Disney Charm. Where have you gone?

mickEblu

Well-Known Member
Original Poster
When was the last time Disney built something at DLR that felt.... Disney? That had the character and charm of the beloved attractions that were synonymous with Disneyland?

Galaxies Edge? No. Pixar Pier? Obviously not. Little Mermaid? Nope. They literally de-Disneyfied TOT and turned it into a Universal ride. Avengers Campus will undoubtedly be less charming than Bugs Land even if it will be more fun for a broader demographic/ age group. Both can be true.

Fantasyland Faire? I guess it does have that old school Fantasyland charm and feels intimate. Although it’s a downgrade from what it replaced. I do like the path to Rancho Del Zocalo though.

So what does that leave? Grizzly Peak Airfield? Ok cool, they planted trees and the station wagon is cool. So basically out of millions of dollars spent this decade they managed to create almost nothing that feels like... Disneyland. We got Tropical Hideaway and maybe Fantasyland Faire depending on who you ask and what mood I’m in.

So obviously the huge hole in my argument is the Anamoly that is RSR/ Cars Land. Gone on record many times saying it’s probably my third favorite land at DCA but it and it’s signature attraction are obviously quality even if I don’t spend a whole lot of time there. You can make the argument however that RSR doesnt quite have that that special X factor that most of the beloved Disneyland attractions have but I guess that’s Ok as it’s not in Disneyland and still has a special place at the resort.

It appears that Disney only has two or three types of attractions they can give us now. Irreverent , Princess / cookie cutter book report rides... and Star Wars. There is no room for the mysterious, weird or scary.
 
Last edited:

TP2000

Well-Known Member
When was the last time Disney built something at DLR that felt.... Disney? That had the character and charm of the beloved attractions that were synonymous with Disneyland?

Galaxies Edge? No. Pixar Pier? Obviously not. Little Mermaid? Nope. They literally de-Disneyfied TOT and turned it into a Universal ride. Avengers Campus will undoubtedly be less charming than Bugs Land even if it will more fun for a broader demographic/ age group. Both can be true.

Fantasyland Faire? I guess it does have that old school Fantasyland charm and feels intimate. Although it’s a downgrade from what it replaced. I do like the path to Rancho Del Zocalo though.

So what does that leave? Grizzly Peak Airfield? Ok cool, they planted trees and the station wagon is cool. So basically out of millions of dollars spent this decade they managed to create almost nothing that feels like... Disneyland. We got Tropical Hideaway and maybe Fantasyland Faire depending on who you ask and what mood I’m in.

So obviously the huge hole in my argument is the Anamoly that is RSR/ Cars Land. Gone on record many times saying it’s probably my third favorite land at DCA but it and it’s signature attraction are obviously quality even if I don’t spend a whole lot of time there. You can make the argument however that RSR doesnt quite have that that special X factor that most of the beloved Disneyland attractions have but I guess that’s Ok as it’s not in Disneyland and still has a special place at the resort.

It appears that Disney only has two or three types of attractions they can give us now. Irreverent , Princess / cookie cutter book report rides... and Star Wars. There is no room for the mysterious, weird or scary.

That's a really brilliant point and an interesting summary.

I can't add much, except to remind us all that the additions to the Disneyland Resort in the past decade are not just "millions of dollars", but it actually adds up to over 1 Billion dollars in additions; from Paradise Gardens debut in 2010 through the completion of Star Wars Land in 2019. Well over $1 Billion.
 

TP2000

Well-Known Member
Why are you here then and why randomly bring this up?

Hello, welcome to the Disneyland forum! :)

I believe @mickEblu is here like the rest of us, because he likes Disneyland and its long history and enjoys talking about it. Just look at his avatar; it's a clip of the first drop on Pirates taken from the 1967 episode of Wonderful World of Color titled "From Pirates of the Caribbean to the World of Tomorrow", and if that's not a cool way to announce your Disneyland street cred than I don't know what is.

I would also have to agree with his assessment of the recent smaller projects added to Disneyland that still have an element of that classic Walt charm. From most charming to not quite as charming, I would rank that list;

  1. Fantasyland Faire (a super cute way to extend the land, and extend its 1983 remake very nicely)
  2. Cars Land (it's big and bold, but the details were never overlooked and it's amazing what you can find there)
  3. Grizzly Peak Airfield (setting it circa 1961 was a surprising move, but it really works! That 1960 Studebaker is brilliant)
The one thing I didn't see him mention that I think deserves recognition is Buena Vista Street, especially when it first opened in 2012. They really worked hard on that, and it shows. Sadly, the mall managers who are in charge of those stores got to redo stuff after the Imagineers moved on to their next project, and the window displays have devolved from their circa 1928 Historic Americana brilliance into circa 2019 Made In China Crap You Don't Actually Need.

