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Coronavirus and Walt Disney World general discussion

danlb_2000

Well-Known Member
That is why masks and social distancing is being left in place for awhile after everyone is vaccinated.

I actually removed this response because I think we are on the same page. As you say it is not likely to completely "stop" any time soon but it will likely slow it significantly so precautions will be needed longer then most people probably hope.
 

Jrb1979

Well-Known Member
I actually removed this response because I think we are on the same page. As you say it is not likely to completely "stop" any time soon but it will likely slow it significantly so precautions will be needed longer then most people probably hope.
Exactly. I am hopeful with the vaccine we will have life back soon. I don't think by summer everything gets dropped. My feeling is masks and social distancing stay for the rest of the year.
 

DisneyFan32

Active Member
In the Parks
Yes
Exactly. I am hopeful with the vaccine we will have life back soon. I don't think by summer everything gets dropped. My feeling is masks and social distancing stay for the rest of the year.
Let's see masks and social distancing will may be gone by summer if the vaccine roll up goes faster.
 

techgeek

Well-Known Member
There are two parts to the return to normal, on is the state of the virus, but there is also the money issue. There may be things that could safely return, but do not immediately return to save money until Disney's cash flow improves.

... and even if money wasn’t an issue, modern Disney is not a company that can do anything fast.
 

DisneyFan32

Active Member
In the Parks
Yes
Is US will speed up vaccine ramping so there will be back to normal sooner maybe summer than fall. How pandemic will end in 2022/2023 than seven years? I'm scared.
 

MaryJaneP

Well-Known Member
Some restrictions will be gone by fall here. They expect masks and social distancing to still be around for a little after people are vaccinated. It's cause the vaccine doesn't get rid of Covid or stop the spread. It just makes symptoms less severe. I personally don't mind wearing masks or being physically distant from others. I like my space.
If vaccine doesn't get rid of Covid or stop spread, will testing numbers and new case numbers remain elevated, assuming aggressive testing remains?
 

danlb_2000

Well-Known Member
Is US will speed up vaccine ramping so there will be back to normal sooner maybe summer than fall. How pandemic will end in 2022/2023 than seven years? I'm scared.
The seven year number that is floating around comes from looking how long it would take to vaccinate enough people world wide to reach herd immunity at the current rate. It does not take into account that the rate of vaccinations will continue to increase. It is also looking globally. Developed countries like the us will get it under control long before less developed countries.
 

dreday3

Well-Known Member
If vaccine doesn't get rid of Covid or stop spread, will testing numbers and new case numbers remain elevated, assuming aggressive testing remains?

I'm sure case numbers will go down, but....

After vaccines are readily available to all and if the vaccine(s) prevent severe disease, hospitalizations and death (which is kind of the point of the vaccine) - why would you still be concerned with positive cases if you've been vaccinated?

I'm hoping we get to a point where hospitalizations and deaths drop off so dramatically (and it's sustained) that we don't need the daily count of Covid cases reported every single day....
 

dreday3

Well-Known Member
An update to my second Moderna dose - I can't lie, I did not feel well for about 2 days. I had a fever for both days, aches and chills. Today is Saturday, got it on Wednesday and I am finally feeling better. I was one of those people who got "covid arm" - rash at injection site about 10 days later - and am expecting it again this time, even though they had me get in opposite arm.

All that and I still recommend getting the vaccine because it wasn't that bad and I would imagine much preferred over Covid!
 
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GoofGoof

Premium Member
Is this 22 + 38, or 22 + 16 (38)?

Curious as I haven't been keeping up with numbers outside the US for a while.
38% have at least 1 shot and 22% have both. Bloomberg has the international tracker towards the bottom of their page. Despite our complaints of the slower pace of the US rollout it’s really just our friends across the pond in the UK and a few small nations that are ahead of us. Israel is definitely the front runner right now but only has a population of 5M so a less logistically challenging rollout. Still should be a good insight into what’s to come. They should be able to prove out whether the vaccinated are still able to spread the virus and also what level of immunity is needed to reach a level of herd immunity. Exciting times for sure.

 

GoofGoof

Premium Member
I view it as being realistic rather than throwing in the towel, particularly in light of what most scientists seem to be saying. I live in the US and don’t expect things to be back to normal by the summer, much as I hope they will be.
I don’t expect back to normal by the summer either (and never said that I did), but there’s a big grey area between back to total normal and no different than last summer (which is what the poster I responded to said).

