• Welcome to the WDWMAGIC.COM Forums!
    Please take a look around, and feel free to sign up and join the community.You can use your Twitter or Facebook account to sign up, or register directly.

Cast Member Drinking Water From Decorative Fountains?

lazyboy97o

Well-Known Member
All so true. You don't think of any of that stuff as a kid growing up and going to the public pool, but now just thinking about it makes me cringe. It's not like hotel pools, public pools, or Disney parks ever circulate fresh water in or at least not often. I'm not an expert on public pool water circulation, but I'm guessing you're also swimming in pee from kids who were there last week, the week before, and the week before that. So gross if you think about it. 🤢 The pool might be filled with more pee than water. 🤣🤢
The water doesn’t just get poured into the pool and left there. New water has to be added just to counteract evaporation and splashing. It is at the least circulated and filtered, but a public system is also probably going to do more automatic treating. The water quality is also monitored.
 

MickeyLuv'r

Well-Known Member
Yes it does but on the opposite end " it is all in the water " phrase regarding NYC /NJ water. That is what the NYC /NJ bread, pizza and bagels taste the best!
I'm WAY oversimplifying, but the Florida aquifer is actually considered to be VERY good water. It is one of the world's most productive aquifers. Though I quoted your post, the following post is really aimed towards multiple posts in this thread.

More or less, Florida sits on a very large bed of limestone. The limestone helps to filter the water. Limestone = calcium. Calcium is a good addition to water for a number of reasons. Florida water also tends to be high in sulfur, and that impacts the taste.

Hard water= more dissolved minerals. Soft water = fewer dissolved minerals (especially calcium)

We tend to think soft water tastes better, but only to a point. Humans tend to think pure water tastes terrible.

NYC water comes from upstate New York. Some of it travels more than 125 miles. The Catskill Aqueduct supplies 40% of NYC water is very soft, which means there are few minerals in it.

There is also the matter of alkalinity/acidity in water.

Yeast- the stuff that makes pizza/bread/bagel dough rise is alive. The dissolved minerals and pH of the water we use to make yeast breads has a big impact on how well the yeast can grow and how much fermentation takes place. They also limit the ability of gluten to absorb water. gluten is the protein found in yeast.

One more important component of drinking water is chlorine and chloramine. They are added to municipal water to kill bacteria, but have a significant impact on the taste. Both are toxic to fish.

In short, when we want to make bread, soft water tends to = better taste.

Also, going back to my earlier post....The biproduct of yeast digestion is alcohol and CO2. Or, we might say alcohol and CO2 = yeast poop. We would not have beer or wine or bread if not for yeast digestion.

*And if any of you like shiny candy (jelly beans, candy corn, shiny chocolates, M&M's, etc.) you might want to research the origin of confectioner's glaze! Also, a very similar glaze is used to coat many pill/tablet medications: time release capsules, extended release capsules, many vitamins. It is the coating that keeps the pill from immediately dissolving in your mouth. Shellac is also used in many cosmetics, hairspray, inks, and more.

*For more fun, look up urea, and all the products that contain urea! Oh, you will never look at any lotions, creams, or hair care products the same as you once did.
 

Pepper's Ghost

Well-Known Member
Well...people also swim in natural bodies of water, like ponds, lakes, seas, and oceans. We also eat produce, rice, corn, chocolate, and other natural products. We are a part of, and completely dependent on the entire ecosystem that surrounds us. To anyone that has never taken biology, I highly recommend it as a very useful subject to study!

Every corn field is home to a wide range of creatures: ants, mice, birds, moths, fungi, bacteria.

Betta, are commonly sold as house pets. Wild bettas fish live in shallow bodies of water: rice paddies. There are over 1,000 species of killifish. Many killifish are adapted to living in seasonal ponds. They live one season, and their eggs dry before they hatch. Again, think rice paddies.

On top of that, our skin is -more or less- an ecosystem of tiny critters. On top of that, our gut is a little ecosystem called a microbiome.

We NEED our gut bacteria! We would not be alive if not for our gut bacteria. So um, well...

Every day all day we are surrounded by and dependent on atoms that have been previously processed by other critters.

