• Welcome to the WDWMAGIC.COM Forums!
    Please take a look around, and feel free to sign up and join the community.You can use your Twitter or Facebook account to sign up, or register directly.

Coronavirus and Walt Disney World general discussion

MaryJaneP

Well-Known Member
Vaccines help your body fight (successfully, thank God) Covid 19. It may be premature to say the war on Covid is over and that the war has been won. This country has not yet reached the percentages previously targeted. The entire planet has even worse percentages. There was a report that the world-wide percentage is the 0.4%. Freedom from wearing masks is a great incentive and a wonderful accomplishment. Yay. May all of the international contacts in WDW be more of the former and less of the latter.
 

GoofGoof

Premium Member
Someone posted in the last 100 pages with exactly that complaint, that a 3 year old that was asleep was asked to fix a max covering the nose.

Fine, there's some very small percentage that are. So, again, if that's the assumption, and everyone is assumed to be in a trial. We're back at the slightly small nuance of "people don't like to lie, and this technically makes them lie". That's kind of a crappy rule.

Which really, back to the other point I made. If you're not doing any mitigations including distance while unvaccinated people eat. What's the point to the rest of the rules at all?

So, if there's no point to the rule and they're not going to enforce it beyond hoping people feel guilty, it's hardly a rule at all. Just come out say "We're open, pandemic over!". For people that accept the current levels as good enough, that's 100% true.
They are pointing to the CDC guidance and saying we are following this. If the CDC drops mask recommendations for everyone then I think they move to that. It’s part CYA and part legal liability and a little bit of safety theater.

As a parent of an 11 year old it does create a dilemma for me if this rule is till in place when I go. If I let my kid not wear a mask and knowingly break the rules then I’m teaching him it’s Ok to lie and the rules don’t apply to him. If I make him wear a mask then I have to hear him complain that no other kids are wearing them.
 

mmascari

Well-Known Member
As a parent of an 11 year old it does create a dilemma for me if this rule is till in place when I go. If I let my kid not wear a mask and knowingly break the rules then I’m teaching him it’s Ok to lie and the rules don’t apply to him. If I make him wear a mask then I have to hear him complain that no other kids are wearing them.
Beyond that, you’ll have to consider the level of spread by August. It’s still 2 months away, could be through the floor. Or we may bottom out before that at some higher level. Today’s crystal ball is a coin flip.

I hope we’re down through the floor and it’s an easy decision for you.
 
Last edited:

GoofGoof

Premium Member
Beyond that, you’ll have to consider the level of spread by August. It’s still 2 months away, could be through the floor. Or we may bottom out before that at some higher level. Today’s crystal ball is a coin flip.

I hope we’re down through the floor and it’s an easy decision for you.
Yeah, I’m assuming cases will be way down by then. I am very glad we will have some time still.
 

Chi84

Premium Member
That would do awesome things for high risk kids like mine. /s
Oh I’m pretty sure they would only recommend dropping masks for kids who aren’t high risk. I think when the risk is low enough, the CDC will shift from recommending masks for everyone to recommending them for those who are high risk. Unfortunately COVID may be around for awhile.
 

Angel Ariel

Well-Known Member
Oh I’m pretty sure they would only recommend dropping masks for kids who aren’t high risk. I think when the risk is low enough, the CDC will shift from recommending masks for everyone to recommending them for those who are high risk. Unfortunately COVID may be around for awhile.
Yes, but as has been understood, masks more protect others from you than they protect you from others (save n95 masks). When both parties are masked, then both are protected. Those with vaccines can still catch and spread COVID, though at lesser amounts. Until the younger age levels have the opportunity to be vaccinated, such measures will force high risk families into isolation that would not be necessary if the masking remained in effect. that isolation has had such a negative impact on these kids as it is. That should be more important than the “inconvenience” of a mask.
 

Chi84

Premium Member
Yes, but as has been understood, masks more protect others from you than they protect you from others (save n95 masks). When both parties are masked, then both are protected. Those with vaccines can still catch and spread COVID, though at lesser amounts. Until the younger age levels have the opportunity to be vaccinated, such measures will force high risk families into isolation that would not be necessary if the masking remained in effect. that isolation has had such a negative impact on these kids as it is. That should be more important than the “inconvenience” of a mask.
The CDC will assess all the data it has compiled in deciding whether to revise their guidelines. I’m sure they’ll take the points you made into consideration.
 

Angel Ariel

Well-Known Member
The CDC will assess all the data it has compiled in deciding whether to revise their guidelines. I’m sure they’ll take the points you made into consideration.
I’ll be honest, I think society as a whole at this point is fine with the comparatively small high risk population being forced into further isolation, so I don’t hold out much hope from the CDC. I’ve had other adults basically tell me my kid’s mental health doesn’t matter as much as theirs.

The pandemic has certainly impacted my faith in humanity in many ways.
 

Chi84

Premium Member
I’ll be honest, I think society as a whole at this point is fine with the comparatively small high risk population being forced into further isolation, so I don’t hold out much hope from the CDC. I’ve had other adults basically tell me my kid’s mental health doesn’t matter as much as theirs.

The pandemic has certainly impacted my faith in humanity in many ways.
Public policy necessarily has to be based on what is best for society as a whole. I’m not sure you can blame humanity for the fact that some individuals will be impacted more than others. That’s almost always the case, but it’s small consolation when you are the one who is being adversely affected. It’s hard to believe other adults would be so callous as to say that to you.
 

Angel Ariel

Well-Known Member
It’s hard to believe other adults would be so callous as to say that to you.
I’ve also seen adults blame students with disabilities for their neurotypical children not being allowed to go back into school (when students with significant disabilities were allowed back in small cohorts before the general population). As recently as April 2021.

