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News Bobby Mouse needs his cut.. (Price Increase)

Phrubruh

Well-Known Member
Disney just has a full experience. For me it is as much about the sounds, sights, and food as it is the rides.
Believe me it get's old wading through 70k of people and hearing children scream and strollers being rammed into you and waiting in hour long lines for over priced popcorn. To me it was a lot more fun to drive up to San Francisco and hang out in the city for a few days.

The Palace of Fine Arts looks nothing like the tiny Little Mermaid dome at DCA. It's much more grand!

 

nesboy43

Well-Known Member
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Believe me it get's old wading through 70k of people and hearing children scream and strollers being rammed into you and waiting in hour long lines for over priced popcorn. To me it was a lot more fun to drive up to San Francisco and hang out in the city for a few days.

The Palace of Fine Arts looks nothing like the tiny Little Mermaid dome at DCA. It's much more grand!

For me driving in an area like San Francisco or Los Angeles logistically isn't fun. Although I do like trying new food and restaurants and seeing new sites, all the big cities are just too annoying to navigate in whether it be traffic or parking or overcrowding.

I go through periods of time where I don't want to visit Disney and then after 6 months I'll miss it. I honestly think the parks have not felt crowded to me besides 2017. I usually end up going for the food and scenery so ride times are not my biggest concern. The nice thing is that if someone does want to go on a bunch of rides all they have to do is show up at rope drop, even on the most crowded day and you can do everything before 11.
 

nesboy43

Well-Known Member
So true. Electronic Arts has taken that sort of stance, although worse, and it's finally catching up to them to the tune of millions upon millions of lost capital / sales. It did take years for people to realize the company's Bullhunky. I like to think that this is what happens when corporate puts agendas & the almighty dollar over quality and creativity, originality (SWL excluded but it still carries a major IP).

I used to think Maxis and Dice were too amazing to fail. LOL
With Disney the thing that will keep them popular is their customer service. They honestly have the nicest employees and best customer service of any place you can go. This is also true for Disney World. The customer service and cleanliness make the parks stand out from their competition.
 

Phrubruh

Well-Known Member
With Disney the thing that will keep them popular is their customer service. They honestly have the nicest employees and best customer service of any place you can go. This is also true for Disney World. The customer service and cleanliness make the parks stand out from their competition.
You do have a point about customer service in the theme park industry. Unlike your typical Six Flags or Cedar Fair employee, Disney cast members are typically faster, efficient, knowledgeable and friendly while doing their jobs. They seem happy too. You don't have to wait long to get loaded and dispatched at Space Mountain. Any other non-Disney park, you wait while the employees visit or mess around. However there is that dark side to Disney cast members that know there is a waiting list of people to take over their job as soon as they mess up. Inexperienced front line managers can be terrible to work for. Upper management expect a lot from an understaffed groups of cast members. It's definitely not a pleasant job but they grin and bear it to make your day happy.
 

TP2000

Well-Known Member
This is slightly unrelated, but it's also just funny and terrifying at the same time. And it does show what happens when you have to go the opposite direction on pricing to get overwhelming crowds.

Over the Christmas break this year Six Flags Magic Mountain had a very badly planned "Bring A Friend For FREE!" ticket offer. This was the result. Look at the freeway drone shots later in the video!

 

nesboy43

Well-Known Member
This is slightly unrelated, but it's also just funny and terrifying at the same time. And it does show what happens when you have to go the opposite direction on pricing to get overwhelming crowds.

Over the Christmas break this year Six Flags Magic Mountain had a very badly planned "Bring A Friend For FREE!" ticket offer. This was the result. Look at the freeway drone shots later in the video!

Former Six Flags Parking CM here. I've never seen it this bad. We nearly reached parking lot (including overflow) capacity on one occasion on a random Fright Fest day in October (which set a new record at the time). That day was insane but this is even crazier.

edit: On second watch I am mistaken. We had more cars parked on the October day then, they are not using the second overflow lot across from the parking lot.
 

Phrubruh

Well-Known Member
This is slightly unrelated, but it's also just funny and terrifying at the same time. And it does show what happens when you have to go the opposite direction on pricing to get overwhelming crowds.

Over the Christmas break this year Six Flags Magic Mountain had a very badly planned "Bring A Friend For FREE!" ticket offer. This was the result. Look at the freeway drone shots later in the video!

Typically their bring a friend free is during the weekdays and slower parts of the year. It was stupid to do that that day.
 

Phrubruh

Well-Known Member
Typically their bring a friend free is during the weekdays and slower parts of the year. It was stupid to do that that day.
I was up north at Six Flags Discovery Kingdom on 12/31 where I didn't get the bring a friend free and they closed at 6pm. Operations decided to never open most of the roller coasters that day. There are only so many times you can watch a dolphin show.
 