The Circle of Life!

Not sure if you are swimming in pool water that has weeks and weeks of peed in water, but certainly you and I have been in pools in and out of WDW that have been peed in. Hell, you have probably even swam in a pool that have had a baby or two go number two in their swim diaper while in the pool. The weird thing is a pool will never be shut down for pee in the pool because it goes undetected, but I have been to resorts(not WDW) that have shut the pool down when a poo poo was noticed in the pool. The pool was actually closed the entire time I was there as they drained and cleaned the pool. I was quite shocked.
I love this gif, and you both collectively made me...
puke.gif

Yep, I know all that stuff, excluding the nuances of biology which I took 32 years ago. (Man, has it really been that long.) I'm aware of all the lovely minuscule and microscopic organisms we live with each day and actually need to survive. Doesn't make thinking about that stuff any less gag-worthy. 😁
 

Pepper's Ghost

Well-Known Member
I'm WAY oversimplifying, but the Florida aquifer is actually considered to be VERY good water. It is one of the world's most productive aquifers. Though I quoted your post, the following post is really aimed towards multiple posts in this thread.

More or less, Florida sits on a very large bed of limestone. The limestone helps to filter the water. Limestone = calcium. Calcium is a good addition to water for a number of reasons. Florida water also tends to be high in sulfur, and that impacts the taste.

Hard water= more dissolved minerals. Soft water = fewer dissolved minerals (especially calcium)

We tend to think soft water tastes better, but only to a point. Humans tend to think pure water tastes terrible.

NYC water comes from upstate New York. Some of it travels more than 125 miles. The Catskill Aqueduct supplies 40% of NYC water is very soft, which means there are few minerals in it.

There is also the matter of alkalinity/acidity in water.

Yeast- the stuff that makes pizza/bread/bagel dough rise is alive. The dissolved minerals and pH of the water we use to make yeast breads has a big impact on how well the yeast can grow and how much fermentation takes place. They also limit the ability of gluten to absorb water. gluten is the protein found in yeast.

One more important component of drinking water is chlorine and chloramine. They are added to municipal water to kill bacteria, but have a significant impact on the taste. Both are toxic to fish.

In short, when we want to make bread, soft water tends to = better taste.

Also, going back to my earlier post....The biproduct of yeast digestion is alcohol and CO2. Or, we might say alcohol and CO2 = yeast poop. We would not have beer or wine or bread if not for yeast digestion.

*And if any of you like shiny candy (jelly beans, candy corn, shiny chocolates, M&M's, etc.) you might want to research the origin of confectioner's glaze! Also, a very similar glaze is used to coat many pill/tablet medications: time release capsules, extended release capsules, many vitamins. It is the coating that keeps the pill from immediately dissolving in your mouth. Shellac is also used in many cosmetics, hairspray, inks, and more.

*For more fun, look up urea, and all the products that contain urea! Oh, you will never look at any lotions, creams, or hair care products the same as you once did.
You obviously know a ton about this stuff, so wondering if you can help me understand. Whenever I travel to either coast the water always seems excessively soft, and slippery. Any particular reason? I prefer hard water just because after you've rinsed off, it doesn't feel like you still have soap on your hands and skin. Soft water is so slippery that it always feel like your hands/skin are still soapy. Why is that?
 

Pepper's Ghost

Well-Known Member
He got banned just for drinking water and going into the wedding venue? Did he do something else or thats it?
I'm guessing it's some kind of detail in his employment agreement. Plus, does Disney really want that kind of coverage on social media, not to mention what if others start doing the same or similar kind of thing, and get really sick. Guess who's gonna get sued looking for a settlement.
 

Drinker Bell

Active Member
In the Parks
No
I love this gif, and you both collectively made me...
View attachment 556622
Yep, I know all that stuff, excluding the nuances of biology which I took 32 years ago. (Man, has it really been that long.) I'm aware of all the lovely minuscule and microscopic organisms we live with each day and actually need to survive. Doesn't make thinking about that stuff any less gag-worthy. 😁
I agree it is not very pleasant to think about, but on the 90+ almost 100 degree humid days you somehow completely blank on those things and take that dip in the pool to get refreshed anyway. Many adult pools have so much chlorine in them that it kills that stuff anyway. As for the baby pools, I don't know about that.
 