But Star Wars Land? And Pixar Pier? And The Little Mermaid? It's either bland, or vapid, or cheap looking. Sometimes it's all three of those things, in the case of most of Pixar Pier.

As a reminder of how cool and charming everything Walt made for Disneyland was, here's the 1967 episode of Wonderful World of Color that should be mandatory viewing for any Disneyland fan and whoever the latest Burbank executive is who sits in the Disneyland President office for six to 18 months before moving on. It's fabulous!!

 
Last edited:

Queen of the WDW Scene

Well-Known Member
In the Parks
No
Hello, welcome to the Disneyland forum! :)

I believe @mickEblu is here like the rest of us, because he likes Disneyland and its long history and enjoys talking about it. Just look at his avatar; it's a clip of the first drop on Pirates taken from the 1967 episode of Wonderful World of Color titled "From Pirates of the Caribbean to the World of Tomorrow", and if that's not a cool way to announce your Disneyland street cred than I don't know what is.

I would also have to agree with his assessment of the recent smaller projects added to Disneyland that still have an element of that classic Walt charm. From most charming to not quite as charming, I would rank that list;

  1. Fantasyland Faire (a super cute way to extend the land, and extend its 1983 remake very nicely)
  2. Cars Land (it's big and bold, but the details were never overlooked and it's amazing what you can find there)
  3. Grizzly Peak Airfield (setting it circa 1961 was a surprising move, but it really works! That 1960 Studebaker is brilliant)
The one thing I didn't see him mention that I think deserves recognition is Buena Vista Street, especially when it first opened in 2012. They really worked hard on that, and it shows. Sadly, the mall managers who are in charge of those stores got to redo stuff after the Imagineers moved on to their next project, and the window displays have devolved from their circa 1928 Historic Americana brilliance into circa 2019 Made In China Crap You Don't Actually Need.

But Star Wars Land? And Pixar Pier? And The Little Mermaid? It's either bland, or vapid, or cheap looking. Sometimes it's all three of those things, in the case of most of Pixar Pier.

I guess I just don't understand why people feel the need to lament about things at random and so long after they have changed.
Its always my suggestion that when something has changed to the point that you are no longer happy then move on.
I've done it with various things including theme parks. To each their own though I guess.
 

TP2000

Well-Known Member
I guess I just don't understand why people feel the need to lament about things at random and so long after they have changed.
Its always my suggestion that when something has changed to the point that you are no longer happy then move on.
I've done it with various things including theme parks. To each their own though I guess.

Yeah, it's a Disneyland thing. We have very high standards for our theme parks out West.
 

mickEblu

Well-Known Member
Original Poster
That's a really brilliant point and an interesting summary.

I can't add much, except to remind us all that the additions to the Disneyland Resort in the past decade are not just "millions of dollars", but it actually adds up to over 1 Billion dollars in additions; from Paradise Gardens debut in 2010 through the completion of Star Wars Land in 2019. Well over $1 Billion.

True. Well over a Billion. Galaxies Edge made sure of that. Also thanks for reminding me about Paradise Gardens. That’s one of my favorite areas at DCA.
 
Last edited:

Brer Oswald

Well-Known Member
The Disney charm of the past is long gone. Walt and the older staff had a lot to do with what made his company charming. After Winnie the Pooh, the films started to lack that charm they were known for.

Imagineering hung on for a bit longer. The first wave was able to teach the second generation well. But after that, things started to fall out. There’s still a few standout people, but overall, it just isn’t taught like it used to.

A lot of the charm lives on in Fantasyland, Adventureland, Main Street, And Frontierland. (Of course, there’s also Pirates and Mansion.) As long as that remains, so do I as a fan. Tomorrowland desperately needs a boost in charm.

Note: I also find ToonTown pretty charming. The designers took special care and attention towards the original 30s cartoons, with the music and details.
 

TP2000

Well-Known Member
True. Well over Billion. Galaxies Edge made sure of that. Also thanks for reminding me about Paradise Gardens. That’s one of my favorite areas at DCA.

