutes or 5 hours. It’s obvious that people knew they were trapped up there. There were CMs and other guests everywhere. It’s not like someone getting trapped in an elevator and calling 911 because they don’t know if anyone realizes they are in there.
As was clearly demonstrated during the last incident, Disney did a terrible job trying to solve the problem. You may desire to stay stranded in a gondola for five hours, but if I'm in that same gondola with you, I'll be on my cell phone calling 911. Being stranded in an inaccessible location for five hours is an emergency. And you can report me for making a non-emergency call to 911.

The bottom line is that Disney does not want to appear to be foolish and incapable. And so what if Disney CM's know the gondola's are stranded? Heck, they're the people that caused the stranding! And as hours dragged on you can't reasonably expect a sane person not to attempt to summon help.

It's a wonder that some guests didn't destroy the intercom speakers rather than listen to three hours of, "Please stay seated as your Skyliner will return to flight at any moment.". The ad nauseam of the repeated announcement was most likely enough to make some guests vomit.

And, as has been mentioned, the only good point for Disney was that this previous incident occurred at night so they were spared the problems associated with heat exhaustion. In addition there are still many unanswered questions. Disney has stonewalled about the incident and that indicates that they don't want the public to know the who, what, when, where, why and how of the facts that caused the problems. And that lack of candor tells me they are not to be trusted.

Also, I haven't done the math, but I would guess that if the gondolas are full of guests, there must be several hundred people on any given line. Out of that number I would expect if the line stops for more than 20 minutes, if only one person called 911 for help with a medical emergency then that entire line is going to come under intense scrutiny.

Let's all hope Disney has learned from the incident. But since the public doesn't know about what Disney learned or what changes they may have made, we can neither trust nor verify if things have gotten any better.
 

GoofGoof

Premium Member
As was clearly demonstrated during the last incident, Disney did a terrible job trying to solve the problem. You may desire to stay stranded in a gondola for five hours, but if I'm in that same gondola with you, I'll be on my cell phone calling 911. Being stranded in an inaccessible location for five hours is an emergency. And you can report me for making a non-emergency call to 911.

The bottom line is that Disney does not want to appear to be foolish and incapable. And so what if Disney CM's know the gondola's are stranded? Heck, they're the people that caused the stranding! And as hours dragged on you can't reasonably expect a sane person not to attempt to summon help.

It's a wonder that some guests didn't destroy the intercom speakers rather than listen to three hours of, "Please stay seated as your Skyliner will return to flight at any moment.". The ad nauseam of the repeated announcement was most likely enough to make some guests vomit.

And, as has been mentioned, the only good point for Disney was that this previous incident occurred at night so they were spared the problems associated with heat exhaustion. In addition there are still many unanswered questions. Disney has stonewalled about the incident and that indicates that they don't want the public to know the who, what, when, where, why and how of the facts that caused the problems. And that lack of candor tells me they are not to be trusted.

Also, I haven't done the math, but I would guess that if the gondolas are full of guests, there must be several hundred people on any given line. Out of that number I would expect if the line stops for more than 20 minutes, if only one person called 911 for help with a medical emergency then that entire line is going to come under intense scrutiny.

Let's all hope Disney has learned from the incident. But since the public doesn't know about what Disney learned or what changes they may have made, we can neither trust nor verify if things have gotten any better.
Anyone involved with this incident has a major axe to grind with Disney. That has nothing to do with the 911 system. Advocating that everyone who is stuck on the gondolas should dial 911 is plain wrong. Nobody should be lighting up any 911 lines in protest of Disney’s poor handling of the situation.
 

Phil12

Well-Known Member
Anyone involved with this incident has a major axe to grind with Disney. That has nothing to do with the 911 system. Advocating that everyone who is stuck on the gondolas should dial 911 is plain wrong. Nobody should be lighting up any 911 lines in protest of Disney’s poor handling of the situation.
As previously stated, the sheer number of guests on any given line will ensure calls going out to 911 in the case of any extended stop of the Skyliner. Cell phones are ubiquitous. Stranded guests will decide what is an emergency.
 

MrMcDuck

Premium Member
Folks with medical conditions are going to be on every line and every day of Skyliner operation:
People that don't understand mdcpr's "different audience" need to read that entire article. Disney gets a lot of guests with physical and mental health issues. Add in the families with overprotective parents factor, which is going to be significant at a place like WDW, and you have the recipe for chaos when these things break down and aren't handled well. We all wish it weren't so, but that doesn't change the fact that it is so.
 