Squishy

Well-Known Member
He was specifically trespassed for going into the wedding venue when it wasn't open.
What stops guests from going there? Usually its not roped off and judging by the video the door was nicely unlocked. Really don't understand how Disney is blaming it on him.
 

uncle jimmy

Premium Member
What stops guests from going there? Usually its not roped off and judging by the video the door was nicely unlocked. Really don't understand how Disney is blaming it on him.
So I took it as they handled what he did and being an a restricted area as a cast member and not as a guest.
The water isn't just the issue, its the places he was that he wasn't suppose to be and taking a video in those areas and then sharing it.
 

Squishy

Well-Known Member
So I took it as they handled what he did and being an a restricted area as a cast member and not as a guest.
The water isn't just the issue, its the places he was that he wasn't suppose to be and taking a video in those areas and then sharing it.
I guess that might be it. But it's also not like the area hasn't been shared before. Pretty sure there are many photos of the venue along with Disney having a tv show around it.
 

Goofyernmost

Well-Known Member
And all this talk about peeing in pools and any other public chances of exposure you happen to come upon is the very reason why we as part of the human race have a thing called an immune system. To be fair immune systems do not protect you from, oh, lets say, a virus until you have been exposed to it directly or via vaccine, but almost every normal germ that a human body can created on it's own has, with exposure, built up immunities to many, many things, so as the old song says, don't worry, be happy. At the same time be careful but don't go crazy about it.
 

Goofyernmost

Well-Known Member
I guess that might be it. But it's also not like the area hasn't been shared before. Pretty sure there are many photos of the venue along with Disney having a tv show around it.
I know that WDW is a big public place, but downsize it to our own homes. Would you be upset if someone you didn't know walked into your home and took pictures and later posted them online to strangers. He asked why did you leave the door open, well, duh, because it wasn't shut and isn't required. What is required is that one have enough sense of responsibility then to go to a place without an invitation as if it was free for him to just do whatever the hell he wanted too.
 

unmitigated disaster

Well-Known Member
Not sure if you are swimming in pool water that has weeks and weeks of peed in water, but certainly you and I have been in pools in and out of WDW that have been peed in. Hell, you have probably even swam in a pool that have had a baby or two go number two in their swim diaper while in the pool. The weird thing is a pool will never be shut down for pee in the pool because it goes undetected, but I have been to resorts(not WDW) that have shut the pool down when a poo poo was noticed in the pool. The pool was actually closed the entire time I was there as they drained and cleaned the pool. I was quite shocked.
We've had to drain and clean our pools where I work a couple of times because of this; it's a health code mandate from my understanding.

And you certainly can get ill from water! Everything from flesh eating bacteria to typhoid to ingesting heavy metals.
 
Last edited:

Goofyernmost

Well-Known Member
We've had to drain and clean our pools where I work a couple of times because of this; it's a health code mandate from my understanding.

And you certainly can get ill from water! Everything from flesh eating bacteria to typhoid to ingesting heavy metals.
However, you can get quite dead without water. Just a choice of fears I guess.

I'm a little skeptical about the draining the pools because of "pee in the water". Feces, yes, but any bacteria in the pee, which is usually not all that much to be worrisome, the chlorine will kill dead. From what I heard, you can even drink urine with little to no problems before it is diluted with thousands of gallons of pool water. As an occasionally consumption the worst result would be that none of your friends or relatives would want to spend any time with you. Almost all of urine is pure water, it's just something that most people would prefer not to experience. I'm on their side on this one.
 

MickeyLuv'r

Well-Known Member
You obviously know a ton about this stuff, so wondering if you can help me understand. Whenever I travel to either coast the water always seems excessively soft, and slippery. Any particular reason? I prefer hard water just because after you've rinsed off, it doesn't feel like you still have soap on your hands and skin. Soft water is so slippery that it always feel like your hands/skin are still soapy. Why is that?
I'm not sure I can completely answer your question. I think perhaps it is partly a matter of preference, and just what each of us considers to be "normal." Soft water = more suds. In addition to hardness, there's also pH, and that has an impact on how our skin reacts.