I do expect this summer to be better than last summer. If that’s not the case the vaccine rollout was either horribly botched or something else unanticipated happened. Even if we only had 100M Americans fully vaccinated by July 1 (which is actually less than if we continue at today’s pace and assumes nobody gets JnJ or any other vaccine) that should still have some pretty big impacts on cases and community spread even without full herd immunity. That’s roughly a third of the population immune through vaccination or infection. Not enough for herd immunity but it should reduce spread.

I also still think it’s throwing in the towel on the year if you are resigned that the majority of the population won’t be vaccinated by the end of the year (as the other poster also said about Canada). It’s way too soon to give up on vaccine supply 11 months from now. As more vaccines come online and manufacturing ramps up I would be surprised if Canada doesn’t have enough doses for anyone who wants one by the Fall.
 

GoofGoof

Premium Member
I know Hawaii is an island and so uniquely able to lock its borders down, but I think this small case study shows that the economic benefit of more restrictions and as a result less cases is a net positive for the state compared to other states. I’ve tried to make the argument from the beginning that the best thing for unemployment wasn’t removing restrictions it was lowering cases. Hawaii has proven that out. It’s a limited case study with a unique geographic advantage but it does bring up the interesting question of how much better off could the whole country’s economy be if we did a better job containing case spread.

 

JoeCamel

Well-Known Member
I'm sure case numbers will go down, but....

After vaccines are readily available to all and if the vaccine(s) prevent severe disease, hospitalizations and death (which is kind of the point of the vaccine) - why would you still be concerned with positive cases if you've been vaccinated?

I'm hoping we get to a point where hospitalizations and deaths drop off so dramatically (and it's sustained) that we don't need the daily count of Covid cases reported every single day....
No one knows how long the immunity gained through the vaccine lasts. I agree that we can get to manageable levels of spread but we haven't yet
 

dreday3

Well-Known Member
No one knows how long the immunity gained through the vaccine lasts. I agree that we can get to manageable levels of spread but we haven't yet

I'm sure we'll need a shot (booster I suppose) every year. I know there was talk maybe it wouldn't be as soon, maybe every two years, but I'm not that optimistic.
 

Familyof5

Member
For starters, I'm a hypochondriac who lives and works in NYC. Already, we're off to a good start (and I fit the stereotype). Even with every precaution, even with assurances in print that there are no confirmed cases in the city, I'm getting a little worse for wear with each passing day. This is also crimping my desire to travel. Especially to metropolitan areas (which strike me as obviously a little more prone to spreading the virus). And if I had a trip coming up for Disney, I wonder if I'd think twice. In NYC alone, Chinatown is suffering, taxis aren't picking up asian passengers/passengers aren't stepping into taxis with asian drivers, restaurants are beginning to struggle, tourism is suffering due to the lack of international visitors.

Life is a roll of the dice. Anything can happen. Violence, accidents, transportation mishaps. But I'm wondering when (not if) the coronavirus is going to hit to the point that it affects travel and, more specifically, WDW. Does Disney have plans in place beyond limiting hours and laying off performers?
Get your vaccinations; then go.
 

Disney Analyst

Well-Known Member
Canada’s vaccine rollout has been rough, but pretty much due to the fact we don’t manufacture any of our own. We are relying on others, and that’s the frustration. I truly hope Moderna and Pfizer can ramp up soon and get us back on track, being shorted / getting no vaccine is no fun.
 

GoofGoof

Premium Member
I'm sure we'll need a shot (booster I suppose) every year. I know there was talk maybe it wouldn't be as soon, maybe every two years, but I'm not that optimistic.
It’s possible we will need future vaccinations or boosters.

It’s also possible that Covid becomes endemic (always around) but it also becomes as harmless as other corona viruses. The theory is that once infected (or vaccinated) we have a level of immunity which may fade over time but a future infection would act almost like a booster shot and reactivate our immune response. So while Covid will circulate indefinitely it won’t be a problem. This was all based on a study by researchers at Emory and Penn State. The theory is based off of studies of other Coronaviruses that are endemic. We all get infected with them as small children when they cause nothing more than cold like symptoms and then our immune response going forward is triggered making the virus nothing more than a common cold. The reason Covid was such an issue is no adults had immunity to it unlike the other Corona viruses that we all get exposed to as children. Makes some sense considering kids seem to be less impacted by this virus too. Of course with a good vaccine kids going forward could just be vaccinated and develop immunity without ever having any symptoms. So it’s possible kids get a Covid shot as part of normal childhood vaccinations.

I had read somewhere that a theory is the other Corona viruses may have started as a pandemic hundreds of years ago and then became endemic common cold viruses in a similar manner. We just didn’t have the technology back then to identify them and understand what was happening.

 

DCBaker

Premium Member
Numbers are out - there were 142 new reported deaths, along with 3 Non-Florida Resident deaths.

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