Tanna Eros

Well-Known Member
People that don't understand mdcpr's "different audience" need to read that entire article. Disney gets a lot of guests with physical and mental health issues. Add in the families with overprotective parents factor, which is going to be significant at a place like WDW, and you have the recipe for chaos when these things break down and aren't handled well. We all wish it weren't so, but that doesn't change the fact that it is so.
I believe you are onto something. The people that would go cliff climbing or scuba diving are off doing just that, not meandering around Disney parks. Disney is for people that want a safer environment, or else they would be cliff climbing, too. Maybe that's what's so surprising when something that even seems unsafe happens at the park.
 

mdcpr

Well-Known Member
People that don't understand mdcpr's "different audience" need to read that entire article. Disney gets a lot of guests with physical and mental health issues. Add in the families with overprotective parents factor, which is going to be significant at a place like WDW, and you have the recipe for chaos when these things break down and aren't handled well. We all wish it weren't so, but that doesn't change the fact that it is so.
Thank you.
 

mergatroid

Well-Known Member
As was clearly demonstrated during the last incident, Disney did a terrible job trying to solve the problem. You may desire to stay stranded in a gondola for five hours, but if I'm in that same gondola with you, I'll be on my cell phone calling 911. Being stranded in an inaccessible location for five hours is an emergency. And you can report me for making a non-emergency call to 911.

The bottom line is that Disney does not want to appear to be foolish and incapable. And so what if Disney CM's know the gondola's are stranded? Heck, they're the people that caused the stranding! And as hours dragged on you can't reasonably expect a sane person not to attempt to summon help.

It's a wonder that some guests didn't destroy the intercom speakers rather than listen to three hours of, "Please stay seated as your Skyliner will return to flight at any moment.". The ad nauseam of the repeated announcement was most likely enough to make some guests vomit.

And, as has been mentioned, the only good point for Disney was that this previous incident occurred at night so they were spared the problems associated with heat exhaustion. In addition there are still many unanswered questions. Disney has stonewalled about the incident and that indicates that they don't want the public to know the who, what, when, where, why and how of the facts that caused the problems. And that lack of candor tells me they are not to be trusted.

Also, I haven't done the math, but I would guess that if the gondolas are full of guests, there must be several hundred people on any given line. Out of that number I would expect if the line stops for more than 20 minutes, if only one person called 911 for help with a medical emergency then that entire line is going to come under intense scrutiny.

Let's all hope Disney has learned from the incident. But since the public doesn't know about what Disney learned or what changes they may have made, we can neither trust nor verify if things have gotten any better.
Would you do the same if you were stuck in traffic for 3 hours unable to leave your car? If you have a medical condition that's one thing, but if not do you think that call is a great use of the time of those manning the 911 switchboard? I mean if you've no medical condition and others have who are in the same predicament, do you feel the emergency services should be trying to get you out at the same time?

Whilst a terrible experience for those involved, in a scenario like the one that happened surely all the guests must have known that Disney were aware of the issues and that decisions (right or wrong) were being made. Personally if it were me in the skyliner for 3 hours not moving then I'd be very angry with what was happening (or not happening) and no doubt tired and uncomfortable. I'd be feeling let down and also be thinking "Surely Disney could do better or let me know what's going on" and "I expect a big apology for this".

However I'd also realise the the cabin I'm in is perfectly safe hanging there. Uncomfortable, stressful and boring yes, but safe and not going to fall. I'd also guess that I'm nowhere near the point of starving to death or dying of thirst, so I wouldn't be unduly worried about that at this point. So if I'm healthy, my cabin's not on fire, then personally I'd think calling 911 would be completely irresponsible. I'd think Disney were irresponsible or unprepared too, however two wrongs don't make a right and I absolutely wouldn't want to dial 911 to say I'm healthy with no urgent needs but want to be 'rescued' with hundreds of other people.
 

Heppenheimer

Well-Known Member
Just checking, does everyone realize that the main reason why the stoppage lasted so long was not the original mechanical issue but because guests had called 911 and EMS thus decided they needed to attempt a rescue? (And the rescue was for a panic attack?). The phrase "self-fulfilling prophecy" comes to mind.
 

KrzyKtty

Well-Known Member
When you take any form of transportation, especially public, you have to accept a level of risk inherent with it.

When you get on any Gondala system, you are accepting the risk that something may go very wrong and you will be stranded. The risk statically may be small, but it is there. Odds are your plane probably won't crash, but sometimes they do. If you are not ok being stranded ever, then don't ride.

I'm not saying Disney handled the situation well. I'm not even saying that it crashing 6 days after opening is acceptable. However if your reaction to being stranded is to freak out, then maybe you should ride the bus. These are individual cars hanging 60 ft off the ground and spaced far apart. There is no real way to evacuate it except at a snail's pace. If you take the things and something happens, you have to realize that a three hour evacuation is a real possibility. You accepted that reality by getting on anyway.

And while Disney isn't being very upfront, even if the intercoms can air live message relays, I don't blame Disney for not telling anyone 60ft off the ground that there was a literal crash. It was probably Disney's poor attempt at staving off an even worse mass panic.
 

mergatroid

Well-Known Member
Just checking, does everyone realize that the main reason why the stoppage lasted so long was not the original mechanical issue but because guests had called 911 and EMS thus decided they needed to attempt a rescue? (And the rescue was for a panic attack?). The phrase "self-fulfilling prophecy" comes to mind.
I think the majority off us do there Heppenheimer, no harm pointing it out again though.
 
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