Travel Junkie

Well-Known Member
Ah, yes... love the LA Times, randomly quoting the 2018 consumer price index of 2.2%, historically very, very low for yet another year. (And now dropping further in '19 with the falling gasoline prices) As if the inflation rate should somehow dictate what a private company charges free consumers for their in-demand product. :rolleyes:

Now you kids all know me, so this is where I pop in with my usual Price Comparison Chart of Random SoCal Entertainment Offerings;

Los Angeles Rams Game, LA Coliseum, Saturday January 12th
End Zone Nosebleed seats - $160 per seat
Visitors Side Mid-Tier 40 Yard Line seats - $560 per seat
Home Side Great Seats - $1,899 to $3,000 per seat
Coliseum Parking - $60 at USC campus surface lots


Los Angeles Philharmonic, Walt Disney Concert Hall, Turangalila Symphony, Saturday, January 19th
Orchestra seats - $164 per seat


Los Angeles Lakers, Staples Center, Sunday January 13th
Behind the net Nosebleed seats - $210 per seat
Midlevel at the Net - $455 per seat
Down Front near the Net - $699 per seat
Courtside - $6,499 per seat


Elton John Concert, Staples Center, Friday January 25th
Nosebleed Opposite End seats - $224 per seat
Bleachers Right of Stage - $510 per seat
Row 24 On Floor Right of Stage - $900 per seat


Mammoth Mountain Ski Resort, Mammoth CA, (current conditions 17 degrees, 50 inch base and 18 inches of new snow)
One Day Lift Ticket Adult - $169

Knott's Berry Farm, Buena Park CA
One Day Adult Ticket pre-purchase - $46
One Day All-Inclusive Ticket pre-purchase - $182
(includes park admission, parking, All Day Dining plan, souvenir bottle with free refills, Fast Lane access to all rides, FunPix photos)
Annual Pass Adult - $95

Sea World, San Diego CA
One Day Adult Ticket pre-purchase - $81
One Day Adult Ticket plus All Day Dining - $102
Annual Pass Adult - $119
(No blockout dates, includes Parking, and 2 free tickets to give to friends/family)

Universal Studios, Universal City CA
One Day Adult Ticket pre-purchase - $109
Gold Annual Pass Adult - $309
(30 blockout dates, includes Parking)
Something to keep in mind is that the non theme park ticket prices are for limited events. The Rams have 8 home games per year (plus playoffs which is the date you chose so the prices are higher.) . The Lakers 41 home dates, concerts are one maybe a couple dates per city and even the ski slopes are seasonal. Limited supply plays a part in their price point. Disneyland is open 365 days a year. There is no restriction on dates it is available to see.

It is simple economics however. It is very impressive that Disney can command these price points. There will be a price ceiling, but we aren't there yet.
 

SuddenStorm

Well-Known Member
This is slightly unrelated, but it's also just funny and terrifying at the same time. And it does show what happens when you have to go the opposite direction on pricing to get overwhelming crowds.

Over the Christmas break this year Six Flags Magic Mountain had a very badly planned "Bring A Friend For FREE!" ticket offer. This was the result. Look at the freeway drone shots later in the video!

Worth noting that those parking their cars in an unmarked dirt lot with no lines were still paying the $25 Six Flags charges.

Say what you will about Disney's parking price increase, at least there it's a nice structure with a nice tram.
 

Phrubruh

Well-Known Member
Worth noting that those parking their cars in an unmarked dirt lot with no lines were still paying the $25 Six Flags charges.

Say what you will about Disney's parking price increase, at least there it's a nice structure with a nice tram.
$25 to park in a dirt field with nails and no security at all. You guys don't know how good you got it.
 

Ismael Flores

Well-Known Member
most of knotts Berry Farm parking is also dirt, the last time i went was after some rain and its not fun. saw people getting their ars stuck in mud and having to get out and push while the workers stared at them lol
 

mickEblu

Well-Known Member
Doing some basic math here, if someone only visits on Saturdays:

1 Day Cost Peak: $149
1 Day Cost Regular: $129
Average: $139
Parking: $25
---------------
Daily Cost: $164

Signature
Cost: $1149
Break Even = 7 Visits

Signature (w/MaxPass)
Cost: $1249
Break Even = 8 Visits

Signature Plus
Cost: $1399
Break Even = 9 Visits

So if someone goes on Saturdays and plans on visiting one more time than the break even number for their pass, they would be better off buying a pass than tickets.

Personally I'd rather just visit 2 or 3 times a year at this point.
Yup. That’s exactly where I’m at. But for me it’s even more simple. To really enjoy myself at Disneyland I need to get there early and spend an entire day there to make it worth the hassle of traffic and make the most of my day when you consider crowds, rides/ FPs and just a good flow. The desire/ ability to do this with a 3 year old is not there more than 1-2 times a year.