Water is complicated. Some localities have municipal water, some folks get water from a personal well. On top of that, many houses have in-home water filtration systems or water treatment devices.

Much of what is in say, well water has to do with what minerals/chemicals are dissolved in the water, and those levels fluctuate (every times it rains).

My knowledge of water comes from experience with aquariums. In short, most tap water is toxic to fish. Fish can't tolerate chemicals to the same level human can tolerate them.

For aquariums, the best option is to initially add highly filtered water. Another so-so option is to use bottled distilled water but that us usually shipped in plastic bottles. Plastic = chemicals that probably aren't good for any creature. One can also treat (tap) water with chemicals, but, that's adding more chemicals. IMO, fish are a little like canaries in the coal mine. Water that kills fish? Might be okay for us?

Pool water is not only treated with chemicals, it is also filtered. I don't know much about pool filters, but aquarium filters have 3 levels of filtration: 1. filter big particles with a medium (fiber or sand). 2. filter chemicals by pumping water through charcoal. Charcoal removes many chemicals. Many refrigerator water filter cartridges use carbon. And #3. bacterial filtration.

In an aquarium, the very best, most natural way to keep an aquarium clean is to create as much of a complete ecosystem as possible! As an aquarium becomes established, bacteria and other microorganisms multiply. They are the real powerhouses! Ideally, every aquarium, pond and natural body of water has a balance of fish, plants and microorganisms. Over time, I found the less I changed the water or disrupted the natural system, the better.

That goes against what most pet stores tell newbies, because water changes = buying stuff (to fix problems).

Some aquarium maintenance can't be avoided. For example, the giant aquarium in Epcot looks awful, and is DESPERATELY in need of a massive cleaning/restoration. There is way too much fake plastic in there. I don't think it has any live coral at all. The plastic stuff long ago faded, and has been covered with algae for years. That giant aquarium is ugly and dingy!

If you want to see a neat little product, look up something called an Eco-Sphere pod. They are completely self-sustaining for years, as long as the shrimp live. (The brand name "Eco-Sphere", not the generic eccosphere or anything on Etsy.)
 

MickeyLuv'r

Well-Known Member
However, you can get quite dead without water. Just a choice of fears I guess.

I'm a little skeptical about the draining the pools because of "pee in the water". Feces, yes, but any bacteria in the pee, which is usually not all that much to be worrisome, the chlorine will kill dead. From what I heard, you can even drink urine with little to no problems before it is diluted with thousands of gallons of pool water. As an occasionally consumption the worst result would be that none of your friends or relatives would want to spend any time with you. Almost all of urine is pure water, it's just something that most people would prefer not to experience. I'm on their side on this one.
To be gross, pure urine is sterile. Urine is the toxic stuff our kidneys are trying to remove from our bodies. When we consider drinking urine, the most problematic component of urine is - usually - the ammonia.

Except humans often have urinary tract infections, so urine can be contaminated with bacteria as it exits our body.

Generally, pool water should mostly be free of bacteria. It should mostly be okay to drink in small quantities. When it comes to drinking larger quantities though, the real concern is the amount of chemicals you are consuming. Among the chemicals added to pools are chlorine and bromide. They are there to kill bacteria. We can tolerate both in small quantities, but not large quantities. Municipalities often add small amounts of chlorine (or the similar chloramine) to our drinking water. Some pools also use salt. Some salt is good for us, but drinking sea water levels of salt is not okay for us.

Also, a pool that has not been properly maintained can become quickly contaminated.

One tool that works to make most natural water safe to drink is a simple filtering device called a Life Straw.

If this guy drank water during pool operating hours, it should mostly have been safe in small quantities. Outside of normal hours though, he may well have been drinking SHOCKED pool water, as in water that had too high concentrations of chemicals. Or water that was temporarily contaminated with too much bacteria, etc.
 

Register on WDWMAGIC. This sidebar will go away, and you'll see fewer ads.

Top Bottom