People really can suck.
 

Dreaming of Disney World

Well-Known Member
Yes, but as has been understood, masks more protect others from you than they protect you from others (save n95 masks). When both parties are masked, then both are protected. Those with vaccines can still catch and spread COVID, though at lesser amounts. Until the younger age levels have the opportunity to be vaccinated, such measures will force high risk families into isolation that would not be necessary if the masking remained in effect. that isolation has had such a negative impact on these kids as it is. That should be more important than the “inconvenience” of a mask.
Unfortunately a lot of people still don't understand that. :(
 

ParentsOf4

Well-Known Member
For those that are vaccinated, sure. But a huge portion of WDW’s target audience - ie kids - don’t have access to that yet. And there are concerns about rising hospitalization rates for kids:

As others have suggested, perhaps WDW is not a place for anyone who is not vaccinated, including anyone under the age of 12?

No one HAS to go to WDW this year.

You have options. Vacation somewhere less crowded in 2021, and wait until your children are vaccinated before heading to WDW.

You’re the parent. You’re the adult. Make the adult decision and put your children’s health first. That WDW vacation can wait until next year.
 

Bullseye1967

Is that who I am?
Premium Member
Yes, but as has been understood, masks more protect others from you than they protect you from others (save n95 masks). When both parties are masked, then both are protected. Those with vaccines can still catch and spread COVID, though at lesser amounts. Until the younger age levels have the opportunity to be vaccinated, such measures will force high risk families into isolation that would not be necessary if the masking remained in effect. that isolation has had such a negative impact on these kids as it is. That should be more important than the “inconvenience” of a mask.
OK I'll bite on the elephant in the room. There is a whole lot of wiggle room in between "isolating" and bringing your "high risk" children to a theme park with thousands of people. Unless your kids are terminal and their dying wish is to do to Disney, then maybe the solution is that you should not be going in the first place even if everyone was wearing a mask. If we were to calculate the chances of them catching COVID 19 in a very crowded theme park with everyone is wearing a mask and somewhere like a state park where there is plenty of room for physical distancing, a theme park may not be where you should be going as a responsible parent of "high risk" children. You don't have to stay home, but you also don't have to take a vacation in one of the most densely populated places in the US.
 

Heppenheimer

Well-Known Member
OK I'll bite on the elephant in the room. There is a whole lot of wiggle room in between "isolating" and bringing your "high risk" children to a theme park with thousands of people. Unless your kids are terminal and their dying wish is to do to Disney, then maybe the solution is that you should not be going in the first place even if everyone was wearing a mask. If we were to calculate the chances of them catching COVID 19 in a very crowded theme park with everyone is wearing a mask and somewhere like a state park where there is plenty of room for physical distancing, a theme park may not be where you should be going as a responsible parent of "high risk" children. You don't have to stay home, but you also don't have to take a vacation in one of the most densely populated places in the US.
Liked this response while on vacation in Maine with my family, including unvaccinated toddler.
 

Jrb1979

Well-Known Member
OK I'll bite on the elephant in the room. There is a whole lot of wiggle room in between "isolating" and bringing your "high risk" children to a theme park with thousands of people. Unless your kids are terminal and their dying wish is to do to Disney, then maybe the solution is that you should not be going in the first place even if everyone was wearing a mask. If we were to calculate the chances of them catching COVID 19 in a very crowded theme park with everyone is wearing a mask and somewhere like a state park where there is plenty of room for physical distancing, a theme park may not be where you should be going as a responsible parent of "high risk" children. You don't have to stay home, but you also don't have to take a vacation in one of the most densely populated places in the US.
Or here's a better idea. How about enforce the actual guidelines set out by the CDC and those not vaccinated have to wear a mask. Since that's too much work, it's no masks for everyone.
 

Chi84

Premium Member
Or here's a better idea. How about enforce the actual guidelines set out by the CDC and those not vaccinated have to wear a mask. Since that's too much work, it's no masks for everyone.
As long as there's no government mandate requiring Disney to enforce CDC guidelines, I think it's up to them. They can state the CDC guidelines and their "expectation" that the guidelines will be followed without asking people for vaccination status, which they have no intention of doing. Nor are they going to hassle kids under 12; hopefully the CDC will change its guidelines for that group soon so it won't be an issue.

Disney is running a theme park and it knows its audience. We were there in early May, and I doubt the people visiting at that time were particularly fearful of getting COVID. From what we saw, people were respectful and almost all (except very young children) followed mask rules, but I didn't get the feeling that anyone was happy to be wearing masks or concerned about others following mitigation measures. I could be wrong, but I think the people who are most strongly in favor of WDW strictly enforcing mask rules aren't going there now. They are probably making the decision to stay away until they're more comfortable being in crowds. As long as Disney isn't violating any laws, it has the right to make its own business decisions on how to handle the CDC guidelines.
 

ParentsOf4

Well-Known Member
Or here's a better idea. How about enforce the actual guidelines set out by the CDC and those not vaccinated have to wear a mask. Since that's too much work, it's no masks for everyone.
It's not just masks.

After more than a year of either being closed or having severely limited attendance, corporate Disney wants to start making money again. They are eliminating social distancing, upping park capacity, and packing people in.

Remember, Disney has been perhaps the most cautious park when it comes to Guest safety. Disney has been a "good" corporate neighbor. So don't go complaining that Disney needs to do more - they've already done more than most.

No, really the best option is don't go to WDW right now if you are not vaccinated. Take the family camping. Take a beach vacation. Visit some national parks. There's plenty for a family to safely do this summer other than visit a crowded theme park.

WDW will be there next year and everyone will be eligible for vaccination by then.
 

Register on WDWMAGIC. This sidebar will go away, and you'll see fewer ads.

Top Bottom