I remember the figures widely thrown around on the Internet for Cars Land was $600 Million in 2012, with about half that going towards the Radiator Springs Racers ride.

If Cars Land was $600 Million in 2010-2012, then I'm sure Star Wars Land was at least that in 2017-2019. Heck, if you were to sit down and do some Googling and add this up, it might all be over the 1.5 Billion mark heading towards 2 Billion.

But I hate math and I'm supposed to be taking my Disco nap before tonight's dinner party so I can be a gracious host who looks at least 10 years younger than I am, so I can't do that math right now.
 

mickEblu

Well-Known Member
Original Poster
Hello, welcome to the Disneyland forum! :)

I believe @mickEblu is here like the rest of us, because he likes Disneyland and its long history and enjoys talking about it. Just look at his avatar; it's a clip of the first drop on Pirates taken from the 1967 episode of Wonderful World of Color titled "From Pirates of the Caribbean to the World of Tomorrow", and if that's not a cool way to announce your Disneyland street cred than I don't know what is.

I would also have to agree with his assessment of the recent smaller projects added to Disneyland that still have an element of that classic Walt charm. From most charming to not quite as charming, I would rank that list;

  1. Fantasyland Faire (a super cute way to extend the land, and extend its 1983 remake very nicely)
  2. Cars Land (it's big and bold, but the details were never overlooked and it's amazing what you can find there)
  3. Grizzly Peak Airfield (setting it circa 1961 was a surprising move, but it really works! That 1960 Studebaker is brilliant)
The one thing I didn't see him mention that I think deserves recognition is Buena Vista Street, especially when it first opened in 2012. They really worked hard on that, and it shows. Sadly, the mall managers who are in charge of those stores got to redo stuff after the Imagineers moved on to their next project, and the window displays have devolved from their circa 1928 Historic Americana brilliance into circa 2019 Made In China Crap You Don't Actually Need.

But Star Wars Land? And Pixar Pier? And The Little Mermaid? It's either bland, or vapid, or cheap looking. Sometimes it's all three of those things, in the case of most of Pixar Pier.

As a reminder of how cool and charming everything Walt made for Disneyland was, here's the 1967 episode of Wonderful World of Color that should be mandatory viewing for any Disneyland fan and whoever the latest Burbank executive is who sits in the Disneyland President office for six to 18 months before moving on. It's fabulous!!



Lol see, TP gets it. Great post.

And yes I forgot about BVS. They did a great job there.
 

Mousertainment

Well-Known Member
I was going to say Buena Vista Street but TP2000 beat me to it!

2012 was the beginning of a brief glorious period for DCA.

At BVS you could find the Red Car Trolley News Boys, Five & Dime, and at Christmastime the Buena Vista Street Community Bell Ringers (the most Christmassy Christmas joy ever in that park!). Across from Soarin' you could find the adorable Minnie's Fly Girls show.

And in the Hollywood Backlot in the evenings, my friends and I rocked out with the band at The Mad T Party in a gloriously madly themed area with food & drink locations and an arcade and extra performances from aerialists to stilt-walking flamingoes and more!

So glad I was there in its heyday! 😍

Now the only one of those left is Five & Dime (hopefully!), who I still love. But a lot of the charm of the area was sadly downsized in recent years. :(
 

TrainChasers

Well-Known Member
The Red Car Trolley is the most traditional Disneyland item they’ve added in a long time. The trolley itself, the sounds, the wig-wag signals, and the various stations really set the scene. It was pretty close to perfect theme wise when it traveled to the tower hotel.

I love cars land. Sure I would have rather had Kevin’s original non-ip “Car Land” but it’s still a wonderful land to visit.

Also world of color is amazing.

But otherwise i agree with the OP, bugs land was a charming area to walk through when walking from the tower to Cars land, it provided a translation that just somehow worked.

Pixar Pier made that area worse imho... it wasn’t a masterpiece to begin with but it’s really enberassigly plastic and bad now.

Star Wars... hey at least we got some pretty rocks to look at! There’s a small positive.
 

Curious Constance

Well-Known Member
When was the last time Disney built something at DLR that felt.... Disney? That had the character and charm of the beloved attractions that were synonymous with Disneyland?

Galaxies Edge? No. Pixar Pier? Obviously not. Little Mermaid? Nope. They literally de-Disneyfied TOT and turned it into a Universal ride. Avengers Campus will undoubtedly be less charming than Bugs Land even if it will be more fun for a broader demographic/ age group. Both can be true.