I’ve gone back and forth from So Cal APs to Premium/ Signature and I noticed I went a lot more often as a Signature because I subconsciously felt the need to get my money’s worth. But all that meant was more frequent trips that were less fun. Not because of it getting old... which is also a factor but primarily because the types of abbreviated less desirable trips that became the norm.
 

Curious Constance

Well-Known Member
Yup. That’s exactly where I’m at. But for me it’s even more simple. To really enjoy myself at Disneyland I need to get there early and spend an entire day there to make it worth the hassle of traffic and make the most of my day when you consider crowds, rides/ FPs and just a good flow. The desire/ ability to do this with a 3 year old is not there more than 1-2 times a year.

I’ve gone back and forth from So Cal APs to Premium/ Signature and I noticed I went a lot more often as a Signature because I subconsciously felt the need to get my money’s worth. But all that meant was more frequent trips that were less fun. Not because of it getting old... which is also a factor but primarily because the types of abbreviated less desirable trips that became the norm.
Awwww, little mickEblu turned 3?
 

Darkbeer1

Well-Known Member
https://www.ocregister.com/2019/01/07/disneyland-admission-rises-nearly-sixfold-since-1990-hows-that-inflation-rate/

>>Disneyland’s magical pricing power has raised its basic ticket price nearly six-fold over three decades.


The new $149-a-day price is up from $25.50 in 1990, equal to 6.5 percent annualized growth. Now the Anaheim theme park has done much work to earn that increase — tons of renovation and innovation, including adding the Disney California Adventure park next door in 2001 to Galaxy’s Edge, the new Star Wars-themed attraction, coming to Disneyland later this year.

Argue, if you must, about whether the usually crowded parks’ prices make sense. But you’ll agree nobody would want to pay what I’ll call “Disneyland inflation” elsewhere in their lives.


Take the venerable cost-of-living benchmark, the national Consumer Price Index. This yardstick’s risen at an average 2.3 percent rate annually since ’90. But if American living expenses jumped like Disneyland prices, a shopper who paid $100 for in 1990 for goods and services that cost $191 in the past year — would have seen the same expenses soar to $584 instead.


Simply put, Disneyland outraced cost-of-living hikes by triple. To see how universal that pattern was, I filled my trusty spreadsheet with various economic measurements to see how these markers inflated during the past three decades and where these yardsticks would be if they had grown at the pace of a Disneyland admission.


California paychecks: How affordable is a theme park visit? Well, the statewide median household income in 2017 was $69,579 vs. $33,290 in 1990. That equals pay increases averaging 2.7 a year for nearly three decades. Now if your boss was as generous as Disneyland raised its prices, your family would be making $183,000 this year!

Baseball game: One visit to the typical Major League Baseball ballpark last season cost $231 for a family of four (tickets, parking, food and souvenirs) vs. $79 in 1991, according to Team Marketing’s fan Cost Index. That’s 3.9 percent annual inflation! At Disneyland’s inflation pace, teams owners would be getting $433 per game.


Big Mac: The Economist magazine tracks this fast-food classic as a global inflation benchmark. Last year, Americans were paying $5.51 per sandwich vs. $2.20 in ’90, by this math. That’s a 3.3 percent annual inflation! If McDonald’s had Disney’s pricing power, you’d be paying $12.85 today for two all-beef patties, special sauce, lettuce, cheese, pickles, onions – on a sesame seed bun!


Gasoline: One of those inflation markers everyone understands, California drivers paid an average $3.52 a gallon for unleaded regular last year vs. $1.14 in ’90. That’s 4.1 percent annual inflation! Be happy that gas stations didn’t get Disneyland inflation. If they did, you’d be filling up at $6.66 a gallon!<<

More examples at the link.

And one random thought, CM just got a raise, as the value of free admission and sign-ins are now worth more. And many CM's trade/sell their sign-ins for things like babysitting, auto repairs, etc.
 

nesboy43

Well-Known Member
Those articles that come out every price raise are so predictable. They always mention inflation even though a park with limited capacity and high demand has every reason to raise prices.

If Disney over the years adjusted only with inflation they would be at max capacity every day. I also don’t see Dodger Stadium adding billion dollar additions. Those news outlets are either looking for views or are not looking at the big picture. Expecting Disneyland prices to scale with the economy is definitely entitlement, as is someone who loves Disneyland but is upset when they are priced out of their pass. Going less frequently whether it be a pass every few years or using tickets is always an option.
 
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Phrubruh

Well-Known Member
Lol yes. And he’s been to Disneyland more than I did in my first 32 years of life. He’s already starting miss it. Now he sees old videos of him at DL on my iPhone and says “ova dere.” As in “I want to go there.”
Don't over do Disneyland on him. If you go too much you'll burn him out and Disneyland will be seen as a punishment. "Do you homework or I take you to Disneyland!"
 
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