Fantasyland Faire? I guess it does have that old school Fantasyland charm and feels intimate. Although it’s a downgrade from what it replaced. I do like the path to Rancho Del Zocalo though.

So what does that leave? Grizzly Peak Airfield? Ok cool, they planted trees and the station wagon is cool. So basically out of millions of dollars spent this decade they managed to create almost nothing that feels like... Disneyland. We got Tropical Hideaway and maybe Fantasyland Faire depending on who you ask and what mood I’m in.

So obviously the huge hole in my argument is the Anamoly that is RSR/ Cars Land. Gone on record many times saying it’s probably my third favorite land at DCA but it and it’s signature attraction are obviously quality even if I don’t spend a whole lot of time there. You can make the argument however that RSR doesnt quite have that that special X factor that most of the beloved Disneyland attractions have but I guess that’s Ok as it’s not in Disneyland and still has a special place at the resort.

It appears that Disney only has two or three types of attractions they can give us now. Irreverent , Princess / cookie cutter book report rides... and Star Wars. There is no room for the mysterious, weird or scary.
I’m disappointed you didn’t include the Hungry Bear sign and Splash Mountain vending cart “The Snackin’ Place” on your good list, and I’m furious you didn’t put include the Dumbo hedge on your bad list. 😡
 

mickEblu

Well-Known Member
Original Poster
I’m disappointed you didn’t include the Hungry Bear sign and Splash Mountain vending cart “The Snackin’ Place” on your good list, and I’m furious you didn’t put include the Dumbo hedge on your bad list. 😡


I’ll admit I forgot about the dumbo hedge and the snackin place. Did think of the Hungry Bear sign but thought that I’ve already milked that one to death.
 

PostScott

Well-Known Member
I remember the figures widely thrown around on the Internet for Cars Land was $600 Million in 2012, with about half that going towards the Radiator Springs Racers ride.

If Cars Land was $600 Million in 2010-2012, then I'm sure Star Wars Land was at least that in 2017-2019. Heck, if you were to sit down and do some Googling and add this up, it might all be over the 1.5 Billion mark heading towards 2 Billion.

But I hate math and I'm supposed to be taking my Disco nap before tonight's dinner party so I can be a gracious host who looks at least 10 years younger than I am, so I can't do that math right now.
If I remember correctly, (I could be totally wrong) but GE way surpassed its budget and each land, both the DHS and DL one, cost 1 billion each.
 

truecoat

Well-Known Member
Hello, welcome to the Disneyland forum! :)

I believe @mickEblu is here like the rest of us, because he likes Disneyland and its long history and enjoys talking about it. Just look at his avatar; it's a clip of the first drop on Pirates taken from the 1967 episode of Wonderful World of Color titled "From Pirates of the Caribbean to the World of Tomorrow", and if that's not a cool way to announce your Disneyland street cred than I don't know what is.

I would also have to agree with his assessment of the recent smaller projects added to Disneyland that still have an element of that classic Walt charm. From most charming to not quite as charming, I would rank that list;

  1. Fantasyland Faire (a super cute way to extend the land, and extend its 1983 remake very nicely)
  2. Cars Land (it's big and bold, but the details were never overlooked and it's amazing what you can find there)
  3. Grizzly Peak Airfield (setting it circa 1961 was a surprising move, but it really works! That 1960 Studebaker is brilliant)

I’d also add the altered train route but that’s just me.
 

waltography

Well-Known Member
I want to go back to 2012 when Court of Angels was still open, DCA was in the midst of a revival, and there was still hope they'd make an actual lobby for Hyperion in their ever-elusive Phase 2.

I largely agree with this, but also I find different ways to enjoy the new additions; they're not charming in the kind of way Disneyland excels at, but they're also not terrible. Except Pixar Pier. Save for the Lamplight Lounge and the Promenade, that entire pier can just go.
 

Brer Panther

Well-Known Member
the films started to lack that charm they were known for.
I think Ralph Breaks the Internet is Disney's lowest point from a movie standpoint yet. At least Chicken Little wasn't an advertisement for the franchises that make Disney the most money with painfully unfunny "jokes" swiped from Buzzfeed articles.
 

Register on WDWMAGIC. This sidebar will go away, and you'll see fewer ads.

Top Bottom